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I go to change oil in the Buick. Drain plug comes out just fine, he haw around till it’s done dripping, then move to the filter. Holy cow is it on tight, the filter cup just slips, strap and chain wrench don’t have enough room to move, filter pliers just punched a hole in the side. I’ve never had one this tight, I tighten by hand, then roughly 1/8 turn with 3/8“ ratchet, me holding the ratchet head, not the handle. Done it this way since I was a teenager, never any real trouble.

So, Autozone has a wrench that looks like a three jaw puller, but the fingers grab the filter sides and dig in harder the harder you turn the ratchet to loosen, well, this and a 3/4” ratchet saved the day. It took some grunt to get it free, then it just spun off freely.

So, what’s your oil filter horror story?
 

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Sometimes you just have to peel them apart. Wait till you see this effect of everything is a strength contest when it’s applied to mounting a Holley carb to where the throttle base plate is bent. OMG!

Bogie
 

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Sixteen and working as a pump jockey. On Sundays, they let me work in the garage on tire change, oil changes, lube jobs that sort of thing. Guy comes in with old Plymouth, one of the ones with the big fins on the back and he wants an oil change. I get it up on the rack and drop the oil, then start taking the filter off - it won't budge. I try every tool I can think of in the tool box - nothing. I get Jerry - he's in his 20's, big guy to come and help. He takes a big screwdriver and drives it though the can, the can rips off from the mounting plate, so had to resort to using a hammer and chisel to get the mounting plate off. Customer sticks his head in the door and ask what's taking so long. We tell him that we had a heck of a time getting the filter off - he says I wanted just the oil changed, I've never changed the filter. He of course got the new filter for free and we looked at the old one after he left - sure enough it had the old triangle MOPAR marking on it.

618184
 

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RedLine Stage 4 ZL1 650rwhp
1971 BB Chevelle
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Who the hell leaves the old oil filter and just puts new oil lin, especially on a Super Bird, :oops: unreal.....
I had one i battled with for quite some time on my old Chevelle and the ole screwdriver trick just ripped it apart as others have mentioned. I prefer the tool that grabs the bottom of the filter with a rachet or the channel looking plyers type wrench but you dont always have room for those
 

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Race it, Don't rice it!
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My dad mentions that was standard practice at his shop….in the early 70’s when he got back from Vietnam. It became standard because of the number of requests for the practice.
Also standard practice was change the air from summer air to winter air in the tire shop side.
 

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My brother had a stubborn one on a slant-6 many years ago, screwdriver ripped the can off. It was a cold winter evening, he finally had to chisel it off with just about zero room to swing a hammer. It took about 3 hours to get it off. Lesson learned, he bought the biggest pair of pump pliers he could find, when he was fixing cars, this was his only filter wrench.
 

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When I was fixing cars, customers came in with the Chevy canister filters. I took some down that were probably not changed in years. The element was completely plugged... a few had 2 or 3 o-ring gaskets stuck to the canister.
 

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True Hotrodder
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Who the hell leaves the old oil filter and just puts new oil lin, especially on a Super Bird, :oops: unreal.....
I had one i battled with for quite some time on my old Chevelle and the ole screwdriver trick just ripped it apart as others have mentioned. I prefer the tool that grabs the bottom of the filter with a rachet or the channel looking plyers type wrench but you dont always have room for those
Added a picture of an old Plymouth for you. Superbirds were new cars when I was 16 years old. I found out then that oil change requests did not normally include a filter unless the customer requested an "oil and filter change". And if you were to look back at owner's manuals on a lot of cars up to the 90's or so, a filter change was usually only recommended every other oil change.
 

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My brother had a stubborn one on a slant-6 many years ago, screwdriver ripped the can off. It was a cold winter evening, he finally had to chisel it off with just about zero room to swing a hammer. It took about 3 hours to get it off. Lesson learned, he bought the biggest pair of pump pliers he could find, when he was fixing cars, this was his only filter wrench.
Yep, I bought a huge pair of them years ago and they are my oil filter wrench. If I can't get it off with them, I'm in trouble.
 

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When I was 15 I remember seeing a brand new Superbird come in on a transport to our local dealer in Nevada, Iowa - a town of around 7,000 at the time. So looks like we are about the same age.

For those of you old timers like us, when I was there Chuck Ostrich owned the dealership in Nevada, Iowa and his son Gary drag raced / had an engine shop. It was a MOPAR town. I remember a guy that bought a Hemi Challenger convertible, talking to him, and drooling over his car.

I remember seeing this one parked at the dealership.
Photo: Gary Ostrich 70 Cuda SSDA @ Indy 1970.jpg | 70's Cuda Super Stocks album | VincePutt

also saw this one at the dealership.

This one was before I moved to the area.
https://cdn.barrett-jackson.com/staging/carlist/items/Fullsize/Cars/97405/97405_Rear_3-4_Web.jpg

Memories!
 

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The Superbirds were designed in Huntsville, AL, where I grew up. Guys a little older than me remember seeing them at a nondescript building that was owned by the local Ford dealer. Chrysler was ending their activities with NASA so they had engineers in town that knew about aero and had nothing to do. One of the test mules is still sitting in a home garage.
 

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My brother worked for Chinook Chrysler in Calgary Alberta. He was a detailer. Drove lots of mopars. Had the bragging rights for driving a 69 orange Daytona across town to the detail shop. Just a 440 727 beast.
We we’re a mopar family. I went with my dad to test drive a 70 hemi cuda once. Coulda bought it for 5200 bucks. Not a good family car. LOL!
Those were the days!
 

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I go to change oil in the Buick. Drain plug comes out just fine, he haw around till it’s done dripping, then move to the filter. Holy cow is it on tight, the filter cup just slips, strap and chain wrench don’t have enough room to move, filter pliers just punched a hole in the side. I’ve never had one this tight, I tighten by hand, then roughly 1/8 turn with 3/8“ ratchet, me holding the ratchet head, not the handle. Done it this way since I was a teenager, never any real trouble.

So, Autozone has a wrench that looks like a three jaw puller, but the fingers grab the filter sides and dig in harder the harder you turn the ratchet to loosen, well, this and a 3/4” ratchet saved the day. It took some grunt to get it free, then it just spun off freely.

So, what’s your oil filter horror story?
Oil Filters are typically the most over-torqued screw-on component on our cars. Many if not most of us have experienced the nightmare of not being able to remove an oil filter without divine intervention. The instructions on the side of most of them are very specific about how much to turn them past contact of the seal and the block that is just enough to avoid leaks. K & N filters suggest a full turn, others suggest 3/4 of a turn. Believing that awful 1" nut-shaped abomination on the bottom of K & N filters will make removal easy, made many of us yell cuss words we didn't know we knew. Those hard rubber seals on top of filters are amazing in that they don't require Clark Kent torquing them to avoid leaking.
 

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Sixteen and working as a pump jockey. On Sundays, they let me work in the garage on tire change, oil changes, lube jobs that sort of thing. Guy comes in with old Plymouth, one of the ones with the big fins on the back and he wants an oil change. I get it up on the rack and drop the oil, then start taking the filter off - it won't budge. I try every tool I can think of in the tool box - nothing. I get Jerry - he's in his 20's, big guy to come and help. He takes a big screwdriver and drives it though the can, the can rips off from the mounting plate, so had to resort to using a hammer and chisel to get the mounting plate off. Customer sticks his head in the door and ask what's taking so long. We tell him that we had a heck of a time getting the filter off - he says I wanted just the oil changed, I've never changed the filter. He of course got the new filter for free and we looked at the old one after he left - sure enough it had the old triangle MOPAR marking on it.

View attachment 618184
That is poor practice not changing the oil filter. As everyone knows the filter becomes plugged it goes into bypass mode so now unfiltered oil is circulating. It reminds me of J.C. Whitney catalog (long ago) where they had a "do it yourself" oil filter whereby you inserted a roll of toilet paper into the oil canister. Never tried it
 
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