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I havent posted for a while,so I thought I would ask a question about oiling cars. I live in the heart of the rust belt,and it is a fairly common practice to have cars and trucks sprayed underneath with used oil.they drill the rockers and doors and spray them inside,spray the whole frame and suspension. I have all my daily drivers "oiled" every fall,and I havent replaced any rusted fuel lines or brake lines in years.the oil soaks in between panels and spot welded areas,any place the salt collects. if there is rust the oil soaks in to it,and slows it down considerably. it is sort of messy for a few days after it is done,once the excess oil drips off it is not bad. my question is is this a rust belt thing or is it just a local thing. when I talk about oiling cars a lot of people never heard of it.
 

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It's quite common here too..........I have had a couple of cars oiled, even done it myself with an old spray gun. With the beaters that I drive in the winter, they are usually pretty rusted when I get them..........It has given me a few more years on my 83 Blazer.
 

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Messy

Does work tho..there is a I belive a 34 Ford that runs out of Colorado that has no paint and is just oiled on a regular basis..no rust..he shows up at some of the old car meets with it and drives it everywhere..

OMT
 

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All those nooks and crannies in seams and similar areas collect dust, and dust will wick in oil just like it will water- the only difference is the oil will protect while the water just aids the corrosion process. If you ever looked at a dusty valvecover near an oil fill cap you'll notice the dust just pulls the oil away from the cap--acts like a wick. An old timer told me years ago it was common practice for the local garages to spray down the undersides of cars with keroseen the run them down a dusty road and repeat the process. Makes sense IMO but probably a fire hazard :D Cavity wax type sprays work really good in seams as they completely fill the void and the stuff is self healing. Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #6
rustproofing with oil

Well at least some of you have heard of this.there are several "garages" around here that oil cars[there used to be a lot of backyard oilers,but the environmentalists sort of frown on used motoroil running on the ground]. they used to charge around $20 for drilling and oiling,not bad for the amount of time and mess involved.The last time I had my vehicles "oiled" they used endura spray grease,goes on like oil,but jells into light grease after application.That operation cost$65 for my ranger pickup,and $50 for my wifes monte carlo. they both look pretty well oiled so I may not get them done this year. one of the locals has been oiling for 35 years.He pumps his used oil through an old hot water heater to thin it down for spraying. yes it does make a mess of the vehicle,but I usually drive them for a few days and then give them a good cleanup.
 

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You guys need to be careful here... I posted something similar to this in a thread a while back and was labeled as stupid... :rolleyes: Of course I use trans fluid so maybe there is a difference between that and oil... I don't know, the trans fluid works well so I'll keep using it.
 

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Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
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Wow is life different in the rust belt. Here in the "sun belt" I have never undercoated, oiled or anything else to any car I have ever owned. My 65 Skylark I recently sold had the original silver paint on the body mounts and zink plating on the bolts! The frame had the original semi glass black paint on the frame.

By the way, this car hadn't seen a garage in almost 30 years and was driven daily.

You all should see the "rough" cars around here.

Brian
 

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Not to Hi jack

Brian,

Just as an aside i looked at a 46 chev pickup which is rusted to the point of lace in spots just yesterday and still has the original shape..around here that is considered a good starting point for a build..

OMT
 

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I live in the north east ,and you can watch a car rust through the winter,but i never heard of oiling,,and im no kid,,, :
 

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If we look pass all the EPA and Salutatory rape laws, oil is one of the best defenders of rust there is.

As it will not hold water, will not crack and will not peel.

My wife has an uncle with a 63 Buick 225 convert in Michigan that he has had since new. He has sprayed this the above car with oil every winter since new and there is one little rust spot on whole car very front of driver door.
This car has never been painted! has about 120,000 miles but like new.

Oh he knows I want it!
 

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When I lived in New Hampshire in '77-'79 I saw it was a common practice to oil your car. Alot of guys used drain oil and used a crappy spray gun or a Hudson sprayer to do it with. I always preferred to work on an oiled car as opposed to an undercoated one because it was a pain get the wrench on a nut or bolt if the undercoat was too thick.
 

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I grew up in the 50s in Chicago and I never heard of it. I inherited a13 yr old 80 Buick from there that had been Ziebart coated when new, the internal waxy stuff, and the body is really good. But back about 92 the frame behind the rear wheels diappeared, about 98 the rear bumper actually fell off. They did not put anything into the frame rails.... yikes....

FYI it has a 301 Pontiac 4bbl with 230,000 miles and still runs well. Weren't they voted the worst engine ? lol


www.readershotrods.com drag cars/georges
 
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