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Discussion Starter #1
Q.1 Should I add sound insulation to my doors? Do I glue it to the outside skin, inside the door or should it go inside the door and attached to the inner panel. Note that I am trying to retain the metal door look on my Ford F-1 pickup.

Q.2 What adhesive should I use to attach the sound insulation? I will be using a rag pad with a platic coating for the dry surfaces (not in the door) and the metal coated plastic stuff for the door panels.

Q. 3 I have made some roll and tuck that I want to glue onto thin wooden door panels. What is the best spray on adhesive for upholstery applications?
 

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At a loss for words
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I'm trying to get the pictures in my head, but I really can't. Do you have door panels that can be removed? If so, why not just get some Dynamat (or similar brand) and put that inside the door, on the out side panels. It's all hiden by the door panel then. There is also a company that produces something called V-Block (or something like that). It is a multistep, paint/filler type material that can probably be painted over. You may want to look at that also.
Do you have any pictures you can provide me?
 

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sounds good to me. i use the 3m adhesive. i put felt all over my floor and the back of the cab as well. shot sound deadener all over underneath too. it's alot quieter. but as usual, i cant give an honest assesment because i made major changes elsewhere, like eliminating glass packs and installing mufflers.

[ March 12, 2003: Message edited by: bullheimer ]</p>
 

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Q1: Why not both the inner and outer door skins? Can't hurt to do it a little heavier.. Check out <a href="http://dynamat.com/" target="_blank">Dynamat</a>'s Automotive door applications, they say to do it on both.

I think Dynamat is pretty pricey and there are alternatives, what were you planning on using?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I guess my finess of the english language could use some finess. So let me explain a little better.

My old pickup door has a hole in the inside panel about 10"x 18" that accesses the window crank stuff inside the door. The access hole is covered by thin panel that was originally covered by some sort of vinyl of its day and was screwed into place. I have made some 1/8" thick plywood covers for the access hole and have made some tuck and roll that I want to glue onto the covers, wrap over the edges and glue the backside down. I want a spray glue that will permanently hold the material front and back. I need recommendations for this.

I also want to sound insulate the doors. As you know, they are wet inside because water drains down the exterior glass and into the hollow door cavity where it drains outside the bottom of the door. I can't use the pressed fiber rag material in the door because it would get wet and weigh about 3 tons and would quilckly rot my doors away and create one hell of a smell in the process. So I will use something like dynamat as an insulation material. To eliminate the drumming effect of the large door panels, I have already coated them with about 3/8" of bondo on the inside and this works well, but there is still wind noise etc.. I now need to know what sort of glue to use to attach the dynamat.

Some new car applications put the insulation between the cover panel and the inner door framework (on the interior side of the inner door frame). I can't do this because I want to keep my door surfaces "all metal" except for the access covers. So an option would be to paste the dynamat on the inner door panel, but on the cavity side of the door hollow...or it could go on the bondo surface of the outer door skin which is inside the door cavity. So which is better, both are in the cavity, but one is on the outside skin and the other is on the inside skin.?

Hey, I know there is no right answer to this, just tell me what you think works best and why. Thanks. Tom
 

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Hey, F1

Good luck on your project. I'm reading a really, REALLY cool book about custom interior work - "Custom Auto Interiors" by Don Taylor & Ron Mangus.

First, they say use (contact cement) 3M brand ONLY. Spray a LIGHT coat on the back of your covering and on the front of your panel and let them dry to touch before putting them together. Then, when you begin covering, don't press anything into place until you've got it all where you want it - that way you'll be able to pull material back up and re-place it if you want to. Once it's exactly where you want, press firmly and it'll STAY.

If you're using any closed-cell foam, be sure to LIGHTLY sand the skin OFF before spraying with the 3M contact cemant, or it won't stick for long.

If you're going for a fuller, softer, puffy/gathered, tuck ... and if you're using polyester/Dacron padding ... trim the poly carefully around the edges of your panel (any bumps or lumps will "telegraph" through the leather or vinyl) and spray the cement ONLY around the edges - not all over/across everything.

Hope that's some help, bro'.

Alan Horvath
<a href="http://AlanHorvath.com/" target="_blank">http://AlanHorvath.com/</a>
Acoustic Rock ... for real.
 

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Dynamat already has it's own adhesive (or maybe it's put on with a blow dryer....) Either way, you don't need anything extra. If you want something extra, I would agree with horvath on what he said.
 

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F1 - I know what you're talking about. When I said to do both sides, I meant on the cavity side on each so that the deadener would be totally invisible from the passenger compartment.

I would think that just doing the outer skin (from the inside of the door) would give you the biggest benefits. But you're right, you want to keep those drainage holes clear.

I'm going to be doing the same project soon, on my '52 Chevy. I've got something called "ice shield" used for roofing. It's about 1/8" thick, flexible asphalt kind of material. It's so cheap (compared to Dynamat) that it's worth a try. :)
 

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Originally posted by 1meancuda:
<strong>Dynamat already has it's own adhesive (or maybe it's put on with a blow dryer....) Either way, you don't need anything extra. If you want something extra, I would agree with horvath on what he said.</strong><hr></blockquote>

It better have the glue already there at $1,000,000/squre inch!!!!!
 

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F-1, I have used spray on undercoating on the back side of the door skin. Two or three coats do a great job of reducing noise level and and protects the metal from all the moisture the door is exposed to. Let each coat dry over night before applying. You may have noticed a half-harted attempt of factory application to reduce the tinny noise of that large piece of sheet metal. The small print on the rattle cans of undercoating say not to use on interiors, but I have never encountered any problems, but I also have not set one on fire either. May have some big time toxic fumes then.

Trees
 

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F1, I use a product called Big Stick in a rattle can. It holds up well in the high temp enviroment of vehicle interiors. 3-M products are hard to beat in every way but price. Their vinly top spray is awesome, but I don't like the way it sprays and you had better have your pannel cover in the right place when you put it on because it is a bear to reposition!!

Trees
 
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