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Rebuilt Excitment
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There were several different in-line eight cylinder engine at one time which kind are you looking for? The General even had both flathead and overhead valve versions being produced at the same time.
 

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Evil, I'd pick up an old Chilton's manual and look at some specs before picking one up, especially if you intend to run it a good bit. Some of the old engines didn't have a real rear seal, just a slinger. That was okay for low rpm driving back in the 30s when there may have been a "high" rpm (3K+) dash occasionally, but not for today! I'd also look for something with nine main bearings instead of five. I'm not sure which ones had that many right off, I tink the 50s Buick did. Just about everyone used straight eights up to 1953 or 54. I'd recommend a late 30s Nash (I don't think they restarted I8 production after WWII) or a Buick. Some of the Buford's had dual carbs, something that would be better for the long engine. Direct port injection would be awesome... either adapt a V-8 sequential injection or use a batch fire setup. The first and last cylinders on long inline eninges (even sixes) always run a little lean and hotter with a single carb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hey guys,thanks for the re:.Im not realy picky on an eight,but would prefer a buick or pontiac.Im building an A model,tudoor,and want it to be verry different.Anyone with a lead on one,please drop a line:)
 

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Rebuilt Excitment
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The Pontiac in-line 8 is a flathead, and it is very long. I know cause I have one in the barn, it is the original out of my car. They are also extremely heavy, we used a backhoe to pull the motor and trans out of the frame and had to extend the hoe out to balance the weight. No i will not sell it as it matches the title for my car. If you want to do something different look at some of the odd ball V8's IE rambler, Studebaker,Buick or olds aluminum V8 (215 Cubic inch). With a in-line 8 in a model A you will need to extend the front end about 2 feet or do a severe engine set back and drive from the back seat.
 

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Chopper Builder o<>\o
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171 Posts
It's funny that your looking for a straight 8. I had a complete 1940 Buick Super with a straight 8 motor. I sold the whole thing with rebuilt carb., water pump and generator for $700 to an 18 year old kid earlier this year. It took me many months before someone bought it.

Good luck finding one.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
info

Well EBlack36,I had a 53 Pontiac when I was in high school,with a straight in it.I thought it was the toughest motor around.As for putting a diff. motor in it ,that is out of the question.I plan on extending the frame,I own a custom metal fab/body shop,so its not a matter of if I can do it,only if I can find a motor!Fourbyfourblazer,do you know if the person you sold the car to would like to sell it,or do you have any way I could get a hold of them?Thanks for the RE: guys,Keep it coming.
 

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Chopper Builder o<>\o
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171 Posts
I wish I could help you out. The kid is long gone. I'll keep a look out for a straight 8. I'll check my buick links and see if I can come up with some thing.

here are some links I found. give them a try.

[email protected] or call Charlie (318) 938-5273

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50-53 Buick Straight 8 Motors

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Dutch Auction

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Keep a look out for the Nash as well. They made a L-head, but most (all the later 40s) are OHV and pretty tough and powerful. Crower built a 1931 model some years ago for a Bonneville car. They got 700 hp out of it! The Nash originally ran somewhere around 7:1 compression, but used a forged crank and rods with NINE main bearings. Crank was rather stiff for a I-8! I'm sure Corwer bumped the compression up at least a couple points as well.

" In addition to product testing and development, both of Crower’s Bonneville race cars were completely designed and constructed at the Jamul facility. A 1927 Model-T roadster equipped with a 700hp 1931 straight-8 Nash engine, and a state-of-the-art streamliner powered by a turbocharged small block Chevy and a pair of prototype Crower 4-valve cylinder heads."
(from http://www.crower.com/misc/aboutus.shtml)

I'm sure Crower chose the Nash because of the factory forged parts and those nine mains. Of course most (if not all) factory engines had forged cranks at least through around 1954 because casting technology couldn't produce a durable cast crank until the early 50s.
 

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Rebuilt Excitment
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I figured that you could do it or you would not have asked the question, My only concern is the weight of these monsters as most of it will be on the front end, could make for a very heavy steering ride. Good luck with the project. Easiest way may be to buy a whole car from the early 50's to get the drive-train from and make an adapter to run a late model 5 or six speed. might also consider adding a steel plate over the rear end in order to even the weight of the car out. Just a random thought hope it helps.
 

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Member - AMC/Rambler "guru"
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Take a look at the December issue of Hot Rod. In the Bonneville Salt Flats article there is a pic of a Chrysler flat head straight eight in a 34 Airflow sedan. No good pic of the car, but the engine has a B&M blower with two 4V carbs on it! Says it hit 151 mph in the inline calss over 320 inches. The biggest straight eight Chrysler made appears to be a 323 beginning around 1935. The last Chrysler I-8 was produced in 1950, don't know if it was a flat head or OHV though.
 
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