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Buy and form a peice of sheetmetal to replace the trunk pan with and weld iit in place. The only other way in my mind would be to purchase a pre formed pan and weld it in. You could also try and find a solid trunk pan in a pic-a-part car cut it out and replace it in your car. All other options I don't like, but many people have used fiberglass and fillers to repair their pans.

HK
 

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Just one of the guys
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Go to a metal fabricators, purchase some sheetmetal around 20ga. have it cut to size and bent and or welded to what you need and replace what is bad. There are all kinds of economical ways to do it, starting with doing it yourself. Then there are the cheap ways to do it, and the more expensive ways to do it. You can eliminate welding and go to pop rivets. As far as I'm concerned this is not the proper way but it is an economical way and it will last for awhile if it is sealed so no water will get in the seams. What kind of experience do you have, and what kind of equipment do you have access to, and that would determine what route we can point you in.

Kevin
 

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Discussion Starter #4
well, ive got little to no welding experience, nor access to a welder if i did. i dont have the money to be spending a grand a month on it. im wanting to be able to drive it and restore it as i can afford to. i want to do it right but id like to see my money go towards visible improvements rather than floor boards, starters, timing cahains, radiators and such. but i geuss thats all part of owning an old car. and hey, if it wasnt this, then i would have a car payment each month. thanks for the help!!
 

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Best bet would be to try and get a part time job helping out around a body shop. Explain your situation that you are wanting to get into cars and see if they will hire you or see if they will do some trade labor.

Kevin
 

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I think it would be wise to repair it right the first time.You might end up with what happened to me.I bought a car that someone "repaired" the trunk floor with fiberglass.Problem was it is not the way to go.The whole trunk floor came loose and dropped the gas tank when it hit a bump.So I had to cut out a trunk floor from a parts car and weld it in.The trunk floor has more structural integrity to add to the car than one might think.
 

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Kenneth Howard hates you...
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Do it right the first time definately.
You can usually pick up a decent mig welder for a couple hundred $$ at sales/auctions,etc. You can always teach yourself to weld, especially mig welding. All it takes is a little practice and experimenting. Besides...if you are going to be restoring/repairing your old car yourself,you are going to need a welder more than once.Once you start tearing into a car that is almost 40 years old, do you think the only thing that is going to need replaced is the trunk? <img src="graemlins/nono.gif" border="0" alt="[nono]" />
As far as the trunk pan itself, you could possibly get away with making some patterns out of poster board and taking it to a local sheet metal fabricator. If you don't want to do the welding yourself, watch the papers or look in the phonebook under 'welding' there are always people that do this as a living.
Like Kevin said also you could try to get a part time job at a local (reputable) bodyshop. If you tell them that you are wanting to learn how to do bodywork yourself to restore your car(not as a business) they may give you a break.You may not make any money working there but the experience/bodywork you would receive would be well worth it. I have done this several times because I wanted to learn how to do something in case I would like to do it professionally...Now I build Hondas for a living :D
Later,
WEIMER
 

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If you can get your hands on the part from a parts car, (it can be cut out by hand with a hammer&chisel) then call a local highschool or college that offers automotive or welding classes and offer the project as a teaching aid. The work will cost you very little if anything, as it's all a tax write-off for the school. Just make sure you don't leave valuables in the car to tempt anyone. If this route isn't feasible & you do it yourself, use steel pop rivets, not aluminum as the al will react & corrode against the steel. I've done many repairs for people who made that mistake. Good luck!
 

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I'd recommend getting the welder.. Being 17 I always have to borrow the use of my adult friends welder... I can't wait to get one. Also if you don't have one get an air compressor.. It sounds expensive but you will save money on alot of labour and save your time.. angle grinder too.
 
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