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Watreless coolant would be really cool until you pop a radiator hose out in the middle of Nevada. You cannot add water? Right?
 

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I'd agree with you about the air movement IF The fan was downstream ( longer tube) so that the fan blades weren't creating turbulence " inside" the taper ....I'm hoping fr the best !
 

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Watreless coolant would be really cool until you pop a radiator hose out in the middle of Nevada. You cannot add water? Right?
You can add water but then it isn’t waterless anymore and if you want to get back to waterless once it’s repaired they you have to go through the ‘dry out’ process again to remove the water.

One thing I’ve experienced since going waterless is core leaks and hose failures went away.

Bogie
 

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Discussion Starter #44
I swear. Every time I do something to my hotrod, it always leads deeper then I thought. The new 2 groove WP pulley should have been a bolt on, but misses lining up with the crank pulley by an 1/8". The WP pulley needs to go towards the engine. Of course there is no room to push the flange farther onto the shaft, so I'll have to order crank pulley shims. Another time setback. I went out and bought 2 belts this morning. The WP/fan belt is too short and the fan/ alt belt is too long. So back to the parts store. Not a good morning so far.
 

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I swear. Every time I do something to my hotrod, it always leads deeper then I thought. The new 2 groove WP pulley should have been a bolt on, but misses lining up with the crank pulley by an 1/8". The WP pulley needs to go towards the engine. Of course there is no room to push the flange farther onto the shaft, so I'll have to order crank pulley shims. Another time setback. I went out and bought 2 belts this morning. The WP/fan belt is too short and the fan/ alt belt is too long. So back to the parts store. Not a good morning so far.
I'm sorry... it seems like my cloud is covering you, too. I thought that kind of crap only happened to me.
 

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Having a collection of belts and pulleys on hand has saved my ass a lot. Even, straight belt alignment is critical for belts to stay on. I stay with the old tried and true 3/8” belts and deep groove GM pulleys when ever possible. In fact I don’t have anything else. Plenty of tubular sleeves for shimming alternators and generators is a good idea too rather than a stack of washers.
 

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True but a stack of washers is definitely more difficult to get to stay in place. And sometimes the washers are too big a diameter to fit under the alternator and not bind against the case.
 

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If you can't pick the correct size washers , I can't help you !:rolleyes:


Mods. , over 20 seconds to load emojis , need more hampsters on the treadmills !!!!!
 

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If you can't pick the correct size washers , I can't help you !:rolleyes:


Mods. , over 20 seconds to load emojis , need more hampsters on the treadmills !!!!!
Not an issue I’ll stick with spacers cut to size to fit the custom application. Washers unless you gonna use shims limits the gap to about .025” assuming a 3/8 bolt in place. An assortment of various ANSI spec thicknesses will help your cause. But the washers falling out all over when repair or replacement is still an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #52
Having a collection of belts and pulleys on hand has saved my ass a lot. Even, straight belt alignment is critical for belts to stay on. I stay with the old tried and true 3/8” belts and deep groove GM pulleys when ever possible. In fact I don’t have anything else. Plenty of tubular sleeves for shimming alternators and generators is a good idea too rather than a stack of washers.
Yeah, I went through my stack of 25 or 30 belts and my pulley collection doesn't include a 2 groove pulley for a short water pump. Sometimes I wonder why I keep all this old crap.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
yep I ag
Not an issue I’ll stick with spacers cut to size to fit the custom application. Washers unless you gonna use shims limits the gap to about .025” assuming a 3/8 bolt in place. An assortment of various ANSI spec thicknesses will help your cause. But the washers falling out all over when repair or replacement is still an issue.
Yep I agree. Washers will always get you to a plus or minus situation. Sleeve will get you right on the money with a lot less parts to lose. Not to mention aesthetics. That is not to say I have never used a stack of washers!
Luckily enough, I think this time I can get away without shimming anything but the crank pulley.
 

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It’s always the way, no matter how many belts ya have ya just don’t have the length you need for the job your working on. Too often I run to parts store with two belts in hand requiring the size that falls in between. In fact it was just last week I was doing just that. But this keep us occupied and makes the world go around.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
I usually use a longer belt. Cut it. Wrap it around the pulleys and pull it as tight as I can and mark it. Measure that and it gets me pretty close. Right now that dedicated WP to crank belt is getting to me. Already 2 trips and I'm still not there. 34.75 is too loose. 34.5 is too loose. I can get a 34 on and the pulley installed, but it is tighter than I would like. I've checked Gates., Dayco, and Duracraft, a 34.25 belt doesn't seem to be available. I may end up having to get a different diameter WP pulley to make the belt work. I just am not going to put a tensioner on it.
 

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Belt are listed by nominal size so when trying different belts, stick to the same brand for most consistent results.
 

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Discussion Starter #57
Belt are listed by nominal size so when trying different belts, stick to the same brand for most consistent results.
Yes. After measuring about 10 different belts for width and thickness, I have come to the same conclusion. Stick with the same brand when working on belt lengths. As you say, more consistent.
The belts I have been getting are from Autozone. Duracraft brand. I can find no listings for Duracraft, but I have found Gates and Dayco listings by length. Neither Gates nor Dayco list anything between 34 and 34.5. It's interesting that Dayco and Duracraft sport the same part number.
 

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In my experience vacuum advance wants to be about 7 or 8 degrees. Maybe some body could explain why you would need/want more.

I have found to have a smaller pulley on the water pump and a larger one on the crank increases pump speed as well as fixed fan at idle.
Idle ignition lead has next to zero importance. It can be 2 degrees or 30 degrees depending on a few hundred factors. The only reason your shop manual says "10 degrees" is because the timing curve of the distributor from the factory is engineered to offer a certain advance curve and end up a an optimal 34-36 total. Once you change any parameter of the engine, the initial has zero bearing on things. The only reason you set it to 10 degrees at idle is because that is the setting that will give you 34-36 total, and it's a lot easier than setting your timing at 4000 rpms.

An example. I had built a 468 and was waiting on some ported heads. It had a pretty hairy cam. There were delays in getting the heads, so I slapped on some 049 heads just to get it moving under its own power which meant I had about 8.5:1 compression and a cam that was too big for those heads. Easy fix... zip ties on the advance weights and set initial to 34 degrees. Ran great.

Initial timing is incredibly inconsequential. The secret is making sure you recurve the distributor to give you a good initial, proper curve in the middle, and 34-36 up top. If you do that, it doesn't really matter what the initial is.
 

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Severely retarded ignition timing at low rpm will cause an engine to run hot . I don't believe that's inconsequential 😕
 

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Idle ignition lead has next to zero importance. It can be 2 degrees or 30 degrees depending on a few hundred factors. The only reason your shop manual says "10 degrees" is because the timing curve of the distributor from the factory is engineered to offer a certain advance curve and end up a an optimal 34-36 total. Once you change any parameter of the engine, the initial has zero bearing on things. The only reason you set it to 10 degrees at idle is because that is the setting that will give you 34-36 total, and it's a lot easier than setting your timing at 4000 rpms.

An example. I had built a 468 and was waiting on some ported heads. It had a pretty hairy cam. There were delays in getting the heads, so I slapped on some 049 heads just to get it moving under its own power which meant I had about 8.5:1 compression and a cam that was too big for those heads. Easy fix... zip ties on the advance weights and set initial to 34 degrees. Ran great.

Initial timing is incredibly inconsequential. The secret is making sure you recurve the distributor to give you a good initial, proper curve in the middle, and 34-36 up top. If you do that, it doesn't really matter what the initial is.
Does not answer the reason for so much VACUUM advance.
 
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