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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, browsing the web and I read somewhere about a technique of skim coating entire panels with body filler and block sanding for a super straight finish. From what I gathered, all repairs are made using the traditional body filler and sanding methods but then the whole panel is skimmed with a thin layer of body filler. Was I reading this correctly? If so, can someone explain in a little more detail how this is done? ie: what condition do the panels have to be in to warrant using this method? Do you sand off all the filler leaving all the lows filled in?

Any info. would be appreciated.
Thanks
 

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Shop Owner And Troll Hunter
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2,643 Posts
You pretty well got it. Have the panel as straight as you can, then skim the whole thing. Sand using a long board by hand. It`s lots of hard work, you need to eat lots of beans, and your arm will get BIG by the time your done. You will have perfect panels. Lots of time And patience.

Good Luck


[ May 22, 2003: Message edited by: troy-curt ]

[ May 22, 2003: Message edited by: troy-curt ]</p>
 

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Pontiac Knowledge Base Editor
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167 Posts
Old school but it works. Now a days we use a polyester surfacer it builds up fast and sands off easy. And just a note the bigger the block you use to sand the better the end results. I like an 8" block myself.
 

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Just a firefighter
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324 Posts
OK, I don't mean to jump in the middle of someone elses question but what if you have a curved surface like a fat '40's fender??? Can the same process be used with shorter boards??
I have the same problem just its a curved fender not a panel and I have to finish repairs started by someone else.
 

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Pontiac Knowledge Base Editor
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For a curved surface like your talking about I would use a flexable block style sander, about 10" long. Sand in in a criss cross pattern and you should be fine.
 

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Hotrodders.com Moderator
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This isn't a job for a person that gets discouraged easily or a beginner...or both. It's very time consuming, perfection comes with a price. Try doing this with a damaged panel, you'll realize what you're getting into.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Originally posted by dinger:
<strong>It's very time consuming, perfection comes with a price. Try doing this with a damaged panel, you'll realize what you're getting into.</strong><hr></blockquote>

dinger,
Yeah I understand but hey, I'm willing to pay that price(not being sarcastic) :)

Thanks everyone for the replies. The car I'm working on has relatively round panels so I'll most definetly pick up some flexible sanding blocks. Eastwood has some nice assorted sized ones.
 
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