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Discussion Starter #1
I just brought home an offshore replacement door for my '87 Chey P/U. Everything seems to line up so far...(Haven't tried the fender yet) but the door pillar could use some tweaks. I don't want to mess with this door if it needs to go back.

Any opinions on if this is easily remedied? (Newbie bodywork guy) - Rebuilding the original is out of the question - too far gone

Notice the pillar gap is good top and bottom. The center of the pillar looks as if it sprung back slightly after it was stamped (like it has a crown) I'd like to make this gap consistent throughout (within reason)

Thanks in advance

Gear
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The back pillar is bang on...are you referring to tweaking the top front corner outward, in effect removing the bow?

PS, Thanks.
 

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I am taking it all your gaps are good and the door fits flush, except where it meets the center of the a pillar and goes flush again. The door may just be formed wrong there and some massaging need to be done by hitting down with a two by four and a hammer. I would hang the fender first though and make sure the door is fitting square and flush with good gaps everywhere else. We use to put tiawan specials on cars and sometimes they would need tweaking like this. But you should have parts installed and check all areas first. If it is fitting the pillar good up at the top, sticks out in the middle, and then further down it lines up flush to the fender, I would say there is too much crown in that area, as moving the door would either make the top stick out or bottom stick out if all else is flush. At least from as much as I can tell from pictures. Install the fender and see how well you can get the two lining up. But if just that one area is out too far, I would stick a block of wood at the top of the door where it is actually flush (and close the door on it to so that area is supported, and pound down where it is bowed too much with a 2x4 and block of wood to hammer out the crown till its flush. Really hard not being there. Really hard not seeing exactly what you have and without a fender on, and how everything else is lining up.
 
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What I am saying is to use a block to support the top while you push the bow in. The doors can often be manipulated by hand, as long as there is room for it to flex. If the top is not held out, you will not have enough room for movement. I do not recomment hitting it with a hammer and wood until atleast trying to manipulate it by hand, as the doors are surprisingly easy to form by hand, with less unnecessary damage from pounding on it.

It is a good idea to check the fender fit also, before going too far. It is not unusual to find that a new panel, weather new OEM, or reproduction. I work in a collision shop, and have to make those adjustments all the time.

Aaron
 

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Car? Truck? Who Cares
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Years ago I replaced the doors on my 79.
They were cracking at the hinge.
New GM doors-----had about 1" gap at the top of the door.
I have heard that this is common on these doors.
I just did some bending to make it fit----and I am NOT a body guy.

Bryan
 

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Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
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Bryan, you and I, I think we were seperated at birth. :) I was planning on putting just what you did. These trucks had HORRIBLE fitting doors and fenders, HORRIBLE I say. :)

Believe it or not, I have used cheapie aftermarket fenders, hoods and rad supports that fit MUCH better than the originals!!

These trucks ALWAYS required the "massaging" being discussed here.

Brian
 
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