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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I received my Manely springs today and it said on the box to chamfer the ID of the springs to ensure adequate retainer clearance. It also recommended a tool which is a cone shaped arbor that holds cone shaped sand paper and appears to be used in either a mill or drill press. I can find surprisingly little info about this. Thought I could at least find a video or instructions regarding how this is done. I am hesitant to do this as I know if not done correctly can cause stress concentration points and spring failure. Some of the feedback I have received so far is nobody really does this unless there is fitment issue.

Any opinions on this?

Thanks!
 

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This is done on the end Inside Diameters (ID) of the springs to remove the sharp ground edges. These will cut into the inside spring seating area of the retainer, especially titanium retainers. It is also useful if you use an ID locator rather that a cup as a rest at the bottom of the spring typically for aluminum heads. It is nothing more than a deburring and chamfering operation to smooth and round the jagged, sharp edge on those inside or really any such edges you find. No gusto required as you do not want to get the spring steel hotter than it would see in normal operation as this risks changing the material properties where it is overheated. You don’t need go reach red hot in a spot to do this.

Manley’s description could be stated clearer than it is, but you know they saved on that expensive ink they didn’t use.

Bogie
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This is done on the end Inside Diameters (ID) of the springs to remove the sharp ground edges. These will cut into the inside spring seating area of the retainer, especially titanium retainers. It is also useful if you use an ID locator rather that a cup as a rest at the bottom of the spring typically for aluminum heads. It is nothing more than a deburring and chamfering operation to smooth and round the jagged, sharp edge on those inside or really any such edges you find. No gusto required as you do not want to get the spring steel hotter than it would see in normal operation as this risks changing the material properties where it is overheated. You don’t need go reach red hot in a spot to do this.

Manley’s description could be stated clearer than it is, but you know they saved on that expensive ink they didn’t use.

Bogie
Thanks again Bogie. I want to do this right. I am using the Manley Titanium retainers and the ID locator for the springs. These are all high dollar components and I want them to last. I will get some extra cones and practice on my used springs.
 

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I do it with a die grinder and sandpaper rolls, then polish with scotchbright cartridge rolls---only takes a couple minutes
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I do it with a die grinder and sandpaper rolls, then polish with scotchbright cartridge rolls---only takes a couple minutes
I have a die grinder that I use for porting and lots of sandpaper rolls. No scotchbright rolls however. What sand paper grit do you use? This method would reduce heat build up in spring I would think.
 

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Grit is about 120 or 180.
There are scotchbright cartridge rolls and wheels for a bench grinder---you can polish a spring or a valve to a mirror finish with those things.
 
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