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Discussion Starter #1
Im trying to find a way to get rid of rust on my 1950 chevy. But is sandblasting the only way. T


Thx
Spike
 

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Depends where the rust is. You can sandblast the door jambs,fender edges , anywhere except the sheet metal like door exterior skins, hoods roofs, trunk lids. The heat from the sandblaster will warp sheet metal to the point that they are ruined. Media blasting is the way to go but you'll have to farm that out.Buy a little hand held blaster for small jobs. Again, DO NOT BLAST SHEET METAL. or your be buying new ones
 

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Spikes...There are different ways to remove the rust. You can sandblast, media blast, or have it dipped. I went the last route but I had a place to take it that is only about 50 miles from here. On the older cars it is safe to sandblast because the metal is thicker and harder than the new metals. If you do blast just make sure you keep moving and do not hesitate in one spot for too long. I sandblasted my front fenders on my '62 with no warpage what-so-ever and that was using a high pressure industrial blaster. As long as you use caution you will be ok.

Kevin
 
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I have seen numerous messages against sandblasting sheetmetal panels. I have blasted numerous panels and had no problem. I use a portable blaster that I bought from Sears. At best, I only have 125 psi. Maybe that is the difference. I don't know that I would try taking it to a business that does high pressure blasting. As long as you don't hold it in one area for a long time, I don't see how the average person at home is going to have problems. I am sure that there are some people out there that will argue that point, but it has worked for me. Then again I wouldn't try it on a 2003 model car either. They would end up with holes in them.

[ April 27, 2003: Message edited by: adtkart ]</p>
 

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I have a quick question that I figured I would ask in this thread:

What is the recommended media to use with blasting? I have been using a cheap Sears sandblaster and wire brush on an angle grinder to strip the undercarraige of my vehicle. It has been going way to slow so I gave up. I will be renting a pressurized blaster to finish up. I have to remove some undercoating on the undercarriage and also want to do the door jams and engine compartment which are not undercoated. What do you guys recomment for a media to use with the pressurized blaster? I was thinking sand for the undercoated areas but then switching over to like a glass bead for the engine compartment, door jams, and other "viewable" areas. Or can I just stick with sand for the full thing?

Thanks,
Kevin

[ May 06, 2003: Message edited by: starquest ]</p>
 

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I like silica sand for frame work (but wear a good hood and respirator- silica in the lungs can be deadly!!) and for sheet metal I just use a disc sander/ DA sander. Small areas you miss can be snagged with a smaller disc or spot blaster. I don't use glass bead as it is VERY slippery underfoot and (in my opinion) harder to clean up.
 

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sand=resperator!! <img src="graemlins/pain.gif" border="0" alt="[pain]" /> you can use it on panals unless you are like the guy who has been doing mine=lots of money to repair it. basically he ruined my new hood. i have no idea how much bondo it required when he got done, i was afraid to ask. but i watched him wreck it. he stayed in one area way too long, he should have gone lightly over the whole area many times, like a light coat of paint. LIKE I TOLD HIM TO DO BEFORE HE STARTED!! dumb *** . well, he's gone now. media, plastic or glass beads, is not supposed to hurt glass so you could leave it in, however, i would remove all glass just to get to whats underneath it. always seems to be rusty under glass for some reason. AS far as sand goes, they have non-silica stuff made out of copper that works the same way and you dont have to worry about killin yourself using it
 

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in my expierence, sand changes the metal surface, leaves it really gritty feeling so it takes some sanding to get it smooth enough for paint. glass bead leaves the metal almost smooth enough when your done. about blasting the undercoating on the frame, you need to scrape all you can off first, anything _slightly_ rubbery wont blast off, grease, undercoat, rubber... the media just bounces off of it.
 

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Ditto on Spanks reply. Any undercoating has to be scraped first. Blasting it only causes it to gum up.

Kevin
 

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I have taken every piece of sheet metal on my '49 to the sandblaster with no probelms. It takes a company that knows what they are doing. They do it at low pressure and stand a good distance from it. The sheet metal on your '50 is twice as thick as the cars of today. Plus the Blasting gives the metal a good texture for paint adhesion.
Anther option is Muratic acid. Use it with caution to protect youself. and rinse with baking soda and water to neutralize it.
Then the knoted wire brush on a angle grinder works well also.
Then Iam useing <a href="http://www.zerorust.com" target="_blank">www.zerorust.com</a> as my first coat of primer. Things rust quick here plus it cures the problem with the pited rust that was missed.
My two cents!
:D
 

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Soda blasting is nearly the same price, leaves the panels silky smooth and you don't have to worry about it getting behind supports etc. Pressure washing dissolves the soda (Baking soda!) and will let you get every last bit out. Also soda won't distort panels since it is non aggressive and very fine. Doesn't remove rust however but works great on paint and even works wonders on urethane body pieces.

After seeing how nice the panels come out after (they look like new bare metal) this is the only method I can recommend positively. The only other method that gave similar results was crushed walnut shells but finding shops who do this is getting hard. The nice thing about soda blasting is you use the same equipment as sand blasting.

Phone around, many shops can do it but just don't advertise it.
 

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With a Scotch-Brite pad on an angle grinder I can strip a car clean to bare metal in an hour or two. Perfect for removing rust safely without the mess and much quicker. I do like to follow up the odd spot or two with the sandblaster.

[ May 07, 2003: Message edited by: asennad ]</p>
 

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Discussion Starter #14
hey where can i buy a Scotch-Brite pad? I can get an angle grinder.

Thx
Spike
 

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Spikes, Since you are in the Detroit area, here's a couple of links for you to check out. <a href="http://www.wcsx.com" target="_blank">www.wcsx.com</a> once there click on JJ & Lynn and look for links to the Stone Soup project Mustang being built to raffle for the Children's Luekemia Foundation. Very neat project, anyways you can see a before and after job of media blasting done by Strip It, a local shop, on a 1967 Mustang. Also a link to Strip It for more pics. They are in Clinton Township.

Also check out <a href="http://www.usmetalprocessing.com" target="_blank">www.usmetalprocessing.com</a> They are located a couple of hours south in Ohio but can do Redi-Strip process and also offer media blasting. Good info on both processes at their site.

4 Jaw is right about soda blasting, very gentle on removing paint and easy to clean but it won't remove rust. I wouldn't sandblast sheet metal, there is better media available. However, some media including soda requires special equipment. Hopper style blasters won't work.

[ May 08, 2003: Message edited by: Axelrod ]</p>
 
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