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True Hotrodder
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Ford has issues with cruise control switch fires for at least a decade.
"Since 1999, the Ford Motor Company has recalled over 14 million Ford, Lincoln and Mercury cars, SUVs and pickup trucks due to faulty cruise control switches, which can corrode overtime and catch fire...."
 

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Old(s) Fart
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Ford has issues with cruise control switch fires for at least a decade.
"Since 1999, the Ford Motor Company has recalled over 14 million Ford, Lincoln and Mercury cars, SUVs and pickup trucks due to faulty cruise control switches, which can corrode overtime and catch fire...."
Didn't Ford also recommend not parking those vehicles indoors? I guess we should reconsider buying Ford products also... :ROFLMAO:
 

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Race it, Don't rice it!
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That actually happened to me, well, a buddy cars while he was driving as I was riding along. It burnt the thing to the ground too waiting on the FD to show up.
electric or gas or diesel or propane or whatever.... I don't care, I get really tired of the everyone telling ever one else what they should and shouldn't do or think in the world of politics.
 

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True Hotrodder
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So the Fords and all the others that you claim were simply sitting? Not being used, not running, just sitting?

I have been in several car fires, the last was due to a catalytic that caught fire - it too burned the vehicle to the ground and I have a few scars from that fire to prove it.

Bottomline - -I don't give a damn what you purchase, that's your choice but I will not put my family at risk with an EV.
 

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Old(s) Fart
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So the Fords and all the others that you claim were simply sitting? Not being used, not running, just sitting?
Yes

 

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As far as EV's go - I'm interested in exactly how they are going to generate and distribute all that electricity for everyone to charge their vehicles each night - once they become affordable enough for the general public. Let's do some math.

A Tesla takes 34kwh to go 100 miles.
US drivers travel 3.2 trillion miles each year.
That is 1.088 trillion kwh of electricity needed.

Now lets look at electricity generated in the USA in 2020. You can draw your own conclusions from there. But I think they had better get busy on the renewables if they hope to add another 26% of clean energy to this profile below. At least that would get them down to below 50% of total electricity generated by fossil fuels. Seems pretty silly to make this wonderful "clean energy" by burning fossil fuels. Maybe the solution is a nuclear plant in everyone's back yard or to give up some of those high-dollar vacation properties to build reservoirs for hydroelectric plants. Certainly much cheaper electricity than those ugly fields of windmills in Iowa or huge solar arrays in cloudy North-central Indiana - but someone certainly made some big Federal money building them! ...... but can our current infrastructure distribute another 26% without brownouts everywhere?

...... and then the price of electricity will skyrocket to cover all the additional costs. Rant off!

617630
 

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Old(s) Fart
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As far as EV's go - I'm interested in exactly how they are going to generate and distribute all that electricity for everyone to charge their vehicles each night - once they become affordable enough for the general public.
That is a valid discussion to have and completely unrelated to the OP's point in this thread. Crapping on EVs because they can catch fire is BS. Having a civil discussion on where the electricity comes from and what mass recharging will do to our grid is a very valid point. Unfortunately sensationalizing the discussion with stories about fires and recalls doesn't help to have a mature discussion.
 

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That is a valid discussion to have and completely unrelated to the OP's point in this thread. Crapping on EVs because they can catch fire is BS. Having a civil discussion on where the electricity comes from and what mass recharging will do to our grid is a very valid point. Unfortunately sensationalizing the discussion with stories about fires and recalls doesn't help to have a mature discussion.
I don't mind an electric vehicle. I rented an all-electric Fiat for grins and giggles through Turo in Vegas a couple of years ago. Thing was a stoplight rocket in town, but range was very poor at 45 mph+. Tried to tour Redrocks (a one-way road with no early exits) but chickened out because of the range when we got to the entrance.

My wife is a surgical nurse at a pretty large hospital and says that Teslas have become a status symbol with the surgeons and their wives - they all have them (sporty one for the Dr. and SUV for the wife).

On the other hand, I have heard of danger when a battery gets damaged in a Tesla wreck. I suppose it's all a matter of your chances of getting hurt. If only a small chance, then I'm OK taking it. Life after all is a series of chances to get hurt and die! But obviously the OP does not believe the EV batteries are proven safe enough for him and his family. It's early on in electric car safety...... To each his own.
 

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US power grid is at about 35% capacity at 2AM---charging electric cars at night will make balancing the load on the grid easier---offering lower cost power at off peak times is already happening in industrial settings
 

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I view the OP as reporting the news on Bolt's catching fire. The news is all over the internet today. When I was employed (retired now) I looked into an EV for commute to work. At the time a used EV with diminished battery range was not an option as I would need to plug it in at work for a topping off. Plus the motorcycle was more fun to ride.

We owned one of the Ford F-150 in the recall range of the cruise control electrical problem. WHen I called the dealer , the switches were waaay back ordered and they would call me when the switches came in. I never received a call and after 4 years the truck was traded off. We never parked the truck outside when it was at home
 

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Think about it... it's the batteries that are catching fire, I'm sure.
So any manufacturer's vehicles could be subject to it.
Just another drawback to the magical electric vehicle.

Batteries Made in China...
Short driving range...
How are you going to charge it when there's no power (like in California)...
Spontaneous Combustion...

So it isn't logical at all to think we're going to go "all-electric".
The whole "save the planet" stuff is all BS anyway, since China won't change, Russia will now be selling oil to our European "allies"... so that indicates that they aren't slowing down on oil consumption... China will be making all sorts of money off of the batteries and etc. for the electric vehicles.
So it looks like everyone else will be using and selling oil, while our corrupt politicians screw us over, so that China can take over.
 

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As far as EV's go - I'm interested in exactly how they are going to generate and distribute all that electricity for everyone to charge their vehicles each night - once they become affordable enough for the general public. Let's do some math.
'Necessity is the mother of innovation'

I'm curious as well as to how we can generate the additional electricity required in our current state of US society. But that's not a reason to throw out the baby out with the bath water imo.

===============

Regarding Tesla's as a status symbol at the hospital - I remember when the 'upper' echelon thought it necessary to wear polo shirts with alligators on them with collars pulled up. While the other end of our society at the time was wearing parachute pants.

I'm glad I'm not concerned about status lol - it's kept the fashion police from arresting me. Probably no Tesla for me either until you can find a used for $1500.
 

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It's about the same danger as rupturing your gas tank in an accident. I'll never own an EV or any car with a touch screen on the dash, but I also have a low threshold for BS.
Not really, an EV battery fire is much more of a problem, it is pretty much impossible to stop, as the fire can start again by itself for a couple of days. EV car manufacturers recommend to dunk the whole car in a tank full of water for up to 48 hours as the only real solution to a battery fire!!! How many tow truck companies do you know have such a tank? The batteries burning so long also cause extra damage to the road surface, while endangering the life of the fire-crew. Firemen who are actually seldom trained to deal with those specific fires. Some cities are starting to talk about banning EV parking from underground or indoor parking lots because of this issue...
And that is only one of the numerous issue (economic, environment, electricity production and distribution, convenience...) with EVs. I am really tired of all the BS about EVs being the way of the future. Evs are only good for China and for investors pocketing government subsidies.
 

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China is producing millions of electric vehicles for domestic use---the sale of gasoline powered cars has already been banned in many areas.
 

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The fire issue is common to lithium-ion batteries. They are very sensitive to charge state and charge rate. The car batteries are really nothing more than stacks and stacks of the same type of cell that is used to make cordless tool battery packs. At least , that's the way they were made a few years ago. That may have changed, but I don't really keep up with electric cars.

Lithium-ion packs have to have electronic oversight to limit their discharge and charge. That's why your cordless drill just stops when it gets low. The internal chip shuts it down before it reaches a critical state. Same with charging. Sounds like the GM problem was overcharging since they limited total charge. Discharge them too far, overcharge them or charge them too fast and they can catch on fire. Remember the Samsung phones that were catching on fire a few years ago. The charge rate was too high and had to be lowered. I recently read about fires being caused by lithium-ion cordless tool batteries left on chargers. All it takes is a chip failure and you have a fire risk.

Lithium-ion batteries essentially act like solid rocket fuel when they burn, generating their own oxygen supply. This is what makes them so hard to put out. The fire fighting tech has not caught up with the battery tech. Some fire departments have taken the approach that they will not endanger themselves with an electric car fire. They will attempt to extract you, but if they can't get you out quickly, they will let you burn. This came from someone who's son worked for a fire department in a large city. Take that for what it's worth.

I also read that some European cities had purchased large dumpster type containers and special front end loaders. The tactic is to rush in with the loader, scoop up the electric car and dump it in the container where it can burn itself out.

One of the problems I see is that electric cars are being pushed too quickly. I think most of the issues can be solved, but it will take time. I think much, much longer than the idealists think. I has taken over 100 years to get the internal combustion engine to where it is. This includes not only the engines, but the infrastructure to support them. I don't think even a massive investment in money and tech can solve these infrastructure issues as quickly as some think.

Personally, I think the problems with hydrogen powered cars, both internal combustion and fuel cells, can be solved far easier and quicker than the problems with battery cars. Hydrogen can be extracted from oil until a cheaper method of extracting it from water is developed. This would allow us to transition over more gradually. Put the money that you are dumping into batteries into the hydrogen transportation and storage issue and I believe these problems will be solved in short order while retaining much of the tech that has been developed over the last century.
 

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Most every airplane has lithium batteries now---watch out for falling planes.
GM decided 20 years ago that fuel cell vehicles were the future and so they spent billions on the technology. Then they had to shift to the current EV model.
 
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