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Main usage is street, I don't plan on racing this engine. As far as power, the most HP and torque I can fit into it while being able to used regular gasoline. As for the vehicle, don't have one yet. It was going to go in my father's El Camino but plans have changed. I've been looking for a cheap project car to start off with (basically to make a sleeper). But the price for muscle cars around my area are ridiculous. People are selling chevelles/novas/pontiacs etc. with trees growing through them for $3000.
Money talks. These guys may be ASKING those ridiculous prices, but asking price and selling price are 2 different animals. My favorite thing to do when looking for a new project is to snoop around in alleys and side streets to find derelicts that are NOT being advertised as for sale. You can sometimes use the license tag number to go to your state motor vehicle department and find out who the owner is if you take photos of the car with the tag being shown. If there is a law that will not let you do that, try making friends with law enforcement. Perhaps you or someone in your family know an officer that you could ask to run the plates and find out who the owner is and get you some contact information.
 

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camarodriver67
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Rebuilding a 350 into a 383 stroker. Need help on pistons and deck clearance.

The easiest way to start the rebuild is to figure the parts stack. 1/2 of the stroke, compression height of pistons, and rod length. 3.750/2=1.850 + 1.440 + 5.700= 9.010" This is what you want to cut your deck to using this kit. Skip White Performance Detail Description This is the best price you will find anywhere! I would top the block with these ProFiler 195 cc Heads. Here is a description: SBC 23 Degree Cylinder Head, 11/32 Guides & Steel Seats
Intake Port Size: 195cc Intake Ports
Chamber Size: 72cc As Cast Chamber
Spark Plug Orientation: Straight Plug
Valve Job: 2.02/1.600 Valve Job
Assembly Options: Opt #93 Standard .650 Lift 1.437 Dual Springs, Steel Retainers, Keepers Assembled ADD $125.00
Casting Style: Standard Cooling
176 Total price $1263.72 BTW you can go a step up to the 210cc intake ports but looking at the flow charts the 195cc heads on a 383 cid engine are good up to 6500 rpm. 64cc chamber heads will give you a 10.98 c.r. and 70cc chamber heads will give you a 10.27 c.r. For the best performance and reliability a hyd. roller camshaft would be the best to use. You saved enough money on the rotating assembly to get a roller cam.
 

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That was my original question for this post. Do you think it's okay if I have the machine shop deck the block and afterwards from there I can choose the kit?
No, that's bass ackwards. Measure the block deck height, then shop for a kit that will fit into that block deck height, then cut the block decks to the correct block deck height for the kit and whatever head gasket you have to use, based on whether you will use iron heads or aluminum heads.

And by the way, you should plan to limit static compression ratio to no more than 9.5:1 with iron heads and no more than 10.5:1 with aluminum heads. I noticed in one of your posts that you said you wanted to run regular gas. Does that mean regular pump gas as opposed to racing fuel or does that mean that you want to be able to run on 87 octane "regular" pump gas? If it's 87 octane pump gas, I would recommend tightening up the squish to 0.030" to 0.035" and limiting the static compression ratio to no more than 9.0:1. That will mean using a very mild cam with maybe 204-206 degrees intake duration @0.050" lift and an operating range of roughly 1200 to 5000 rpm's.

Every engine build should begin with the available fuel quality.

.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
Okay I gotta a lot to respond to.

I brought the block to the machinist today and it turns out the block was no good. Already had a sleeve in it and was basically a really heavy paper weight. My family knows the machinest personally so were going to use a 350 small block that he had on hand for a small price. He is going to deck the block as minimally as possible and then from there I was going to choose my rotating assembly and heads.

As far as the use of this engine, when I say street I mean as a weekend/sunday car. Not a daily driver just something to screw around with on the weekends.

As for the pump gas. My original intentions was to use 87 octane gas but if my compression ratio needs to be that low then I have no problem with using premium fuel if I need to. If I use premium gas I can go up to 10.5 CR without any detonation issues?

I'm a little confused on roller cams. If my block is older than 87 I can't use a roller cam in it?

And I'm in no rush to find the project car this will be going into yet. I find the best way to find cars was how you said, drive around in neighborhoods and look for cars hidden under tarps and in driveways.
 

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Most all of the popular cam grinders produce "retro-fit roller cams" for earlier non-roller cam Gen I blocks back to 1955. The rollers are kept square to the cam by link bars that pair two lifters together, so that you use 8 pairs of roller lifters.....
http://www.aa1car.com/library/camshaft_roller.jpg
http://www.edelbrock.com/media/news/2007/automotive/img/hydraulic_cam_ford-chevy.jpg
I generally recommend Howards to most fellows who ask, because their quality is superb and their price is usually under that of other grinders. They've been grinding cams since Noah was a teenager.
http://howardscams.com/rt-4932-downloads.html
 

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Discussion Starter #47
No, that's bass ackwards. Measure the block deck height, then shop for a kit that will fit into that block deck height, then cut the block decks to the correct block deck height for the kit and whatever head gasket you have to use, based on whether you will use iron heads or aluminum heads.

And by the way, you should plan to limit static compression ratio to no more than 9.5:1 with iron heads and no more than 10.5:1 with aluminum heads. I noticed in one of your posts that you said you wanted to run regular gas. Does that mean regular pump gas as opposed to racing fuel or does that mean that you want to be able to run on 87 octane "regular" pump gas? If it's 87 octane pump gas, I would recommend tightening up the squish to 0.030" to 0.035" and limiting the static compression ratio to no more than 9.0:1. That will mean using a very mild cam with maybe 204-206 degrees intake duration @0.050" lift and an operating range of roughly 1200 to 5000 rpm's.

Every engine build should begin with the available fuel quality.

.

So just to make sure I am understanding this correctly, with premium fuel I am able to go up to 10.5 CR with aluminum heads?
 

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So just to make sure I am understanding this correctly, with premium fuel I am able to go up to 10.5 CR with aluminum heads?

Careful with the term 'premium'. It has a different octane rating dependng on the area you live. Locally, premium is either 92 (no ethanol) or 93 (with ethanol). But in some areas premium means 91 octane. Many will throw ethanol under the bus with tales of engine woes due to it, but can you say detonation resistance. At 10.5:1 ethanol is your friend - maybe not your fuel line's friend, but your piston, ring lands, and head's friend.
 

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Im fairly sure in my area its 93 octane.
Then you should have no problem running 10.5:1, although you will still have to jump through the hoops with squish/quench to make the motor bulletproof. You know that the higher the static compression ratio, the more cam you have to run, right? And the more cam you run, the more the operating range changes to higher revs, right? And the more cam you run, the more rear gear you will need, right?
 

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Keep in mind your going to get all kinds of differing opinions. They are worth about what you paid for them so I'd advise you not get to caught up in them.
If you can find someone you can communicate with and you trust that's worth more than a 1000 opinions.
+1 to that ^
Evilash, Im working on a 383 build as well and the guys on here have helped me a bunch with their knowledge already, post up what you have and the guys/gals on here will be happy to help I'm sure. Do what the others have said though, put it all on paper first that way you can identify a potential problem before you shell out any benjamins!

The prices on the machine shop are fairly consistent with what I see around here in NC.
 

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Discussion Starter #52
+1 to that ^
Evilash, Im working on a 383 build as well and the guys on here have helped me a bunch with their knowledge already, post up what you have and the guys/gals on here will be happy to help I'm sure. Do what the others have said though, put it all on paper first that way you can identify a potential problem before you shell out any benjamins!

The prices on the machine shop are fairly consistent with what I see around here in NC.
How far are you in your build?
 

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Ive got the block in the garage and waiting on the bottom end to get here from SCAT. I had several different configurations in mind and ran them by the folks on the forum here and they were all great with info... When I get the bottom end to the house I'm going to post another thread with pics to document my build. Posts are junk without Pics! LOL The guys/gals on here have a vast knowledge base and great experience to boot! The availability of having folks on the forum that are proficient at dyno'ing is great. I bet I went through three "paper" builds until I got to one that would suit my wants/application and now I'm assembling parts. Check for my build when I get the thread up and running. Let me know if I can be of any assistance, this is my first stroker build but I've done quite a few 350ci/355ci combos that have worked out pretty well for me. I've found, and I'm sure others will agree, builds work out the best when properly thought out and documented on paper before beginning. My major obstacle is it's hard to find decent machine shops anywhere around me. But then again, I'm OCD as heck, and I already knew my base beginning point was going to be a 383 with a forged rotating assembly around 11:1 compression for a street/strip type of combo. Running pump gas was not a major concern for me as I live close enough to Mooresville and Concord NC to get my hands on barrels of high octane stuff relatively easily, minus the cost! ha! Good luck
 

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Customer just dyno'd this:
block was a 95 TBI 350 2 bolt roller block, bored the block 30 over, installed splayed caps for insurance, Mahle flattop Pistons, AFR 195 65cc heads, hydraulic roller cam .548/.510 233/235 108 sep, Victor Jr. Intake, AED 850, 3500 stall. At the moment, I have a 8.8 limited slip with 4.10 gear with 350 turbo tranny.

532HP at 6200
515#/ft at 5000
At least 450#/ft from 4000 to 6200.

Going in a 67 Deuce.
 

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I have Howards lifters in both of my small block chevy builds and one is using the oem style roller lifters in the 87 and up block style and I am using a set of there retrofit hydraulic roller lifters of the link bar style in my new dart shp block and have yet to have it completed but is in the works and there lifters are made by one of the only few companies that make lifters and its made by Morel and the quality is just really spot on. I use the link bar style retrofit lifters on anything with over 530 lift using a 1.5 rocker arm ratio as using the oem design on anything with more lift then 530 you run the risk of the lifter dropping down to far and getting undone from the dogbone hold down bar and then at that point your lifter would then spin around and it would ruing your cam and lifter and maybe even the block. What's nice on the howards retrofit link bar style lifters they are made .200 taller and clear the higher lifter wall when using them on a oem roller type 87 and up block or something like the dart shp block. The link bar is able to go up and down without having to worry about it hitting the corners of the lifter bore during its movement.
 

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Engine Calculators Help a lot

Wallace Racing - Automotive Calculators

Just plug your stack in to this and it will give you your Static and Dynamic Compression. Dynamic is what you need to worry about mostly. You can be at 10:1 Static Compression like mine running 350 with Iron Vortecs which can handle more compression than older SBC heads. With my "stack" - Cam at 60 ABDC (Comp 268HE), Deck height.025", gasket thickness .015", Stroke 5.7", Bore Std 4" Head cc's at 65-66 involved, my Dynamic Compression would be 8.39:1. Still I am going to go with 91 Octane for cheap insurance. But Probably could back off the timing and run 87 in a pinch once I get the Fuel mix dial in. By the way these guys are worth a ton in knowledge. I just got back into old Chevs from being into Aircooled VW's recently and had to learn all the new stuff with them. It is great to find guru enthusiasts like me!! Well maybe me not a guru yet on Chevy's. LOL!
 

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Abdc?

You should be able to get that from your cam card specs that come with them or look at the website for this info. Compcams Publishes them on their website when choosing the cams.
 
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