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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. Since I'm wiring my starter with a remote solenoid I only have the main battery feed connected to it.
Originally there were these 2 red wires terminated as one with an battery post type terminal which also landed on the starter.

Those wires are no longer connected to the starter now.
According to this diagram, is it showing those red wires are connected to constant 12v?

The diagram shows a purple + yellow leading to the starter as the trigger but my car has a tan wire.

I'm so close to finally being done with this 383 stroker swap, just need to figure out this last piece.

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(I guess this could be a 44 year old purple)

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Your El Camino is new enough that it no longer had the yellow wire, which was a 12v+ bypass to the coil in a points distributor set up, to ease starting.
So you can ignore that part of the diagramwith an electronic ignition such as the HEI you have.

The 2 Reds that were also on the starter main post.....those are how the rest of the car and the alternator were connected to the battery main post by the factory.....they just did the connection at the starter main post rather than carry those wires all the way over to the battery terminal.
That 4 wire Red connection bundle is just a "buss bar" junction connection to get all the Red 12v+ feeds together. It is factory also.
So this is correct -
is it showing those red wires are connected to constant 12v?

The Brown or Purple is the trigger wire from the ignition stitch to the starter solenoid for starter cranking. It was purple pre-1975 or so, may have changed to brown after that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You will need to jumper a wire from the starter battery terminal to the "S "terminal to engage the pinion gear with the flywheel ring gear. I never did understand the benefit of using two solenoids.
Yep I have the jumper in place. The only purpose is to keep the wiring to the starter super simple, just the main 12v feed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Your El Camino is new enough that it no longer had the yellow wire, which was a 12v+ bypass to the coil in a points distributor set up, to ease starting.
So you can ignore that part of the diagramwith an electronic ignition such as the HEI you have.

The 2 Reds that were also on the starter main post.....those are how the rest of the car and the alternator were connected to the battery main post by the factory.....they just did the connection at the starter main post rather than carry those wires all the way over to the battery terminal.
That 4 wire Red connection bundle is just a "buss bar" junction connection to get all the Red 12v+ feeds together. It is factory also.
So this is correct -

The Brown or Purple is the trigger wire from the ignition stitch to the starter solenoid for starter cranking. It was purple pre-1975 or so, may have changed to brown after that.
Excellent, thank you for confirming! Every bit of that aligns with what I initially presumed but I really didn't want to chance throwing a 12+ constant where it didn't belong.
I should have this beast buttoned up and running by tomorrow now that I have the spider web of hot wires confirmed.

Thank you again!
 

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Yep I have the jumper in place. The only purpose is to keep the wiring to the starter super simple, just the main 12v feed.
Are you using a Ford type remote starter solenoid?

The way I always wired them is main battery cable to remote solenoid main in post, then from remote solenoid main out post to the original solenoid/starter's main post, with the jumper from main starter post to solenoid engage post.

Original solenoid engage/trigger wire goes to the trigger post of remote solenoid.

Wired this way, nothing is electrically hot on the actual starter until the Ford solenoid is engaged, not even the main starter battery cable. Then there is no way to have a short around the headers/exhaust.
Ford solenoid mounted on the firewall or inner fender panel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Are you using a Ford type remote starter solenoid?

The way I always wired them is main battery cable to remote solenoid main in post, then from remote solenoid main out post to the original solenoid/starter's main post, with the jumper from main starter post to solenoid engage post.

Original solenoid engage/trigger wire goes to the trigger post of remote solenoid.

Wired this way, nothing is electrically hot on the actual starter until the Ford solenoid is engaged, not even the main starter battery cable. Then there is no way to have a short around the headers/exhaust.
Ford solenoid mounted on the firewall or inner fender panel.
Thank you! Yes exactly, that's why I chose this wiring method. I completely understand how to get the starter functional (even though the wiring color for the trigger lead matches nothing I've found unless that wire in the photo is purple, which is completely possible considering the age) it was more so the alternator and the other 12v+ feed heading back to the fuse panel\interior cabin.
 

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...nothing is electrically hot on the actual starter until the Ford solenoid is engaged, not even the main starter battery cable. Then there is no way to have a short around the headers/exhaust.
Ford solenoid mounted on the firewall or inner fender panel.
Well that's something I never even considered. It's certainly a benefit of a remote solenoid. (y) In fact, I may go that route this fall when I install an American Autowire kit in my 69 Chevy pickup.

However, the selling point for remote solenoids has always been that they cure the problem of the starter-mounted solenoid getting heat-soaked. But that has never made sense to me because it still has to do its job of pushing back the pinion gear to engage the flywheel ring gear. Can anyone enlighten me here?
 

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If one just wants to cut power off battery Intellitec battery disconnect does that without having to keep the (Ford) solenoid energized when in use. It has a pulse on/off. It must be an over center type mechanism. I energize/turn off with a small on/off pulse switch. I got mine at PVR parts.com. This type solenoid is used on RV’s. So when I’m cycling the starter it has to power only the one GM starter solenoid.

To answer the heat soak cure, I can’t put any logic to two solenoids in series doing anything to reduce heat/resistance in system. Personally installation requires removal and replacement/cleaning at connections and that activity is what “remedies” the heat soak, not the added solenoid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hmm so I got everything wired up but I didn't connect the battery yet.
That trigger wire has a split second of continuity with the constant 12v+ bundle which I thought was odd.

There must be an automatic resetting circuit breaker because the meter stops the continuity tone after touching the leads, but then 15 seconds or so later it will beep again.
Here's video of me testing the wiring. Continuity between ignition signal and 12v+ constant.

Does this seem normal? My worry is when I connect the battery the starter will attempt to engage without the key in the start position.
 

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I’m no electrical wiz but could that be a residual magnetic field in the coil that blips the meter? Your solenoid looks a lot smaller than my recollection of a Ford unit.
Is there a circuit board or components like a small capacitor associated with your solenoid?
 

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Yeah, I never saw the logic behind adding the Ford solenoid. The era of the Ford solenoid is from when Ford used a centrifugal gear engagement so there was nothing electrical on the starter to control the pinion gear as there is on the GM starters.

The GM starter uses a dual function solenoid on the starter that throws the pinion into the ring gear for cranking the engine while at the same time it engages the contractors for supplying high current to the starter motor.

Nearly all if not all problems with getting the GM solenoid to function when the engine and starter are hot can be traced to a failure of the key switched wire that triggers the solenoid. Replacing this wire with a larger gauge with fresh insulation and terminal ends makes the problem of getting the starter solenoid to “switch” power on the starter motor go away without introducing another electrical failure point.

Strangely I’ve run a lot of headers on various engines over my decades of doing this stuff and the only vehicles I had heat problems with the starter was early to mid 1960 FE engined Fords with the factory Tri-Y cast iron headers. I rather expect this was post shutdown heat soak from the mass of all that iron tightly formed around the starter.


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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I’m no electrical wiz but could that be a residual magnetic field in the coil that blips the meter? Your solenoid looks a lot smaller than my recollection of a Ford unit.
Is there a circuit board or components like a small capacitor associated with your solenoid?
I'm not 100% sure why it was doing that on the multimeter but I confirmed that it was indeed the correct ignition trigger wire, hooked it all up and is starts \ stops as expected.

I really hate opening a ton of threads so I'll ask this here as well.
Do you think this fuel line slightly touching the heater hose is going to become a problem? (Heat soak or just by rubbing in general)

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I would say no concern. My 67 corvette had it’s original steel fuel line touching the intake manifold forever no problem. When I restored it changed it to stainless line and repositioned it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you. Yep I figured it'd be alright, it's barely touching the hose and everything is new. (fresh rubber)
All I have left is to hook up the vacuum lines and this beast is ready to start!
 

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Do you think this fuel line slightly touching the heater hose is going to become a problem? (Heat soak or just by rubbing in general)
You could use a 45 degree fitting on the manifold, then run the hose over the front of the valve cover. And doesn't your pump have a port where you could connect the other hose, instead of where it's mounted? Just doesn't look very clean where it's routed, on an otherwise nice-looking engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yeah I'm not a big fan of the heater hose running like they are but the water pump outlet is only on the top and the intake outlet is currently a straight fitting. (no one sells them locally)
The mechanical fuel pump has only 1 inlet \ 1 outlet and the carb\line is setup as a dual feed.

I suppose I can pause the project and wait 2 days for the 45* intake fitting. (better than having to deal with coolant dumping out later)

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ohh and I think I read your input wrong.
No the water pump appears to have only 1 heater hose port and the lower radiator port. (I looked all over, it doesn't have the typical outlet on the left near the rad port which sucks because that forces me to run it up and over like you see in the pictures)

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Interesting. I've never seen an SBC water pump (even a short one) without an inlet port on the passengers side. But I just found one at Summit Racing. You learn something new everyday. Very clean setup you have there on the front of the engine. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yeah this is a 1st for me as well. Can that front port on the intake be used because that would surely get it out of the way? (I think it's a bypass so I'm not sure that would work or not)
I'm just thinking even with a 45* it still might be a tight fit, maybe I'll go with a 90* and route the line straight back across the intake.

I read another thread where someone mentioned cutting those fuel feed tubes but then I have to find the proper 37* flare, blah blah blah.
 
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