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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1965 ford step side. Removed the right rear fender. The seam where the fender flange meets the bed side has rusted from water getting between the fender and the bed side. I cleaned off the loss rust by grinding and scraping, applied Mar-hyde One Step to the surfaces of the flange and side of the bed. it came out hard and black. I am ready to put the fender back on and would like to know the best way to prevent this from happening again. Questions:

1. is it necessary to epoxy primer over the one step or can I put together as is?
2. How can I seal the seam between the fender flange and the bed side when I bolt back together to stop water from getting between the fender flange and bedside again.

The truck is in very good condition and this is the first time I have found significant rust. It is always garaged and never goes out in the rain or on wet roads. Any suggestions to fix this is welcome.
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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Hate to say it but that "converter" is BS. Take a wire wheel to a spot you did and you'll find fresh red rust underneath it ready to spread. I use it a rust "locator" as it turns even rust you didn't think was there, black. If you don't wish to go further, use epoxy primer on both parts, then bolt on, then a good 2K seam sealer and then paint. If kept dry, you may get lucky with your repair.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I will coat with epoxy primer and install with the 2K seam sealer. I do not plan on going further at this time. I would have to cut the flange off the fender and weld on a new piece. I would also have to cut the section out of the bed and weld in new metal. I could do this but at this point I will wait until it rust through. As it never goes out in the rain and is always garaged, this should last quite a while.

Thanks for the response
 

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My suggestions for your particular situation: Look up "fender welting" and skip the seam sealer because it could be a hassle later unless you wait for the fender to fall off. Epoxy primer would be a waste over MarHyde. I'd use glossy spray paint. Plenty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have never used a seam sealer. The 2k sealer you suggested, questions. This seam is going to be exposed and I will want to smooth out and paint over as I paint the repaired areas. Can the seam sealer by sanded like a body filler? When I install the fender with the seam sealer it is going to squeeze out and this needs to be flattened to look smooth. I will want to remove any sealer that gets on the fender or the truck bed after it hardens so the seam sealer is only in the joint . How do I do this? Most seam sealers I have seen are where they are not seen or on the under side of the chassis. This seam is a body seam on the exterior. My 52 truck had fender welt but this will not keep the water out.

Thanks
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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If you're doing a less than perfect repair, expect less than perfect results.

You need to mask very accurately around the fender and on the fender. You get one shot. Apply enough goo and use a rubber squeegee to remove the access. I just applied some on Sunday. It's an epoxy based 3M brand. It's a bit rubbery, so not sure if it's sandable. Where mine is, I will probably epoxy prime over it and glaze and sand smooth. I'm talking slivers, not gobs.

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Pic below shows lousy masking with the edges wavy. It's underneath so I wasn't too worried about it.
I will epoxy prime over these inside corners, sand the primer, coat again and keep blending until it looks good. Epoxy primer over epoxy sealer. No Bondo.

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I mention a smidgen of filler over the sealer after covering with epoxy primer. This is gonna occur on a flat plane as in the pic below. There will not be gobs of filler, just a lick as if it was high build primer.


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I'll be spraying epoxy primer over this sealer later this week. By the weekend I will try sanding at the inside corners a wee bit to see if it blends.
 

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Consider glass setting tape like used for vent windows. 8308 is sandable after half an hour but never expect it to featheredge.

What you guys are planning is a permanent bond. Better suited to 8115 if rust were not present. Seam sealer is not used like RTV.

I backspaced my first draft of this reply and support taking more time to think.
 

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Yep, think about it and also read the tech sheets for the products as well.

I have the tape edge to fill up on my under seams, the ones like the OP would have. Build up some epoxy primer to get it level with that small edge. That's the only way I can think of to blend it in without sanding the sealer.
 

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Its perfectly fine to sand (or trim) the sealer, just don't expect it to featheredge. That is outside the proper context of the product.

Most folks think of seam sealer as happening after all priming and sanding. Priming over 8308 with a primer-filler then sanding that is fine and gives best results. Allwill might not be using the brand of epoxy primer which can also serve as a primer-filler, and with the prep as it is theres no call for epoxy primer since it is for clean bare steel.

A diligent session with a decent spot blaster might change that. Frankly if it were mine I might toss fender in bed and go hunt up a sandblasting facility who could handle a small job with bed on and tarp over cab. Then a repair with epoxy primer as the foundation could be performed and have a sporting chance against the elements. Blasting is all that stands in the way of taking the high road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I agree sandblasting would be the best and I could do that as I sandblasted my 52 in the driveway. I have a sandblaster and sand and a compressor to handle. The fender would be easy. I would just mask off the area and only sandblast the flange. The truck bed side could also be easily done buy masking and just doing the flange area. I would just have to cover the entire truck.

If I am going to do all that I should look at the left side and remove that side and do both sides at the same time. One problem is this is the wrong time of the year to start this. It could get too cold to paint the epoxy primer. My garage is not heated and the last time I painted in the garage it was a mess and had to cover everything. Easier to do outside. I painted the truck a a plastic tent which as long been taken down and thrown away.
For this small job I will just do outside, primer and color. Wet sand and buff. I use single stage, no clear coat.
I don't think I will ever paint a car with base coat / clear coat again.
 
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