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I need a bucket of arc sparks
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I have a question about helping epoxy primer cure, but I don't know if it will work or not. Lets say I spray a hood or a door with epoxy primer on a nice sunny day around 70-72 degrees but it gets cold at night. I then have no way to keep my garage heated all night above 65 degrees. I am wondering after the primer has cured to the touch and the panel has set out in the sun for a few hours. Could a person throw a cheap electric blanket on the panel at night to keep the temperature up so it will cure correctly?
 
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I am surprised that JCClark didn't jump right on this one. The main thing is to keep the metal temp up for the first 6-8 hours most of the time. If it gets too cold, the epoxy will stop curing. I would think that the blanket would do the trick if the epoxy is cured enough whee the blanket doesn't "print" it and also it doesn't get too hot.

Aaron
 

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Thats an interesting concept !

I think though that if it is talking 8+ hours at room temp for your epoxy
to be suitable for sanding and top coating, then you really need to be looking
at other products with a more productive dry time.

Spraying "Epoxy, depends on brand" at 70 degrees it should be dry to the touch in about 20 minutes. If you leave it over night and the temp drops down below say 50 degrees the next day "worst case" the epoxy should be ready for easy sanding and top coating.

If it aint then Try another brand !

x711
 
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All epoxies are different. You should check the tech sheets for that product. With SPI, they say that it needs to be at a minimum of 65-70 deg for 2-4 hours. It can be lightly sanded after 60+ minutes. Top coating can be done after an hour or so, depending on the number of coats.

Since it takes several days for epoxy to fully cure, it isn't a bad idea to keep it heated for a longer time.

Aaron
 

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My preference is one of those radiant heaters that looks like a radar dish. They will aim the heat at the panels, and even if the temp gets low in the garage it's not too hard to keep the metal temp up that way. I also highly recommend everyone who sprays 2K product in the wintertime to buy a non-contact infrared thermometer. Without one you really have no idea what's going on!
 

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I am wondering after the primer has cured to the touch and the panel has set out in the sun for a few hours.
FWIW-Don't know what brand of epoxy you're using, but the PPG DPLF tech sheet says not to allow direct sunlight on uncured primer.

neil
 

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Greetings all, first post on the boards, thanks for letting me in.

I am getting ready to shoot some ppg epoxy primer on a 56 chevy. Doing a rolling restore on the front end. I have the frame rails,firewall and all front end pieces sandblasted bare and ready to shoot.

A few questions, maybe you guys can help.

I have about a 5000 Sq ft shop and it is impossible to heat it to the right temp to paint. I have a bunch of pieces to prime all at once. The PPG Epoxy primer states to shoot it at around 70 deg, I wont be able to have that temp in the shop. If I shoot it at a colder temp (say around 50-60 deg) will it adhere properly?.


The temperature has to be maintained for it to cure?

Can I get away with drying the pieces with 500wt flood lights, heat lamps, radiant propane heater?

cold temp drying times??

Thanks for any help
Keith.
 

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It can be done. Consider 60°F a minimum METAL temp, and get an infrared thermometer. That temp must be maintained long after spraying is complete, I would say 24 hours to be safe, others may be able to add more on that, some epoxies may cure faster than others, and some have lower minimum temps. Be prepared to spend some money to keep those panels warm!
 

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What can be done is to make a mini booth in your shop and use heat lamps for doing parts..At least this way one can be moving forward on getting some work done.. :thumbup:

We did this at the boat shop I worked in to have a place to paint and clearcoat the smaller pieces that we had to do..

Sam
 

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Thanks for the help.

I was just looking at some PVC pieces I have and the mini-booth looks attainable. thanks for the idea OneMoreTime.

Ditto on the infrared thermometer. I have one of the Raytech gun type's.


Another question: A top coat or clearcoat for the primer. due to lack of funds and time I wont be able to paint right away. I need an idea on some form of clearcoat or topcoat to seal the primer with. Dont want the primer to Chalk up or look crappy after time. Glossy finish is fine, but it doesent have to be. Just something to protect the primer until I can paint it

Using PPG DPLF epoxy primer in black and white. (black on the framrails and front pieces, white on the firewall).
 

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If your piecs are kept inside the uv does not get to it and all that would need to be done is scuff it up a bit and shoot the final when you get to there..With what I use that is very doable..

Primer usually chalks up when left outside..say on a rat that is parked out in the weather..on parts in storage it is not a great issue..For chassis parts some single stage will be fine as well..

Sam
 

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If your not stuck on the brand of primer your going to use, I would take a look at HOK KD2000 primer. It dries to where it can be blocked in about 3 hours and and blocks like butter. I have a buddy that runs a custom paint shop that swares my it. I've been using it on a 71 chevelle that I'm restoring right know.
 
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