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How can it go faster?
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Discussion Starter #1
Problem: 215 Buick Aluminum Block V8 has a crack in the block from one freeze plug to another (about 3 inches long) It never interefered with the oil or cylinders at all and only has water jacket behind the aluminum. I think that a shop could weld this crack and new freeze plugs could be installed. What do you all think? The cylinders near the crack actually have about 80 lbs of compression. (Low I know but the motor hasn't ran in years).

Is there something I am missing? Gonna check with some local shops tomorrow afternoon. (too late tonight)

:D
 

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You mean the crack you can see...

Pass, really unless it's an ultra rare original block that you are willing to sink piles of cash into to possibly repair and sleeve and weld and...:drunk:

It would have to be very special...or your a bored machinist looking for a project to practice on?:confused:
 

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How can it go faster?
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Discussion Starter #3
This is not your ordinary block. The water jacket actually surrounds the pistons. The crack only is between the exterior and the water jacket. In essence, it is hollow behind the crack. The crack doesn't interefere with the pistons at all. Note: the crack is no bigger than 1/32 inch. Not a gaping hole or anything.

One more fact. The serial numbers on the engine match those of the car. Original motor.
 

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Any competent welding shop should be able to fix that crack. Fortunately, the block is aluminum and fairly easy to repair....especially an outside crack such as that.

It would be a good idea to have the block pressure tested after they do the repair. May as well be certain that there are no more.

Worse case scenario.....you clean it up real spiffee and .......
 

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Hotrodders.com Moderator
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I would have it pinned with lock-n-stitch style pins. Probably the castmaster type pin, although L series might do the trick.

No welding, a solid repair, and pretty much invisible if prepped properly.
 

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How can it go faster?
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Discussion Starter #7
NAIRB, more info on these pins you speak of please....(lock and stitch and others).....
 

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Normally, aluminum is fairly easy to repair. I don't weld, but my husband does. Shouldn't be too hard to fix.

Neat coffee table, by the way!
 

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How can it go faster?
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Discussion Starter #10
thanx for the input all...got a good referral to a local shop....$50 and they said to drop it off Monday....gonna do it. I got it in the back of the truck and took it down so they could actually see it.

Nice coffee table!! :) Are those bottles of wine in the middle cylinders??
 

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block

Doc here::pimp:

Why save it at all?

215's ought to be a dime a dozen in a bone-yard, for a good one,and since you indicated compression was around 80, would indicate other problems......I'd spend your money on new rebuild parts on a fresh bone-yard block.

Doc :pimp:
 

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CLICK ON MY AVATAR
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Sorry to highjack the thread guys
doc,
I know you have alot of knowledge and I need to pick you brain.Can you give me your opinion of what initial timing should be for a 1994 gm crate motor.350 small block,edelbrock 600 carb,rams horn manifold super mild cam..you can barely hear it.cast iron heads.real basic motor.guys on the left are telling me 8* guys on the right are telling me 14*.got an opinion???
 

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How can it go faster?
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Discussion Starter #13
docvette,
I have been debating your exact question over and over in my mind. There are two reasons that I desire to keep the current motor. (1) The entire car was Grandpa's before he died. He bought it in 61' off of the showroom floor. That makes me second owner. (2) The serial numbers on the block match those of the car. That makes this specific engine important in my eyes.

PS. Gettin it welded early next week for $50.

PSS. I doubt batman needs 14* timing. I run my 350 at about 7-8* timing. Good luck. Back in the day, we just timed it by ear, drove it, adjusted it, drove it, adjusted it and then had it dialed in good at that point!!
 

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Ideally you want your welder to have access to a dyeglo tank to look for cracks, eyeball isn't good enough. I second stitching it with studs and drill out the crack ends, a lot less distortion than welding.

http://www.locknstitch.com/Metal_Stitching.htm
 

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I am a welder by trade and I can tell you this, welding any kind of casting requires a lot of work. It must be pre-heated and post-heated to avoid making the crack worse. If the correct temps are not maintained it will just make it worse and ruin your block. Make sure you are having an experienced and reputable welder do the work for you. Most machine shops that I have dealt with do not have any one that can do it properly. Just make sure you check around and find some one who can do it. Trust me 50 bucks is not going to do it right. I am a welder in the Navy and by all means I don't know everything, I would just hate to see you lose an original block that has a family history. Later


The Wolf
 

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Timing

batman09 said:
Sorry to highjack the thread guys
doc,
I know you have alot of knowledge and I need to pick you brain.Can you give me your opinion of what initial timing should be for a 1994 gm crate motor.350 small block,edelbrock 600 carb,rams horn manifold super mild cam..you can barely hear it.cast iron heads.real basic motor.guys on the left are telling me 8* guys on the right are telling me 14*.got an opinion???
Doc here:pimp:

In My opinion, Set your initial timing at 8...My 78's are all set at 8 and work OK with it. The 80 Vette Requires 4 (for smog) so that is where it sits although it's doggy at times.

It should not detonate at 8 while your dialing it in, and second, If it feels too boggy, you always have the option to bump it up a little at a time to 14...

But Starting at 14 may or may not invite detonation.

If given a choice always start low...and go from there.

Doc :pimp:
 

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Keepsakes...

Magikal said:
docvette,
I have been debating your exact question over and over in my mind. There are two reasons that I desire to keep the current motor. (1) The entire car was Grandpa's before he died. He bought it in 61' off of the showroom floor. That makes me second owner. (2) The serial numbers on the block match those of the car. That makes this specific engine important in my eyes.

PS. Gettin it welded early next week for $50.

PSS. I doubt batman needs 14* timing. I run my 350 at about 7-8* timing. Good luck. Back in the day, we just timed it by ear, drove it, adjusted it, drove it, adjusted it and then had it dialed in good at that point!!

Doc here :pimp:

I understand fully, I have a 1961 mint condition Fiat Convertable with an over run engine on its 7 th engine rebuild......I have a new 350 Crate I would really want to put into it....

The Car was my Pop's favorite plaything up until his death in 1993 when I aquired it ...so there both the car and engine have sat , under a tarp , in the corner or the shop...still undicided on what to do with "Dad's Toy"...

Doc :pimp:


This is the nose of the Fiat
other side of Toyota..Circa
about ...95
 

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How can it go faster?
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Discussion Starter #18
thanx wolf. I did indeed seek a reputable welder. Not living in a large city, there are only a couple of places around here that even do aluminum welding. I took the block in and let them look at it and they didn't seem concerned with the issue. The crack isn't large or in a bad location and only is involved with the water jacket, not the cylinders. You really would have to see this set up to fully understand. I tried to take some pics but my digital camera sucks at up close pics. :(

Life goes on.
 
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