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jsc65: Welcome to Hotrodders. You posted your new question to a 18 yr olde thread.

I have started a new thread here for some answers to your question.

Year, size , brand of the engine may be of interest to the members here.
 

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Yeah a deeper description of what you’re doing?

When one talks chain alignment we rather think of cam to crank timing by way of a timing set that usually consisted of a crank and cam gear connected by a chain. An inaccuracy here has the crankshaft and thus piston positions out quite synchronized with the camshaft’s operation of the valve timing. This leads to poor operation, a loss of power and potentially collisions between pistons and valves though this latter collision problem would vary by specific engine designs, some will some won’t.

Ignition timing is different. Most engine designs use the camshaft as a jackshaft that simply supplies rotational power to the distributor. The distributor is timed back to the crankshaft this is independent of how the camshaft is timed to the crankshaft. So a couple for instances:
  • Even if the cam’s timing set is off a tooth or 10 degrees to the crankshaft a distributor ignition can be adjusted so it is timed correctly with the crankshaft.
  • Even though the camshaft through the timing set is correctly timed to the crankshaft, the distributor can be installed with its gear engagement with the cam off a tooth, we can call that 10 degrees buy generally a tooth is greater than 10 degrees of crank rotation.
  • Keep in mind that the cam and ignition while being referenced in crank degrees turn at half the displacement in degrees of rotation of the crankshaft so the cam and ignition/distributor turn only 1 degree for every 2 of the crankshaft.

Bogie
 
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