Hot Rod Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm working on a '64 Chevy pickup and I've done some work on part of this door already, but today I had really nice weather, so I took it outside and stripped the rest of the paint off to see what else I will need to do. I found that there was some body filler under the paint on that part of the door, and when I removed the filler I found another dent and some rust pitting. So, I thought I would ask what would you do? Continue trying to repair this or buy a repro door skin and replace it? Here is what I've done already and what still needs to be done if I try to save it:

1. There was a section rusted close to the left edge, and so I cut out that section and welded in a small patch there and one coat of filler has been applied. It will need a little more filler and then sanded out. Above that, it had the usual dent where the door had opened too far against the fender and dented in. That was pulled out as best I could and filler applied. It also needs a little more filler in that area and then sanded out.
615319



2. In the past it appears that previous owners had attached various mirrors to the door at different times. There were a series of holes drilled, and the metal was distorted from the mirrors apparently being bumped around. I have welded up the holes and then pulled out the surrounding metal as best I could. It's still a little rough and will need some more work and then some filler to smooth it out. In addition, there is a dent that runs above that area that needs to be pulled out and finished.
615321


3. The lower right corner was rusted through. I cut it out and replaced it with a patch, but unfortunately I got some distortion in the process. I can't get behind it with a dolly, so I did my best to pull it back out with a stud puller. I'm not proud of the result, but I think I can still cover it with filler and it won't be more that 1/8" thick.
615324


4. There are some small rust holes in the lower left corner, a dent above that, and assorted rust pitting in that area. I anticipate that I'll need to weld in a patch for that corner and treat the pits with metal wash, and then apply filler over the area.
615325


So, with my skill level I anticipate that probably 50% of the area will end up covered in filler. I'll do my best to keep the filler from being applied too thick. But I'm wondering if with all the problems if I might be better off buying a new skin? I know that comes with it's own problems, and I had trouble folding over the edges on the patch I did so I'm concerned about how well I could fold over an entire skin. Plus, the skin will need to be welded at top, but at least I can get a dolly behind it to planish the weld. But the bottom line is I want to make the result the best I can make it. What would you do? Thanks for looking this over.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,271 Posts
My opinion is keep what you have.
I can only imagine trying to skin a door with an aftermarket part. Sounds like a nightmare to me.

Skinning doors has been a very common repair up until just a few years ago. So for me personally, after many years of practice=(poor results!) I can whip these out with little, or no filler around the edges. Only because it is faster =(more money)
Filler is not bad, so don't be scared of it. Filler is your friend.

My advice is use short strand fiberglass filler over any questionable pitting you can't dig out with a 36 grit Roloc. Also use the fiberglass over welds.

This will keep anything evil buried for at least 10 years. Also, very critical, seal the back side of panels with good undercoat. And make sure to use good seam sealer inside the door after cleaning all the rust and old paint away.

If people saw under show car finishes, you would not be afraid of filler. It can be as thick as you need it(within reason) it is designed to stick, and stay stuck. Just prepare your surface correctly and you are golden.

Many guys who do this for a living, I would say 95% can't skin a door nicely. I have a combination of "tricks" that I use to get good results. These were acquired over many years of working close by many old techs who had been doing it for awhile. I made a few mistakes at first, but in the body shop you always have the next one to get at right.
With the quality of parts now days I would not recommend an aftermarket door skin.
Dynaglass is your friend!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My opinion is keep what you have.
Thank you so much for your advice. That's the direction I was headed, but I guess I just needed some reassurance that I was going the right way.

I have not used the short strand fiberglass filler, so I appreciate the tip - I'll pick up some of that. I have a ranch house with an attached garage, and my wife is really sensitive to odors, so my plan is to take the door to a shop to have epoxy sprayed on it and then some sandable primer. I'm wondering when is the best time to apply the seam sealer - before the primer is applied or afterwards?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,271 Posts
Thank you so much for your advice. That's the direction I was headed, but I guess I just needed some reassurance that I was going the right way.

I have not used the short strand fiberglass filler, so I appreciate the tip - I'll pick up some of that. I have a ranch house with an attached garage, and my wife is really sensitive to odors, so my plan is to take the door to a shop to have epoxy sprayed on it and then some sandable primer. I'm wondering when is the best time to apply the seam sealer - before the primer is applied or afterwards?
You can put seam sealer on over the primer. If you are using a 1K, like the old style fast and firm do it after everything is scuffed, and prepped, and right before you start laying down paint.

If you use the new style two-part seam sealer, you can pretty much put it on when you like, because it gets hard as a rock after 30 minutes or so...
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top