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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello guys I am looking into buying a book on welding and I am totally new to the subject and know only the basics starting off wise of knowing the difference between old stick welding and MIG and TIG welding along with flux core welding styles of machines you can get. I looked on amazon and I am lost on what I should look for in a book on welding as mostly I want to get one that covers pretty much everything across the board especially when it comes to flux core welding which I have practiced a few times before on somebody else's welder.

I know the flux core is the easiest to use for the novel beginner from what I have seen watching videos on youtube and reading up on it here and there. Can anyone recommend a good book that covers all the basics and covers advanced stuff like auto body stuff and welding sheet metal and similar do it your self type stuff? Thanks guys
 

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As far as automotive use, older but modern style vehicle (POS) quality collision repair can be accomplished with flux core. But MIG is the standard for the most part. TIG would be that in fabrication and sometimes also in restoration. Less often in collision.

As far as a book... I bet welders still come with manuals. Classroom would be the place to pick up practical knowledge and experiment with types. In my opinion.
 

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One advantage of MIG with shielding gas is that if you are inexperienced you can still usually get a decent looking weld. You still have to worry about getting good penetration so that its a good weld, but it won't need as much clean up when you are done. One downside of gas is that you need to have relatively still air to keep the gas flowing on the joint. It won't work well if you are trying to do your work outside on a breezy day.

Stick welding or MIG with flux core will also work, but it takes more skill to get it smooth, especially stick welding. However, one advantage of stick welding is when you are welding thick metal, since you can usually find a new or used welder for a much lower price than MIG.

I always thought TIG was primarily for more specialized welding (aluminum, parts fabrication, etc.), and I know it takes more skill, but I'm seeing more use of TIG for general work.

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am not wanting to be doing anything serious do to many reasons but its just for the occasional rust hole fix here and there and nothing big as I am not looking or able to do things like that but just like if I get some rot spots here and there that can use just a patch up job and simple little things. Won't be anything on a regular basis just once in a blue moon type of a deal.
 

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I started out with a good quality commercial MIG welder and was doing not too bad with it, or so I thought. One day I dropped a piece that I had just welded up (2 pieces of 1/8") and it broke apart. I found with the MIG, I couldn't actually see the weld happening, it was too fast, so I was never sure of penetration, even though the weld looked good. I switched over to a Miller Syncrowave TIG welder and had great success. I can watch the metal melt, much like gas welding, so for me, I had no trouble learning the TIG and after I tried it a bit, I took a night school course and got the basic technical info as well. I use it almost exclusively now for body sheet metal as it's not as brittle and files much like the original metal.
 

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Flux core in an old small Hobart served me through 4 years of collision repair. For sheetmetal purposes, its better for plug welds than sectioning but will get a guy by in the context you describe. It is much messier but for a beginner with a MIG the difference would be less drastic I imagine because the welds themselves won't look like a stack of dimes either way. FWIW, I haven't heard of anyone stick welding sheetmetal.
 

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I use a hobart 140 with 0.023 wire for body work, I have been using flux core which is fine for small holes and spots, but if you are trying to run any kind of a short bead along a seem the shielding gas is the way to go.
for heaver junk welding around my place i use a stick.

i recommend you get a cheap wire mig at northern tools or harbor frieght to play with and get the hang of it. and go from there. also it is best to change over to the 11 pound spool vice the 2pounds that usually comes with the welder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The few times I have welded something was using MIG welding with gas and my Father uses that method all the time for just about everything and he has welded for over 50 years and he let me use his welder one time and for a first timer I did not do too bad but was just looking for a book to educate myself without having to watch tons of videos which I have been doing and will so more but its nice to have books to look back on to reflect on things and refresh your mind especially if you don't do to much.

I am limited in what I can do a lot because of a lot of issues going on so I am just looking for something in the rare occasion to have the ability to fix something very minor. I just have a few rust spots that needed some metal cut out in my floor board and a tiny piece of sheet metal put in to cover the hole up and nothing fancy. Talking about a 6 inch long by 3 inch high piece and that is it for now. And a tiny exhaust leak on one pipe that just needs to have a quick weld up on the outer weld.
 

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a book would be a waste of money, look for videos online. taking a class at the local community college might help too. while i've used every welder imaginable over 40 years, i own a fluxcore. it does everything i need, i built 80% of my avatar with it. get a mig, but run fluxcore for the learning process. fluxcore doesn't need gas and can be used outside where mig shield would blow away. my welding cart is a piece of plywood with 4 cheap casters on it

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Automotive lighting
 

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If at all possible, take a welding course (BOCES, continuing education, etc.). Then go with what you are comfortable with - you will have much better luck starting with a few good habits than playing "poke and hope" with what a stranger thinks will work for you.
 

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Hello guys I am looking into buying a book on welding and I am totally new to the subject and know only the basics starting off wise of knowing the difference between old stick welding and MIG and TIG welding along with flux core welding styles of machines you can get. I looked on amazon and I am lost on what I should look for in a book on welding as mostly I want to get one that covers pretty much everything across the board especially when it comes to flux core welding which I have practiced a few times before on somebody else's welder.

I know the flux core is the easiest to use for the novel beginner from what I have seen watching videos on youtube and reading up on it here and there. Can anyone recommend a good book that covers all the basics and covers advanced stuff like auto body stuff and welding sheet metal and similar do it your self type stuff? Thanks guys
I'd go to a welding manufactures site like Lincoln and see what information they have available. They generally have pretty good how to books. I've used the MIG with and without the gas and it's worked out good for me and can do most any welding needed on the car. Hope this helped, good luck and Happy New Year Too.
 

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Courses and welding school are pretty much useless for welding sheet metal.
Every guy from a school that's walked into our shop was pretty much lost. I asked them how much sheet metal they practiced on at :"school"....the answer was always none.

Do like my old boss told me. Take off cuts/drops and start practicing.
 

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I once was lost. My first welding job was a uniside on a LeSabre. About a hunnert plug welds facing the ground. I struggled, didn't get far. Bodyman who fitted it up left on vacation and nobody told me the welder was out of gas. I didn't know. A smidge of book learning might have applied before tackling that. So I agree practice practice and agree few classes get into sheetmetal welding but believe that understanding principles beforehand is wise. Especially where molten metal is concerned. But everybody ain't necessarily as dense as me.
 

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Hello guys I am looking into buying a book on welding and I am totally new to the subject and know only the basics starting off wise of knowing the difference between old stick welding and MIG and TIG welding along with flux core welding styles of machines you can get. I looked on amazon and I am lost on what I should look for in a book on welding as mostly I want to get one that covers pretty much everything across the board especially when it comes to flux core welding which I have practiced a few times before on somebody else's welder.

I know the flux core is the easiest to use for the novel beginner from what I have seen watching videos on youtube and reading up on it here and there. Can anyone recommend a good book that covers all the basics and covers advanced stuff like auto body stuff and welding sheet metal and similar do it your self type stuff? Thanks guys
Hi Eric,
Weldmonger has a wide selection of good videos you might want to check out. From beginners to advanced. Bottom line to be good is - you need to practice and practice. I hope this helps out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I will check it out and practice is part of the plan. I am going to try and get with my Father once I get and decide on a welder and have him show me some tricks since he had been doing it for so long he can do it on the quick of the fly without using his helmet and closing his eyes on a short amount of a spot and weld it up as good as you can get. He has about 50 years and I remember the days growing up back in the 80's and he used the old stick welder deal and he would fabricate and make custom things on cars for folks to make extra money and stuff.
 
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