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Discussion Starter #1
I am going to be using a solid lifter camshaft in my small block 350 that I'm building for my work pickup. Will I need to modify the block (hydraulic flat tappet) to accept a solid lifter setup? Also the cam that I chose (Comp Cams XS256S) recommends 1.88 inch lifters and 7.8 inch pushrods. The only problem here is that the pushrods they recommend are $114 a set. They sell a set that are 7.794 inches long for 30 bucks and I was wondering if using this set would cause any issues. I hope this cam is good for towing as well since it's the smallest solid flat tappet camshaft that comp sells.
 

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More for Less Racer
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You don't need to modify the block for the solid lifter set-up, just drop it in and go.
The 7.794" pushrods are only .006" of an inch shorter than 7.800" pushrods, that isn't enough to even worry about. If the 7.800" is the right length, using the 7.794" in their place poses no problem.
Make sure whatever pushrod you use is hardened, so that it has enough strength.
Comp recommends the better pushrods with a solid lifter cam because they figure anyone buying solids is going to REV IT UP, if you're never going to take it over 6500 rpm the cheaper pushrod will serve you just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You don't need to modify the block for the solid lifter set-up, just drop it in and go.
The 7.794" pushrods are only .006" of an inch shorter than 7.800" pushrods, that isn't enough to even worry about. If the 7.800" is the right length, using the 7.794" in their place poses no problem.
Make sure whatever pushrod you use is hardened, so that it has enough strength.
Comp recommends the better pushrods with a solid lifter cam because they figure anyone buying solids is going to REV IT UP, if you're never going to take it over 6500 rpm the cheaper pushrod will serve you just fine.
I will probably never even take it past 6000, except when I'm passing someone and I'm hauling a huge load.
 

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Plainly put, the $30 PR is going to fail and cause you more problems than it's worth.
You don't need to spend $114 on them either but the $30 ones are probably a bomb waiting to happen even at 6000.
I'd also wait to purchase those until you need them after you measure them.
 

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Once measured you can probably pick up a correct length set on Ebay. Ijust got a set of Manleys for around $50. Like Ericnova said, make sure a good quality hardened pushrod is used.
 

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I am going to be using a solid lifter camshaft in my small block 350 that I'm building for my work pickup. Will I need to modify the block (hydraulic flat tappet) to accept a solid lifter setup? Also the cam that I chose (Comp Cams XS256S) recommends 1.88 inch lifters and 7.8 inch pushrods. The only problem here is that the pushrods they recommend are $114 a set. They sell a set that are 7.794 inches long for 30 bucks and I was wondering if using this set would cause any issues. I hope this cam is good for towing as well since it's the smallest solid flat tappet camshaft that comp sells.
Heads, pistons, induction system are what?

Bogie
 

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Use the Comp Cams 7.800" pushrods that cost $114. . They are the Comp Cams High Tech pushrods that are hardened chromoly steel. Don't use shorter pushrods because solid lifter pushrod seats are .020" deeper than hydraulic lifter pushrod seats or you will screw up the valve train geometry. Hydraulic lifters don't have that problem with a +/- .050" adjustment range.

Use GM 3927142 valve springs or Pioneer / Elgin RV 1943X and stock retainers. . Those valve springs set up at 110 LB at 1.700" and will not beat out the exhaust valve seats out on no lead gasoline. Chevrolet used those springs with the SB Chevy Z28 and fuel injection engines with the 30-30 solid lifter camshaft.
 

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Summit 152123 heads (basically Dart Iron Eagle s/s 165), Edelbrock 2101 intake, 800 cfm q jet, 9.23:1 compression with D.S.S E series 8 cc flat top pistons
OK good stuff yeah this'll turn 6 grand and at that point you want to use the good stuff. Not that less expensive can't go there now and then but if you're a regular vistor to 6 grand the springs will get tired quckly if you don't use those that are recommeded or an equivalent. The springs are driving the push rods since you're starting with a spring that has more resistance to getting tired the push rods will have to work harder so thin wall 1010 is out the window.

I'd also recommend full roller rockers, 6000 RPM is mighty hard on the ball and socket rocker it is tough to keep them lubricated and cooled for any length of time at those RPMs so they fry themselves lose their heat treat, fatigue and break. 6000 is a different animal even from 5500, it is really hard on parts so you have to select into it if the engine is to stay together.

Bogie
 

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Are those the same as the infamous "Z28" spring?
The GM 3927142 valve springs were used with the GM 3849346 "30-30" camshaft in Z28 Camaros and 365 HP /327 fuel injection engines in Corvettes. The so called Z28, fuel injection or 30-30 camshaft also used GM 5231585 edge orifice lifters in order to control excessive oiling to the valve covers at high RPM. The 30-30 cam and edge orifice lifters have been discontinued by GM. Crower 66900-16 lifters are correct replacements for the GM edge orifice lifters. Several cam grinders offer replacements for the 30-30 camshaft.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
OK good stuff yeah this'll turn 6 grand and at that point you want to use the good stuff. Not that less expensive can't go there now and then but if you're a regular vistor to 6 grand the springs will get tired quckly if you don't use those that are recommeded or an equivalent. The springs are driving the push rods since you're starting with a spring that has more resistance to getting tired the push rods will have to work harder so thin wall 1010 is out the window.

I'd also recommend full roller rockers, 6000 RPM is mighty hard on the ball and socket rocker it is tough to keep them lubricated and cooled for any length of time at those RPMs so they fry themselves lose their heat treat, fatigue and break. 6000 is a different animal even from 5500, it is really hard on parts so you have to select into it if the engine is to stay together.

Bogie
Thanks for the great info as always. This will very rarely see 6k. Do you know if this will be a good lugger at low RPMs too?
 

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The Comp Cams XS256S solid lifter cam will be good at low RPM but why would you want a solid lifter camshaft for low RPM operation?

If you want good low RPM torque and avoid lifter pump up and valve float at high RPM, you no longer have to used a solid lifter camshaft. You can use a hydraulic lifter camshaft of your choice with Comp Cams Pro Magnum 858-16 short travel lifters.
Those lifters have only .050" plunger travel, set at .004" preload and are adjusted similar to solid lifters.

The short travel lifters cannot pump up and float the valves because they have nowhere to pump up to. I use them in every engine I have built since the late 1970s.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The Comp Cams XS256S solid lifter cam will be good at low RPM but why would you want a solid lifter camshaft for low RPM operation?

If you want good low RPM torque and avoid lifter pump up and valve float at high RPM, you no longer have to used a solid lifter camshaft. You can use a hydraulic lifter camshaft of your choice with Comp Cams Pro Magnum 858-16 short travel lifters.
Those lifters have only .050" plunger travel, set at .004" preload and are adjusted similar to solid lifters.

The short travel lifters cannot pump up and float the valves because they have nowhere to pump up to. I use them in every engine I have built since the late 1970s.
I want a solid lifter camshaft because it has higher lift.. Plus I just like the idea of having a solid lifter camshaft because of the more aggressive ramp of the lobe. That aggressive ramp will give a slight power and torque advantage over a hydraulic lifter.
 

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The only advantage solid lifter camshafts have over hydraulic lifter camshafts is that solid lifters cannot pump up at high RPM and float the valves. Limited travel Hydraulic lifters were introduced in 1969 and have eliminated that advantage.

With solid lifters you will have oiling problems. Too much oil pumped to the valve covers and reduced oil flow to the rod and main bearings at high RPM. The Crower 66900-16 edge orifice lifters will solve that problem but you will need to use full roller rockers with edge orifice lifters because very little oil gets to the rocker arms and you will likely burn out and seize the stock stamped steel rocker arm pivot balls.

The Comp Cams Pro Magnum 858-16 limited travel hydraulic lifters solve all those problems. They operate like solid lifters by not pumping up and floating the valves at high RPM, they supply metered oil to the rocker arms, they maintain full oil pressure to the rod and main bearings and you can use any camshaft specifications with the Pro Magnum 858-16 hydraulic lifters that you can use with a solid lifter camshaft. You can get a hydraulic lifter camshaft that will have as much valve lift as any solid lifter camshaft and will produce just as much performance if it is used with Comp Cams Pro Magnum 858-16 lifters with the proper valve springs.
 

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I invent stupid usernames
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Discussion Starter #16
The only advantage solid lifter camshafts have over hydraulic lifter camshafts is that solid lifters cannot pump up at high RPM and float the valves. Limited travel Hydraulic lifters were introduced in 1969 and have eliminated that advantage.

With solid lifters you will have oiling problems. Too much oil pumped to the valve covers and reduced oil flow to the rod and main bearings at high RPM. The Crower 66900-16 edge orifice lifters will solve that problem but you will need to use full roller rockers with edge orifice lifters because very little oil gets to the rocker arms and you will likely burn out and seize the stock stamped steel rocker arm pivot balls.

The Comp Cams Pro Magnum 858-16 limited travel hydraulic lifters solve all those problems. They operate like solid lifters by not pumping up and floating the valves at high RPM, they supply metered oil to the rocker arms, they maintain full oil pressure to the rod and main bearings and you can use any camshaft specifications with the Pro Magnum 858-16 hydraulic lifters that you can use with a solid lifter camshaft. You can get a hydraulic lifter camshaft that will have as much valve lift as any solid lifter camshaft and will produce just as much performance if it is used with Comp Cams Pro Magnum 858-16 lifters with the proper valve springs.
These solid lifters from comp that I found have oil metering as well. I, for some odd reason, just like the idea of a solid lifter camshaft better than a hydraulic. Sure it's more maintenance but I enjoy that kind of thing
 

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These solid lifters from comp that I found have oil metering as well. I, for some odd reason, just like the idea of a solid lifter camshaft better than a hydraulic. Sure it's more maintenance but I enjoy that kind of thing
The last engine I had with solid lifters was a 1965 327 CI / 365 HP over the counter Chevrolet engine in a '59 Impala. It was a new short block less the camshaft. I installed a 1965 327/365 Fuel injection camshaft, known as the "30-30 cam", part number 3849346. That cam used the Chevrolet "edge orifice" solid lifters, part number 5231585 that restricted oil flow to the valve covers. The edge orifice lifters are discontinued by GM but are being reproduced by Crower, part number 66900-16 . If I wanted to use a solid lifter camshaft, those are the lifters I would use.

The old school 1957-1960 Chevrolet "097" Duntov solid lifter cam used conventional solid lifters that would shoot oil over the fenders when you adjusted the valves. We pushed .040" stainless steel telephone company spinning wire in the pushrods in order to reduce the oil flow to the rocker arms and valve cover area. Some people used pipe cleaners, but I worked for the telephone company and had access to all the spinning wire I wanted.

You will not have oil flow problems with conventional solid lifters if you keep the engine speed below 4500 RPM.
 

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The last engine I had with solid lifters was a 1965 327 CI / 365 HP over the counter Chevrolet engine in a '59 Impala. It was a new short block less the camshaft. I installed a 1965 327/365 Fuel injection camshaft, known as the "30-30 cam", part number 3849346. That cam used the Chevrolet "edge orifice" solid lifters, part number 5231585 that restricted oil flow to the valve covers. The edge orifice lifters are discontinued by GM but are being reproduced by Crower, part number 66900-16 . If I wanted to use a solid lifter camshaft, those are the lifters I would use.

The old school 1957-1960 Chevrolet "097" Duntov solid lifter cam used conventional solid lifters that would shoot oil over the fenders when you adjusted the valves. We pushed .040" stainless steel telephone company spinning wire in the pushrods in order to reduce the oil flow to the rocker arms and valve cover area. Some people used pipe cleaners, but I worked for the telephone company and had access to all the spinning wire I wanted.

You will not have oil flow problems with conventional solid lifters if you keep the engine speed below 4500 RPM.

I provided the incorrect part number for Crower edge orifice solid lifters. The correct part number is 66909-16 .
 

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Discussion Starter #19
OK good stuff yeah this'll turn 6 grand and at that point you want to use the good stuff. Not that less expensive can't go there now and then but if you're a regular vistor to 6 grand the springs will get tired quckly if you don't use those that are recommeded or an equivalent. The springs are driving the push rods since you're starting with a spring that has more resistance to getting tired the push rods will have to work harder so thin wall 1010 is out the window.

I'd also recommend full roller rockers, 6000 RPM is mighty hard on the ball and socket rocker it is tough to keep them lubricated and cooled for any length of time at those RPMs so they fry themselves lose their heat treat, fatigue and break. 6000 is a different animal even from 5500, it is really hard on parts so you have to select into it if the engine is to stay together.

Bogie
This is kind of a late reply but do you think this combo will pull 330 hp and 420 torque?
 

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This is kind of a late reply but do you think this combo will pull 330 hp and 420 torque?
I would expect that it would produce numbers pretty close to what you're looking for on an engine dyno corrected to STP given your original list of goodies. Given the Vortecish style Summit head maybe a few more ponies a little higher in the RPM range.

Bogie
 
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