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Hi all,

What would it take to swap a 454 from a mid-70's Chevy truck into my 1963 Rambler Classic 770? I don't have a huge budget and I am not a skilled fabricator by any means - just wondering how much is involved and if it's is feasible (pretty sure it's not totally practical). Thanks.
 

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not hard for the engine, that would be basic and you could easilly get springs for the extra weight.. the problem is in the torque tube rear end.. it's a coil over suspension, and it will need some fabrication to get a open differential to fit...
 

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Lucky11wh said:
Hi all,

What would it take to swap a 454 from a mid-70's Chevy truck into my 1963 Rambler Classic 770? I don't have a huge budget and I am not a skilled fabricator by any means - just wondering how much is involved and if it's is feasible (pretty sure it's not totally practical). Thanks.
(You're pretty right) :drunk:
I wouldnt do it and I LIKE to do wacky thing to Ramblers :p
If you decide to do it I would re-think the engine for sure...
You will have to do ALOT of fabrication and it will cost some dough..
Theres gotta be another way :pain:
 

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The good news is you have a 63 Classic. In 63 there was no V-8 for the Classic at first, but the more up-scale Ambassador used the same body with up-scale trim and AMC's first generation AMC V-8. It was only a 327, but external dimensions and weight aren't far from a big block Chevy. A smaller bore 287 was made available in the Classic in late 63 due to dealers complaining.

The six cylinder used in the 63 Classic sits directly on the crossmember, so you'll have to fabricate perches and mounts. There's plenty room under the hood of the Classic, and you can get a set of V-8 springs. You definitely need stronger springs in the front end -- otherwise the stock front suspension is fine. You'll want power steering also. It's not hard to mount a standard Chevy power steering box.

The rear suspension has to be changed along with the transmission, but you knew the tranny had to go. It's not hard to change the rear suspension, but takes some work. Keep the coil springs in their factory location. The spring seats bolt on top of the axle. Drill the tubes of the donor axle for the 3/8" fine thread bolts and use the original seats and rear springs. The shock mounts can probably be used also. The spring location makes it easy to air bag these cars, even on the front. They use regular coil springs with shocks mounted outside the springs, not coil overs. A Ford Explorer rear axle is about the right width and will have the same 5x4.5" bolt pattern as the front. You'll just need to locate the axle. Ladder bars are easy, but universal mount four links aren't much harder. The real trick and easy setup is to adapt a G-body "truck arm" kit from Hot Rods to Hell (http://www.hotrodstohell.net/truckarm/truckarm_gbody/truckarm_gbody.htm). Heck, a G-body axle is close to the right width also, but then you have that Chevy bolt pattern on the back, AMC/Chrysler/Ford on the front. I have that problem with my Jaguar rear axle, I just use dual pattern wheels.

The question is, how much work and money are you willing to put into the car? It's not a simple swap, but it's not real complicated either. There's just more that has to be done, and nothing is a simple bolt in -- fabrication and welding required!
 

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:( not much easier.....sorry

If you want to do something modern look at the 2.3 Ford turbo motors out of the late 80's Thunderturd Super coupes...Dont know how "easy" they go in but I've seen it done a couple times in Rambler Americans and its a cool drivetrain...I am doing the quad 4 in mine but that can be costly too. What about a 2.3 pinto motor with a sidedraft weber?? I see these all the time and the intakes on fleabay..again, you will have to cut or fab everything to get it in..you could have a driveshaft made to accept the stock rambler rear and what ever trans you use..If your trans is an od unit you should have 4.11 gears ;) I may have a pic of a wagon with the Thunderturd engine..its uglier than sin but its a reference..(hope the owner of that one isnt reading this :boxing: ) I'll post it if I can turn it up..
 

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The 63-64 Classic wagon is around 3300 pounds with an old heavy AMC GEN-1 287 V-8. An 89 T-bird Super Coupe weighs in at 3550 pounds. Performance should be close to the same, at least at low speeds. The T-bird is definitely more aerodynamic than the Rambler! You'd need the same gearing as the T-bird also.

Unfortunately, the engine is the easy part. It will cost about the same to replace the rear suspension no matter what size engine. A bigger engine may present a little more cost due to the need for stronger components, but that's about it (and trivial).

Ladder bars are the cheapest/easiest way to go. Keep the bars at least 30" long and it will ride well on smooth roads, will be a little rougher than stock on rough roads. The longer the bars the better. I would go for a 36" bar myself.
 

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Lucky11wh said:
Hi all,

What would it take to swap a 454 from a mid-70's Chevy truck into my 1963 Rambler Classic 770? I don't have a huge budget and I am not a skilled fabricator by any means - just wondering how much is involved and if it's is feasible (pretty sure it's not totally practical). Thanks.
Check out the second seller on this list. They're offering Tex Smith's book, used but acceptable, for less than 8 bones delivered to your door. Get it. Read it. You don't know what you don't know.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-list...0?ie=UTF8&qid=1246319080&sr=1-5&condition=all

You can swap anything into anything. You just need the knowledge of how to do it and you gain that by reading.

The biggest kink in the BBC swap would be headers. Don't throw away your money trying to build headers to fit the car. Build the car to fit the headers. Any old swap meet headers will work fine, just cut away anything that gets in the way and patch the hole shut.

Four pieces of equipment will get the job done, in addition to regular hand tools of course. A MIG welder, a gas axe, a Sawzall and a 4" hand grinder.
 
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