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Wow. Yeah, just buy the S&W kit. No common stock front-steer rack is narrow enough between the tie rod pivots to work with the S-10 lower a-arm pivot line, so the "modified" one they are selling is probably the thing, they may still not have gotten it narrow enough but I'd imagine if you run your lower a-arms level bump steer is reasonable and it's unlikely you will ever wear it out with the unusual car.
 

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A rack from a "rear-steer" (behind the axle) Intrepid should be super-entertaining in a front-steer application. Picture it. Of-course you could re-do your whole thing and put the steering behind the front axle, swapping to early-F spindles with steering arms made for that, but then you'd need a rack with a lot of width which might be a Chevy Celebrity or something. It would be good to look into basic conventional steering/suspension design a bit more to understand what needs to go on. With that, If what you want for your own reasons is for the a-arms to be angled down at rest then the tie rods have to angle down the same. The arcs created during travel have to be working with each other.
 

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Basic rule is, tie rods are the same length as the a-arms and run at the same angle, as seen from the front. Go by pivot position, not component shape. If the spindle steering arm places the tie rod level with the lower a-arm then the tie rod will be that length, if it happened to place it even with the upper then it would be that length instead, if the tie rod is positioned (as seen from the front) somewhere in the middle such as with a Mustang II then tie rod length will split the difference proportionately. That way when the suspension moves and the control arms create an arc out at the end which the spindle moves along, the tie rod causes the steering arm attached to the spindle to move along the same arc and voila no bump steer. Whatever the distance between the rack pivots on a particular application is, results from whatever happens to wind up being the proper length for tie rods. The complication is when you have a braking anti-dive angle on the upper a-arms as most cars do, the spindle/upright is rotated along the spindle axis during suspension travel which makes the steering arm raise and lower as compared to the spindle, making perfect bump steer elimination not possible so you just get it close or however you like it which is when you as a designer might be making minor changes to tie-rod length and angle, and that's what all the fuss is about.

Incidentally on a front-steer setup as seen from above, tie rods will angle forward from center to outboard when steered straight ahead, and wind up angling rearward at full lock whether using a pittman-arm or rack-and-pinion scheme.

It gets a little deeper than that, but them's the basics.
 

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But an Intrepid is actually a front steer. The rack in behind the struts, but the steering arms on the struts are in front of the tires.
You're quite right, having seen the rack at the firewall I assumed it was conventional-for-FWD rear-steer. You know what they say about assuming...
 
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