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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am installing a roll pan over a Hidden-Hitch on a 1995 S-10. I would like to know which filler would be the best to use for the seams. There is approx 1/2-5/8 inch of valley between the roll pan metal and fender panel, after they're riveted together.
Which would be better and why... fiberglass resin & cloth, or 'All-Metal' body filler. I'd appreciate any info.
 

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After riveting, don't even bother doing anything else to it. Your just wasting time and money on something that won't hold with out breaking loose in thirty days or so.

Do it right and weld it. Then use whatever you want to fill it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was thinking of welding it, but when I filled in two of the four available license plate holes, it really couldn't stand much heat and wanted to wash away easily. I tried stick and mig, with equal results.
BMO
 

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Sounds like your part was stamped from some real chintzy thin gauge sheet metal. Lower your heat setting as best you can and spot weld slowly allowing sufficent cool down each before each weld. Continue till you have complete welds. That's my best advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Either that or I'm a rookie welder. I got the pan from StylinTrucks.com. It shouldn't be chintzy, for what I paid. Oh well...
I appreciate the help and I'll try your advice. Would it help to turn up my argon flow to possibly help with more contact cooling?
 

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You should be using a mixed argon of 75 percent with 25 percent oxygen. Your supplier should have informed you. Pure argon is used for aluminum.

Try it with the increased flow. It may help. Just take your time.
 

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cjperotti said:
You should be using a mixed argon of 75 percent with 25 percent oxygen. Your supplier should have informed you. Pure argon is used for aluminum.

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Part of this is incorrect.
The gas mix for mig welding on steel is usually 75/25 or 80/20 mix of Argon and Carbon dioxide (CO2), and not oxygen. Higher argon % makes for lower penetration and has less cleaning action. If you are welding on clean thin steel sheet a very high argon % will help prevent burn-thru and flatten out the weld.

98/2 and 95/5 make nice welds on clean thin materials.
 

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Your right. Sometimes my brain moves faster than my thought process and instructs my fingers to do the same. I'm a genius working with two idiot parts.

Anyways, the mixture provides a better weld on steel parts. We use the mixture on our after market parts and sheet metal with no problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I am using a 75/25 mix, but I just call it Argon... sorry. I tried that technique and it seems to be working. It appears to be penetrating all the way through without washing away any virgin metal. Thanks guys, I appreciate the help.
BMO
 
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