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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1930 Ford coupe. For safety, since the gas tank will be in the trunk, I would like to seal the trunk from the passenger compartment. I have 1X1 thin wall steel tube and 18 gauge sheet steel. Sealing the top and bottom would not be a problem but how could I seal the sides against the body without having it "telegraph" to the outside of the car?
Thanks in advance, Bob
 

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Keep the metal about an 1/8" away and use some kind of flexible seam sealer.
This is my best "guess".

A fella I know used panel bond to close window openings in the back of panel van's doors and ghost lines were present in the paint. That's why I mention flexible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Strikes my as being over thought, Ford and other makers put their pick up fuel tanks behind the seat for many years. But they did keep the filler pipe and vents outside the cab.

Bogie
You are probably right about the over thinking part. My first vehicle was a 52 chevy pickup and didn't care in the least about the tank being behind the seat. But back then I was invincible as I'm sure we all were. Now i'm old and most likely being too cautious. If there is no good way it's not going to stop me from driving it. I've been a good boy lately so maybe I still some of that invincibility left. Bob
 

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Inevitably you spill fuel while filling. Venting the tank outside is easy enough. Probably putting the tank in a sealed compartment isn’t the best plan. But a fire wall and fire suppression system is a good idea. I‘d take this to be fire resistant to the point of buying enough time to evacuate the vehicle not to necessarily save the vehicle. The factory fire wall is designed like this given all the holes for wiring and mechanicals the best it can do is buy time.

A totally sealed compartment would essentially be a potential bomb collecting gasses. You would have to be sure that no wiring penetrated the compartment as so demonstrated by TWA 800. And gasoline is far more volatile than Jet A.

Bogie
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A fire wall would have been a better term for me to use (thanks). The plan was to have a nice carpeted trunk and a slip ,spill, was always a big concern; not just from me but if I loaned it to someone and they were not extra careful. The fire wall was more for an accident or some other calamity to not let gas into the passenger compartment. The filler in the trunk would be a lot easier but the more thought that goes into it doesn't seem to be a good way to handle it. I wouldn't mind s screw on cap between the back window and trunk ( passenger or drivers side) but there doesn't look like quite enough flat area. A flush mount lid is looking like the way to go. Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If I interpreted it right I read to run a sealed cap and a vent line to under the car to get the vapors out but the smell of gas..... definitely stinks. Driving the coupe is supposed to be fun and smelling gas would not be fun. I put a flip up vent in the cowl where the original gas filler was so now I have that section of sheet metal with the gas cap. I checked the spot between the back window and trunk again and I think I can graft in the gas cap and not have it look like a wart on an ant. Should I run a piece of rubber hose between the gas cap and the tank? And again, thanks to everyone for your help.
Bob
 

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In my 87 V10(squarebody w tbi) I fit a 72 eec tank with very little modification to the cab.

I have a series of pcv valves that act as tip over valves and vent valves. I have my lines ran so that on my side or on my roof the fuel cant spill out. This required me having the vent lines run from the ds to the ps then back to the ds before going below the tank.

The pcv valves work as rollover valves by being upside down so they still fully vent when the thing is upright. They slow fuel but wont completly stop it in the event of a roll so I ran the lines to use gravity and make fuel losses

The vent valves are upright and it takes around 3psi to push them up briefly when sitting. When the engine is running the pcv valves vibrate and get bumped and vent that way.

When filling I can lift 2 flexible hoses 120 degrees to have 2 of 3 venting pcv valves "open" which aids filling faster.

I built a bed with a overbuilt headache rack to fully protect the tank from s

My mid engine 94 s10 pile has the tank under the raised floor. Filling through a large door by the passengers feet. But I plan on still using pcv valves to vent and act as rollover protection. Running a single mostly vertical line from the passenger side to drivers side above the tank then going below the tank on the passenger side.
 
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