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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have one aluminum wheel that's a "slow leaker" Replaced the valve and tire, and it still leaks - slowly. So slow that you do not see bubbles in the wheel tank. Must be porosity in the casting. Has anyone sealed the inside of a rim with some sort of coating? Any and all ideas appreciated.

thanks,
 

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not really sure of any real cure for this other than replacing the wheel or just keep a close check on it. let me guess you have to air it up bout once a month and it's a GM?? Did I get either one right?? I have seen this many time kinda nature of the beast.Good luck.Brian
 

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or Jeff, or Doc, or...
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Squeeze a some Thread locker through the valvestem. Eventually, it will make it to the wheel portion. Green works best. The stuff for sleeves. Best wicking action. We use it on snowmobile cylinders when we get porose castings.

More than likely, its just a lousy bead though.
 

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russlaferrera said:
You can try a tier sealer ie: SLIME, or use a tube,or fill it with Nitrogen. Nitrogen is a little thicker that air.
I thought about slime but it won't work due to the fact centrifugal force slings the stuff to the out side of the wheel.I also remember reading on the bottle that it won't seal side wall damage so I would really doubt it would work on a wheel. "More than likely, its just a lousy bead though" like Beenaway2long said. I would try having the tire shop break down the tire and swab on some bead sealer,and If that did'nt work if it was me I'd cuss.LOL Brian Good luck
 

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Many years ago, I had a 65 Corvette with the factory aluminum knock-off wheels ... they were famous for leaking. The aluminum was porous ... and the TRICK back then was to paint the inner part of the wheel with aluminum Rustolem paint ( brand name ) It worked for me and my friends.

One wheel required two applications :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks, Deuce, I will give it a try. I am reasonably certain it's a porosity issue as it happened from the start with new wheels and tires. I will give the Rust-Oleum a go..
 

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Small leaks like these can be found by mixing a couple tablespoons of ivory dish soap in a half gallon of water. brush it on starting with the bead. Look for a fine froth along the seam. Then do the face of the tire then the inside the wheel. It may take a minute or so for the froth to appear. I have found a couple of porous wheels (94 GM) and dozens of slow leaks this way.
 

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Most any tire mounting store has a black tar-like substance specificly used for sealing bad beads to the wheel. Just paint it on thinly and you are all set. I gets dry to the touch but is always flexible.

You might have to check the farm co-op stores or cheapo tire places since custom wheel places often treat it like a bad omen to have it around.
 

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Deuce said:
Many years ago, I had a 65 Corvette with the factory aluminum knock-off wheels ... they were famous for leaking. The aluminum was porous ... and the TRICK back then was to paint the inner part of the wheel with aluminum Rustolem paint ( brand name ) It worked for me and my friends.

One wheel required two applications :)
I always like it when the Gray hairs give solutions. They are usually simple and effective. :thumbup: (Sorry deuce no offense, ment as a compliment. My heads starting to show signs of GRAY too :embarrass ) Brian :D
 
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