Hot Rod Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok... I have read all the "The basics of the basics" posts, but I still have some questions on body painting:

1. I have a 150 PSI, 17.5 gallon Air Compressor. Will this be sufficient to paint with?

2. I have a gravity fed paint gun, ($60 from Home Depot - my wife loves me :) ) Will this be a good enough to paint a car?

3. I undersatand the etch primer/filler/primer/sealer deal. I understand primering panel by panel if I can do it all at one time.

Does this apply to the top coat? (painting panel by panel) And do I have to clear all at one time?

4. Don't they make paints with clear mixxed in? Anyone have any experience with this?

5. It is absolutely necessary to have a heat source and "bake" the paint?

6. Once you clear, and it dries..what is the proper amount of "soak in" time? How long does it usually take before you can wax and and buff?


I didn't really see these addressed in the other write ups. (Which are very good, BTW) I just thought would throw these out there...

Thanks!
 

·
I need a bucket of arc sparks
Joined
·
895 Posts
Do you only have one paint gun, if not, I would get another gun and use one specifically for paint and one for primer. I have 4 paint guns myself, I would never run primer through my paint only guns. Make sure you put a air dryer, filter and regulator on you lines, you do not want oil/water in your paint or primer. I have never heard of any clears being mixed into paint. The clear coat is the actual paint and the base is just a color coat. It is not necessary to bake the paint if catalyzed, but don't paint it if it is too cold or humid out, just follow the manufactures recommendations.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,453 Posts
1. Those specs don't tell anything about the capacity of the compressor. The most important specs are horsepower (5hp is minimum for serious painting), and CFM rate of the compressor (10cfm is minimum). Two stage compressor, belt driven as opposed to direct drive, one stage is ideal.

2. Not familiar with it but if it is similar to Harbor Freight's Chinese knock-off of about the same price range, it is a pretty good gun. Great for the hobbyist, will yield a very presentable paint job.

3. I have never been happy with painting panels separately. Even using the same paint out of the same can, I can never get a perfect color match. All at once is the only way I can get a job I am happy with. And with base/clear paints, yes, it all has to be done at one time. Do your prep the days before paint day and start spraying by mid-morning and you have plenty of time to finish by dark.

4. They don't have urethanes 'with the clear mixed in' per se but you can get one stage catalyzed acrylic enamels (except in California where they are illegal) that act just like BC/CC urethanes once they harden. Not quite as durable but still really good paint.

5. Always use catalyst in your paint and you don't need any heat. I just painted the cab of my truck with BC/CC catalyzed urethane Sunday (65F temp) and it is ready to color sand already. I have never used any auxiliary heat.

6. If you use catalyst as you should, you can and should color sand and polish ASAP (after 3 or 4 days) 'cause urethanes get really hard! Within the first month if possible. After that I don't like waxing before 6 months so the paint can totally cure without sealing in all the reducer with wax. No rush, urethanes are very durable and 6 months without wax is no problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,259 Posts
x-angel said:
1. I have a 150 PSI, 17.5 gallon Air Compressor. Will this be sufficient to paint with?
You won't need 150 PSI but like Willys said it's CFM that is important. Your 17.5 gallon tank is marginal but should work.

2. I have a gravity fed paint gun, ($60 from Home Depot - my wife loves me :) ) Will this be a good enough to paint a car?
When painting a car two things are important. The quality of the gun and the quality of the paint. An experienced painter may be able to paint your car using a $60 gun and have it come out looking great. If you're inexperienced just don't expect to wind up with a "show quality" paint job using a cheap gun. And definitely use a different gun for primer.

3. I undersatand the etch primer/filler/primer/sealer deal. I understand primering panel by panel if I can do it all at one time. Does this apply to the top coat? (painting panel by panel) And do I have to clear all at one time?
It is best to paint everything all at once if possible even if it's disassembled. This is especially important if you're using metallics where uniform coverage is key. When it comes to single panels, you can get away with painting one panel at a time if you're using a solid color. When it comes to clear do the entire car all at once or at least an entire panel. You can't just do one section of a panel and have it look good. Of course if you're just doing one panel at a time then just clear that panel. The "P" sheets for the paint you're using will give instructions for clearing including how long after the base you can clear without sanding and re-coating, spray pressures, mixing ratios, etc.

4. Don't they make paints with clear mixxed in? Anyone have any experience with this?
They are called single stage paints. Acrylic enamels, acrylic urethanes etc. Some also give you the option of mixing clear in with the final coat for extra UV protection and a deeper shine.

5. It is absolutely necessary to have a heat source and "bake" the paint?
No, unless you're using enamel. Cheap enamel can take quite a while to out-gas (dry) and baking helps this process along.

6. Once you clear, and it dries..what is the proper amount of "soak in" time? How long does it usually take before you can wax and and buff?
The "P" sheets will tell you this. It varies depending on the brand of paint and the type of paint you're using.

I'm sure some of our resident "Pros" will correct me if I'm wrong.

Centerline
Moderator
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
The specs on the gun (as per the box):

Brand: Husky
Fluid Nozzle: .055"
Paint Viscosity: Low-Medium
SCFM: 5.9 avg @ 40 PSI
Fan Pattern: 1.5-11"
Air Inlet: 1/4" NPS(M)
Cup Size: 20.3 oz

Picture:



The aircompressor is a husky as well.. got rid of the box a long time ago... will look those up later....

It is a 5-6 HP Compressor.

I am very anal when it comes to certain things, and I am willing to do a scratch project over and over again until I get it right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
From the specs on the gun, it looks like it may not be a HVLP unit. It will work fine but you will use (waste) more paint by using it. You might want to keep it for a primer gun and buy something different for finish painting. At the low end, the Harbor Freight HVLP at around $50 does a pretty decent job. Up the scale just a little is the Sharpe FineX 300 at $75 to $80. I've heard several good things about it. If you want to consider higher end, ask and we will be able to give you recomendations from $100 to $500
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #7


This one is on Harbor Freight for $59, stating its a HVLP

It says "Low air requirement: 5.91 CFM @ 29 PSI"
While mine says: "SCFM: 5.9 avg @ 40 PSI"

The HF gun has practically the same other specs as mine:
Recommended hose size: 3/8'', Air inlet: 1/4-18 NPS, Maximum PSI: 50 Weight: 1.5 lbs.

Is it this 11 psi difference that makes it an HVLP? (like I said, I am a rookie on this side of the house - mechanics is my strong suit.)

Shouldn't the one I have be able to be adjusted to 29? Or is that going to affect the CFM? Or is that SCFM static? (Meaning - cant change)

I am lucky that I actually have a HF store near me.

As long as this gun can prime, I consider it a good investment.

Paying $30 more dollars for the Sharpe is well worth is if you guys really recommend it.

As with everything, I personally dont think there is one "right" way to do this...its all about trial and error, and good prep work. And I am anal on prep work.

If the prime job is the key (which is what I always hear), then how good your BC/CC gun is moot. (However, the better the gun, the better the paint job)

I appreciate you guys' patience with a rookie/noob.
 

·
Glad the Jeep is on the road
Joined
·
809 Posts
onebadmerc said:
Do you only have one paint gun, if not, I would get another gun and use one specifically for paint and one for primer. I have 4 paint guns myself, I would never run primer through my paint only guns. Make sure you put a air dryer, filter and regulator on you lines, you do not want oil/water in your paint or primer. I have never heard of any clears being mixed into paint. The clear coat is the actual paint and the base is just a color coat. It is not necessary to bake the paint if catalyzed, but don't paint it if it is too cold or humid out, just follow the manufactures recommendations.
OK -- assuming you clean your gun well, Why?
 

·
I need a bucket of arc sparks
Joined
·
895 Posts
Primer will wear out your paint gun, the particles in the primer are more coarse than in paints. This is what my old autobody instructor told me 13 years ago, but he could be wrong. I always have always used different guns for paint and primer and have not had any problems yet.
 

·
Glad the Jeep is on the road
Joined
·
809 Posts
Thanks -- since I just happen to have two guns, I'll use the HVLP for topcoat and the old fashioned gun someone gave me for primer.
 

·
Shop Owner And Troll Hunter
Joined
·
2,643 Posts
Clear coat can be tinted for custom effects.

Painting panels one at a time is risky as far as color match is concerned.

On custom and restoration jobs I paint the panels separate, but usually all at the same time.

Troy
 

·
The Penny Pincher
Joined
·
1,944 Posts
Don't get to hung up on the gun thing. You can get the results
you're after with most any of them. The important thing is
getting comfortable with the one you use. There's no substitute
for experience. If you use the same gun enough you will learn
what works best and get good at it. I used one of the
smallest cheapest guns on the market for ten years and
everyone was surprised at the results I got.
If you're going to color sand and rub the paint out to get
that show car finish then a little more or less orange peel
isn't going to make much difference. I've had hoods turn
out like sandpaper when I started painting a long time ago,
but sanded and buffed out they looked like a mirror.
Remember, all paint shrinks, if you are going to put a lot of clear
on it, it will shrink as it dries and it won't be a showcar finish
no matter how smooth it was when sprayed.
A good gun does make it easier but the end result can be
obtained with just about any of them.
P.S. Most of the cars I've painted I painted a little at a time,
over a several week period, I never had any matching problems.
If that was a problem I would never be able to fix a single dented
panel for someone.
 

·
Be the MIRACLE!
Joined
·
363 Posts
Interesting questions. I didn't know to use a different gun for primer than you do for color. I have a siphon gun for primer but I'll look into a HVLP before spring when the color coat goes on. Thanks for the questions, Angel and thanks for the answers guys. :thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
On the colormatching, I was thinking that as long as you get enough paint to do the job, it should be fine no matter how long it takes you to do the base color coat.

I know that when you clear, it should be done all at once.

Where I think people really screw up on this is that they don't follow up and try to let the equipment do all the work for them.

If you really want a good job, you have to pay attention to details, IMHO. You can't just slap paint on something, and expect it to look like a showroom job.

I will probably go ahead and get another HVLP gun just to be safe. But I know that I will have to pay attention to detail.

Once I get a few things taken care of, I am going to do a practice shoot on something like a fender or similar. I'll get something with some mild dents so I can practice my filling and all that, since I know that on my two project cars I will need to do that.

On the clear, I was thinking 1 or 2 good coats, or is that not enough?
 

·
Shop Owner And Troll Hunter
Joined
·
2,643 Posts
I like to put on 3 coats, gives plenty to sand if needed, then possibly 1 or 2 more clear coats, depending on what you are painting.

Troy
 

·
The Penny Pincher
Joined
·
1,944 Posts
If you do paint a car one part at a time, do this:
Right after buying a gallon of paint and having it mixed thourougly
pour off 3 quarts into 3 new 1 qt cans,
This will assure you the color will stay, if you keep pouring
off the top of the gallon a little at a time as you paint the car
it will be a little different at the bottom, no matter how well
you think you stirred it (especially metalics)
Start out using the quart left over in the gallon can. Chances
are you may have a full qt left over at the end and it will be
perfect for future repairs.
Also keep your gun settings and mixtures the same.
Good luck and let us know how it goes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
SO how much to do an average paint job? 1 Gallon? Be safe and get 2?

Who sells automotive paint in a "brick and mortar" store? This is something I dont think should be ordered over the internet
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
I'm interested as well, I know this is an old post but, how much paint do you need for the average basecoat? If you prime a car in pieces and then paint it as a whole with everything back together will you get an even color? or does the primer have that much of an effect on the paint color?
 

·
KING OF BONDO
Joined
·
809 Posts
flipp121 said:
I'm interested as well, I know this is an old post but, how much paint do you need for the average basecoat? If you prime a car in pieces and then paint it as a whole with everything back together will you get an even color? or does the primer have that much of an effect on the paint color?
I think 1 gallon is enough for an overall... if it mixes 1 to 1 then you will end up with 2 sprayable gallons. That should be more than enough for 1 vehicle.

As far as getting the color even... I think you need to spray your parts at the same time. Too many variables can change color... temp, reducer, humidity, gun settings etc... If u shoot them all at once or in one day, you should be fine. You can also wait until the next day to lay down the clear coat. Most finishes (base coat) will make it 24 hours b4 topcoat without having to be sanded and recoated. Best of luck

BK
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top