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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi ,
Now i have this new plan about a donor diesel engine.
My dad owned a farm, and in 1965 he bought a new combined harverster, with a 6 cylinder perkins diesel on it.Most of them were ford diesels,but one of ten had this perkins diesel mounted.We used it maybe 20 years,at the end he liked every day one liter of oil , harvesting under heavy conditions.Once the whole engine was almost on fire, because of sweating oil, heat and dust, but we could save her with some sand
Under these heavy conditions the engine was singing as a bird, and when the combine was swallowing to much straw, she gave smoke signals.
The whole machine is still in the barn, and now i think swapping the diesel engine into the pick up, as a tribute to all the sweat memories on the farm.
Problem is, how the mount the perkins to the gearbox.I really like the idea.Maybe some one has a suggestion
 

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Automotive Extraordinaire
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I will take for granted that the transmission in the truck is still a manual with a removable bell housing? If so, worst case scenario, you could build a bell housing from steel that would mate the two pieces together. All that would leave is matching the splines and size of the input shaft to the flywheel, which should not be too hard if there is a good machine shop in the area. I will see if I can find the article, but several years ago a man in GA put a perkins deisel in a mid-late Chev pickup and tested it at Atlanta speedway. It got something like 70 MPG......but I have not heard anyhting else about it since....Plus you may consider a "google" search on the subject. There just may be someone making an adapter or swap kit.

Kelly
 

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what monster just posted. The industrial bell housing has a lot of interchangeable parts. My neighbour had a GMC pick up with a forklift diesel and a 6 speed.It was fairly cheap on fuel but for accelleration,you timed it with a calendar. Most farm machinery are under 100 horse power,with a lot more closer to 40 horse power.If you plan to just have a fun project,go for it.If you plan to drive it on the road as a daily truck,better do the math to see if its worth bothering with?
 
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