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Beginning bodywork

deadbodyman I have seen that vid clip on you tube and went on to purchase the DVD David put out. EXCELLENT!!!!!!!
Not exactly what I would recommend as a starting tutorial for someone wanting to get into collision repair, but if you want to learn the foundation of metalwork, do it on the cheap (mostly hand tools and inexpensive machines), and learn some SOLID skills, this video is perfect.
I am not related nor do I get a fee for plugging for him, lol, But David is a down to earth guy. He hangs out on the Metalmeet forum and is quick to answer questions, or help a newbie get started.
I have a shop full of mid price machines and have found a stump and wooden mallet to do just as good on some unusual shaping. Plus a lot of guys can't figure out what to do if the piece they are working on is too big to get into a machine.
I also refined my gas welding skills and would rather join two panels like that than Mig welding them. The "cleanup" on a gas weld is minimal compared to what I have done with a mig.
Best thing about it was I got a little better understanding of what to expect from your applied action on a sheet of metal.
I like the hands on approach, and let me tell you it is not only gratifying, but addictive once you get the hang of it.
Nothing but good to say about the DVD or David.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
JE,Ive been doing heavy collision for many years,restos,and making my own patch panels with slight contours with my English wheel,break and bead roller.Making my own rockers is no problem and got my nick name for doing the roughest,rusted out cars that no one would touch.I concidered myself an exellent bodyman,that is until last weekend when I went to a metal shaping class in N. Ga. and realized just how much more I have to learn...I joined "Metal Meet.com" as soon as I got home at the instructors request (Pat)I really don't mind being the student for a change because thats exactly what I am. Now I'm in the process of acquiring plans for many other pieces of equipment I intend on building,since Im on a budget.I met a guy right here in Augusta (bob) from that site and was invited over to his shop to check out his homemade equipment...I gotta tell you I am impressed.Not only by the talent but by how friendly and helpful everyone has been.Later on this week I'll post some pics of the homemade equipment Bob made.Another guy in N. Ga. has been a great help (David)Hes sending plans for a tubing bender,I'll post them too if anyone is interested.My first project will be rear fenders for my 48 plymouth....Done the right way this time...It must break their hearts to have someone paint over this kind of work...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TI3BrTKfSvA
 

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still learning

deadbodyman I think its great to hear someone who has done this for years admit to being able to learn new things.
I have tinkered with hot rods and old trucks for years myself, but mostly as a "parts swapper" and certainly NOT as a living.. I am just getting into the sheet metal aspect of it and boy do I have a LOT to learn.
I had to laugh at the origin of your screen-name. I seem to gravitate to the most rusted, clapped out, hopeless projects myself.
Its good to meet someone with similar interests. Or as my Sweetie likes to say " issues" lol
You are certainly pointing us all in the right direction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
LOL, My 48 was so rotted out I named it "Metal Illness" funny,now I realize its me who has the Metal Illness ....Careful guys,its extremely contagious...I'd be very interested in hearing from anyone with the same Illness,mabee your remedies (pics) It doesnt matter if its an ashtray or an airplane,we can ALL learn something...
 

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Interesting links DBM. You’re not the only one who can learn more as I too learn something new everyday. Fabricating the lower valance on a 64 Chevy pickup to eliminate the bumper was a sort of an easy challenge. More challenging is trying to repair panels that were previously repaired by individuals that had no clue as the consequences of their lack of skills as I’ve moved on to another project. Correcting the repairs done on a 57 Ford wagon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
CJ,I think you'll find that one of the best parts about restoring cars is the better you get in one field the more another one opens up.Ive been doing body & paint since 14-15yrs old and at times it got pretty rough,every time I felt like I was making progress I'd run into somebody that was so far ahead of me I felt like I was wasting my time and I'd never know all there is to know.Now ,I realize thats the whole reason I kept doing it,theres always something new and a new challenge is on every car.It never gets boring.Many jobs I've done cost ME money but I learned.I've never done this work for the money,its nice but not why I do it. I enjoy it...Like just about every member here does.
 

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If you think I'm in this for the money, you haven't figured me out. I didn't make a whole lot on that 64 Chevy and the 57 Ford I'm being compensated with a rotted out body from a 63 chevy truck to restore. Hardly profitable. For me it's more a challenge to correct and teach these guys it's not impossible to get perfect results no matter what you start with. They're starting to see that.
 

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Sorry, I miss understood your last sentence. Yes we are on the same page, it seems I never make what I should on the work I do. It often costs me money too when I haven't forseen some eliment or was misinformed on the project I'm working on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
No problem CJ,When it comes to giving a price I got a lot to learn too.If I give someone a break its always at my expense.This metal shaping wont ever be profitable just a blast to learn...Theres just no way I could ever make a 1/4 cheaper than I can buy them for but it'll be nice to be able to make things that aren't available.like customs ....
 

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Well you amaze me with what you do, I wish I had your talents with metal... I am afraid of all the rust... maybe my next project will have more rust to deal with, so once again I will need my buddy to tell m how it is done :welcome:
 

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We a willingness to learn and an open mind you can do quite a bit with very simple tools.

I found a combination of a autobody school text book and some instructional DVD's you can do some serious learning on your own. The autobody text book from the late 60's talked about how metal moves and why you need to work the metal in a certain way. The videos are somewhat boring, but filled with tiny tips on how to work the tools and concepts that might blow you mind away.

Here is a link to what I have done:

My website
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
lilgreenjeepyj said:
Im trying to learn/teach myself as much as I can about it. :D Im trying to find as much information as I can get. Any suggestions on a book or two?
when I wanted to learn about the computer a few months ago I went to the library.I spent all day there,theres a lot of books on body work...take your time and feel free to ask for help,thats what the librarians are there for..I couldnt even figure out how to find a book ,its been that long since I was there.
 
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