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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks. I'm in the process of bringing my old 41 Chev out of mothball and to my surprise it still looks pretty good.
In the years it's been setting in the garage there are a few places that I would like to freshen up or fix and I'm curious about the how? I used all PPG stuff that was available at the time (late 80s).
This is what I did/used
1. Stipped down to the bare metal and used metal etch prior to sealing
2. Sealed with DP40 with a reducer as suggested in the directions
3. Did all my body work and resealed with the previous concoction
4. I used what I think they called KS 200 primer/surfacer was applied
5. Reseal just prior to paint with DP40 and reducer
6. Painted with Laquer PPG in Wimbleton White

I really dont need to repaint the car but I would like to lose the gas filler neck, fill some of the holes in the firewall and theres some spots at the bottom of the passenger door that I want to address.

What paints are compatible with this old school stuff and what is the process to make all this happen. Sorry for the ignorance but I'm old school and all this BC/CC confuses me.

Thanks.......John

 

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That does look pretty good for an old lacquer. The dp epoxy and being keep inside probably helped a lot. I believe modern urethane paints are compatable over lacquer, but you are not suppose to use lacquer over any uncatalyzed enamel products. The thing I woiuld worry about how would the formula in a modern urethane paint blend and match? and will the gloss look different on the repaired panel if painted with urethane or enamel ? You could always apply a clear sealer to help prevent against possible compatability and blend a modern base into the existing color and clear the panel, if you can'r get any lacquer paint or don't want to use it. Lacquer is bottom of the barrel is far as durability, but believe putting on a sealer would help some, but the lacquer would still be under there. Maybe some of the older guys that have used more lacquer paints can give you some good advice on what would be best to do without a repaint. Lacquer was used very little when I got started and got told to dump all of the old lacquer paint at my first bodyshop job as they were only going to use centari enamel and chromabase base/clear at that time. If you can find some lacquer paint still, spotting some in and buffing probably would be the easiest I believe.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks 17, if I can match the shade, can I shoot a clear over the entire car to make the gloss more even?

Other than the spots that I mentioned, the paint really doesnt look any worse than when I first put it on other than it could stand a good buffing. We waxed it up real good before covering it up years ago and when we went to wash it yesterday the water still beaded up like a fresh wax.
 

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I don't see why you couldn't, some basecoats were lacquer based and cleared over and wimbelton white is a solid color, so no worry about metallics. I would think a sand with 800-1000 on the whole thing if you don't break through to the sealer anywhere. I'd wait for some others to chime in though, cause I am not positive on this one, like I said lacquer was on its way out when I started, and I only had to spray it once in tech school so I'd have some exposure to it.
 

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Just happened to read through some old posts, and people have advised against just clearing over the existing paint so it may not last real long, saying something to the effect that clears don't have great adhesion and do better by chemically adhesion to the freshly sprayed base. But its done all the time with base/clear and repairs where color is only sprayed on part of the panel and blended and the rest of the clear is over the old sanded clearcoat. These seem to last to me. At any rate, I'll bump you back up and hopefully some others will state their feelings on it.
 

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My neighbor has a Cadillac limo and he still had the quart of lacquer paint so I did some touch up with that a month ago, forgot how much I hated lacquer.

However in my opinion I would do your touch up with lacquer and be done with it.
My concern with a urethane over it would be melting the lacquer or softening it to a point where problems could arise during the paint process or down the road.
 

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White is a cheaper color too, so if you did go as far as wanting to clear it, I think applying more color wouldn't add a ton to the cost if you did go that far. But as long as you are that far we will soon have you stripping off the old lacquer and starting fresh. Want to keep it cheap and easy to spot in, I'd do as barry suggested and spot in some lacquer if you can find it these days.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys. I really dont want to strip this car down whent he paint still looks pretty darn good but I'm definately going to have some spots in need sof paint....hmmmmmmmmm I'll see if I can find some Laquer. Thanks again
 

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You can thank that old DP40 for how well the paint held up IMO. I agree on finding some lacquer to do spot repairs with or sand all the paint down and apply more epoxy primer and a urethane paint over the complete car. That model Chev sure is cool. I've got a convertible on the schedual at the end of this year or beginning of 07, the owner is hunting for some NOS rear fenders and one front fender-know where there's any? Bob
 
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