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The idea of painting it is to aide oil drain back which it might help very very little. When the intake is on nobody will see it anyways and it won`t be worth 1 horsepower so why bother?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
DoubleVision said:
The idea of painting it is to aide oil drain back which it might help very very little. When the intake is on nobody will see it anyways and it won`t be worth 1 horsepower so why bother?
I have a 351 Cleveland. They are notorious for pushing to much oil into the galleries. I felt that an oil restriction kit and glossy paint would let the oil slip back to where it should be. I'm running hydraulic rollers so the lifters don't need much oil anyways.

And it looks sweet =D
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
DoubleVision said:
Then by all means go ahead. But I think oil drain back would be worlds better with the lifter valley polished. Painting still leaves the surface rough.
I know rustoleum is oil based and I was just wondering if it'll dissolve into my oil.
Phew, would that be a mess!
 

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Long term, it wont stick. I quit painting the inside of blocks many years ago. In a race engine, it seems to hold on OK, but on street driven engines which heat cycle alot and dont come apart often, the paint will flake off in large pieces. Powder coating will work or some epoxy based products but its really just make work to impress a customer. We did use the Rustoleum on the outside of the engines for years, but have now gone to a black epoxy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
lmsport said:
Long term, it wont stick. I quit painting the inside of blocks many years ago. In a race engine, it seems to hold on OK, but on street driven engines which heat cycle alot and dont come apart often, the paint will flake off in large pieces. Powder coating will work or some epoxy based products but its really just make work to impress a customer. We did use the Rustoleum on the outside of the engines for years, but have now gone to a black epoxy.
i'll have to kick some rustoleum *** if that happens
 

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Keep in mind that if the paint would just so happen to flake off,, You wouldn't want them paint chips to end up somewhere's like a oil pump screen.. :pain:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
NEW INTERIORS said:
Keep in mind that if the paint would just so happen to flake off,, You wouldn't want them paint chips to end up somewhere's like a oil pump screen.. :pain:
Haha yea thats true. When I disassembled the motor for the first time, i found June Bugs in the oil pan! The guy who had took before me took out the pcv valve or whatever...so there was a hole leading directly to the pan.
 

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DoubleVision said:
Then by all means go ahead. But I think oil drain back would be worlds better with the lifter valley polished. Painting still leaves the surface rough.
One block I have was done in glyptol. It still looks great! I chucked a can at work but it was probably 30 yars old! But if your prepping the block for paint anyways I would probably do a 40 to 80 grit at best and it wouldn't take long! No paint, just a shiney surface!
 

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painting lifter valley

Don't use rustoleum. Make darn sure valley is clean from any oil and use Glyptol. It is originally used for electrical work but is great for sealing any part of an engine that has had work done. TO keep bits and pieces where they don't belong., and oil drains back quicker. Use on your heads, under timing chain, and in the web of the block at the bottom of the cylinders also.
 

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Back in the seventies when I was turning wrenches for a living I had the occasion to do an engine replacement in a Ford F350 gas. This truck had a bazillion miles on it and was owned by a hot shot service. The current engine was using lots of oil and had been rebuilt about 300K miles before. The truck owners wanted a new Ford crate engine. When I removed the pan from the current engine after it was on the floor I noticed the entire crankcase was painted, as was the lifter valley and the interior of the heads. The paint looked as though it had been applied yesterday, and there was no sludge buildup anywhere. When the owner of the truck came in to pick it up I asked if he knew what the interior of the block had been painted with and he said Glyptal.

Vince
 

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Some performance books say that this is a bad idea. The oil is also used for cooling and if it drains back too fast, it's not taking away any heat from the upper end. Just FYI.
 

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The Eastwood Company has it. (No affiliation here)

I've used it in the past. Unless its my imagination, my oil stays very clean when treated with Glyptal. Had the heads (coated them too) off an engine for new guides and valves one time and they went through a full cycle in the big industrial washer and came out with no flakes or damage.
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majorownage said:
I'm wanting to paint the lifter gallery of my engine block.

I have 500 Fahrenheit primer and gloss black (500 Fahrenheit as well) rustoleum.

Should I proceed?
Simply put NO.

There's been a lot of baloney over the years about painting the inside of the engine to improve oil drain back and using paint to glue casting sand or burrs in place. The oil drains back plenty fast enough. This is a non problem that doesn't need a fix. As for casting crud, clean the thing. As for paint, there is no way to insure it will not come loose and circulate with the oil, the casting is porous, there is no way of insuring that machining oils, lubricating oils, and or hot tank residue has been totally removed from the surfaces at a microscopic level. Paint cannot stick to this stuff and will eventually be washed off. Given the paint serves no useful purpose to a well prepared engine, (the OEM level of prep seems plenty good so a hot rod prep is more than enough to insure a long and safe life) therefore, the risk of paint coming loose in there is not offset by any benefit. So just don't!


Bogie
 

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I have had paint clod an oil pump pickup before- not fun. Just use a carbide bit to clean up the external apssages and a flapper stick to clean the internal ones. Its much more effective and won't cause any problems. Just be sure to clean the block very thuroughly afterwards.
 
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