Hot Rod Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was reading an thread on a different forum(cs), a fellow made mention of how insurance companies deal with unsafe mods and fab work. ie backyard wrenching. This paticular company refused to provide a policy to a person who lowered there car, unless it was returned to a stock condition.

I'm a bit of a noob when it comes to this, but I have seen eough people do less than quality work, as I'm sure most everybody else. People who who just bought a new miller, figure they are a welder, people who just got a new set of craftsman wrenches figure there smokey, people who just got a soldering gun, figure they can run wire.... you get the idea.


The question is for you lads, and judging by some of your projects . ie. ground up builds and complete restorations, you are qualified to answer.

How do you go about getting certification, registration and insurance for your vehicles?

I would hate to do some work on a vehicle, only to have some sort of calamity, causing a injury and having the lawyers rip me apart because I was'nt qualfied to do said work.

How would one go about following set engineering standards? Does one just take the car when finished , to the inspection center, tell the tech what you have done to the car and let him judge, realizing that if you were not truthfull it would just put you back on the hook for liability.

This is some what of an open ended question. I think people and myself would benifit, hearing, in how do do it right from the start.

cheers
 

·
Glad To Be Here
Joined
·
2,240 Posts
abuseddog said:
How do you go about getting certification, registration and insurance for your vehicles?

I would hate to do some work on a vehicle, only to have some sort of calamity, causing a injury and having the lawyers rip me apart because I was'nt qualfied to do said work.

How would one go about following set engineering standards? Does one just take the car when finished , to the inspection center, tell the tech what you have done to the car and let him judge, realizing that if you were not truthfull it would just put you back on the hook for liability.
Great questions but unfortunately difficult to answer.

Registering a vehicle can be easy (have current registration/title from the state or province you live in) to difficult (home built vehicle from miscellaneous components). For the home built receipts for major components are required (engine, trans, rear end, frame or frame materials, body or materials to build body, etc.). Notarized receipts are better. Every state or province will have it's own unique requirements to be met.

Insurance can also be easy ( name brand factory built vehicle ) to difficult (home built vehicle). There are insurance company's that will insure any type of vehicle but may require the company's own inspection before insuring.

As to lawyers ripping you a new one for doing repairs or modifications to any vehicle...that can and does happen in the situation you described. That's what lawyers do to win. Just a fact of life. It would be difficult for a single individual to be licensed and/or certified in all the fields required to be "totally" qualified to construct a vehicle from scratch. Would have to be certified machinist, welder, electrician, degreed in engineering, etc. and would still be liable. The auto manufacturers get sued for liability every day. As to engineering standards, they change constantly, so it would be difficult to keep up with all the changes.

If you have built a complete vehicle and your state/province requires an inspection this will have to be done and must eventually Pass to be registered. Most of these inspections are for equipment. i.e. brakes, lights, wipers, tires, exhaust, etc. Some may also require the vehicle to pass "smog" test which will vary from one area to another and also from the type of vehicle. Older vehicles and diesel powered or electric powered are usually exempt.

Hope this is the type of info you are looking for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Frisco, yeah, pretty much what I was looking for. I guess if it can pass the inspection, liability would be shifted/accepted by somebody else.

It would really suck to bring the vehicle in only to find out that that frame welding was'nt up to speed.

I would love to see a book of average "standards", ie use 10 gauge wiring for dual 14" electric fans, instaed of trying 16 and having a meltdown. Manafacturer specs would be included in new parts, but most people use combinations of new and old.

I would'nt mind hearing some of the inspection stories, not that anybody would admit to shoddy work !!!

cheers
 

·
Glad To Be Here
Joined
·
2,240 Posts
abuseddog said:
I guess if it can pass the inspection, liability would be shifted/accepted by somebody else.

It would really suck to bring the vehicle in only to find out that that frame welding was'nt up to speed.
Liability is always with the owner, then to manufacturers.

Here in the U.S I don't think any state motor vehicle department checks welds for any reason. Many states do have equipment inspections as I previously mentioned. Welds are checked by different racing organizations such as N.H.R.A. and must pass for some classes ( usually 10 second or faster vehicles ).

I have read on the Aussie Hot Rod boards where they have very rigid inspections to get a Hot Rod / Modified vehicle registered.

All that being said, registration, insurance and inspection in most states are fairly simple and straight forward.

For example:

If the vehicle is presently registered/titled in the new owners home state, the new owner simply takes the paperwork to the local DMV (Tag Office) to transfer the ownership and most states also require a transfer tax to be paid as well as transfer fees. The new owner would also call his Insurance agent and provide the vehicles VIN (serial numbers) and specify the amounts or type of insurance they want. Most insurance company's don't ask if the vehicle is or has been or will be modified. The standard policy's usually will not cover any loss if the vehicle is used for racing. If the state has an inspection required for the vehicle, the new owner usually has up to 30 days to get it done. As I previously stated the inspections are usually for equipment and smog test.

Problems come up when the vehicle is from another state / country. Even with documentation, some states can make the registration very difficult and frustrating. See the thread about registering a vehicle from out of state in Kansas . Here in North Carolina the transfer of ownership for an out of state vehicle is not too bad. The VIN has to be verified (a tracing is acceptable), all documentation must be included, fees paid. Inspection is not required on vehicles over 35 years old. I have insurance with Grundy for an agreed upon dollar value and they required that the vehicle be garaged. They are aware that it is a modified vehicle.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,400 Posts
I think it boils down to......If you dont feel comfortable to do a job, don't do it.

However, there are incompitant people out there, that think that anything they do is safe....Not always the case.

Complex question.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top