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Discussion Starter #1
I have a recently purchased '58 Chevy Stepside that I am currently taking down to bare metal to insure that all rust is discovered and dealt with
before holes begin to develope. My problem is I'm not sure how to deal with the interior roof area. These trucks have a "double-wall" of sheet metal to where you can barely fit your hands and fingers through. When I put my fingers as far in there as possible and run it all the way around I can definately FEEL surface rust in there.

It seem too tight an area to sandblast to where I'd be able to clean out ALL of the sand, while others have suggested POR-15 since the area isn't really seen to begin with.

I just want to make sure that as of right now I have no rust holes in my roof - would like to keep it that way.

Suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Primerbaby, That suggestion is partially correct. Let me exsplain.

POR-15 itself is just a moisture hardened polyurethane coating. It does nothing chemically to the rust itself, it only covers it. Since POR-15 is moisture hardened, moisture will not pass through this coating to the steel below. Since rust needs both air nd moisture to form, coating the rust with POR-15 will just stop the rust from continuing to get worse, it won't kill it. POR-15 is a great product, I use it liberally as well as many of their other products.

Now, your two options would be to blow out all of the scale and with a small wire brush brush the rest of the scale out or as much as possible and use POR-15 metal prep. This will stop the rust and put a zinc coating atop it. Then you can use the POR-15 or the less exspensive version. Doing this will still not be 100% fool proof because you can't get at everything to fully coat and seal the metal with the coating.

The other option is to remove the roofs second layer and covert the rust with a rust converter and spray a weld through primer over the surfaces and re-attach.

HK

[ March 10, 2003: Message edited by: Halloweenking ]</p>
 

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Discussion Starter #3
THANKS HALLOWEEN KING.

I was considering taking a cutting wheel to the initial layer of sheet metal, just two inches in, so I could have better access to the second layer which is actually the most important since it's the opposite side of the outter roof. Then simply tack welding the piece cut-off, etc. etc.

I just wasn't sure if that was too drastic a move and thought maybe someone else out there might have gotten away with some other method.

Either way, I'm learning that this bodywork stuff is some truly hard work and I'd prefer to do it right the first time rather than half-a** it now only to have to start all over again a few years from now.

I figured this much since I had decided that she'd be a keeper. Sometime this year I'd like to take an autobody and welding course that maybe when I retire 35 years from now I could cut out the roof myself and weld in a new one. Till then with my limited experience and funds, this type of resto will have to wait.

The silver POR-15 I'm told will do for now.
 

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Primerbaby, happy to help.

Look n the knowledge base exsterior articles, you can pick up alot of things for the How-to's. If you'd like to learn more feel free to ask, I'm happy to help. Your definatly correct about the hard work, but since I'm the only one that can accomplish what I think up I have to do it :D

The grey POR-15 is overkill for that surface. The grey is a slighly more dense version of the original black. This should only be used for a pitted part that need a higher build coating. Use the black. POR-15 does make a silver topcoating to put on top of the actual POR-15 (POR-15 is UV sensative) thats not UV sensetive, but its only a topcot, not a base.

HK
 

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Discussion Starter #5
HK,

Is it ok to use POR on the exterior areas of my roof, and still be able to shoot the PPG DP90 primer over that without any issues arising?

NOTE: I do not plan on painting my truck and will be running it with just the black epoxy primer.
 

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Absolutly. POR-15 can stand up to any urethane or any other coating. I'd use their tie coat primer over the POR-15 then the PPG epoxy. Scuffing POR-15 is to much work. The tie coat primer will bond with the POR-15 without scuffing. Tie coat primer is also very easy to scuff and work with

HK
 

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Discussion Starter #8
HK,

Urethane BC/CC w/ flattening agent in the clear.

When I go to my local PPG dealer do I just ask for the above?

How many coats will I need to shoot?

What's BC/CC stand for?

Will it be any harder to shoot this than the epoxy primer beneath it?

Joe
Primerbaby
 

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Joe, ask your dealer for a acrylic urethane black, the clear, hardner, reducer and flattening agent. The flattening agent is a additive like hardner. Also if you use the Tie Coat primer over the POR-15 you won't need the epoxy primer.

Responded to the rest in the other post.

HK
 

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That roughness you are feeling is minor surface rust on the unpainted metal, and there is a good chance it has been there since the truck was built. Unprotected steel will rust when exposed to moisture, but after the initial light coating of rust, it will stop unless it is subjected numerous times to extreme conditions like constant exposure to water or salt or other ice melters like calcium chloride, etc.

I doubt that the rust you are feeling will need to be neutralized. It has most likely been there for 40 years, and has not progressed any further because it has not been continuously subjected to the elements.

If it were mine, and the upholstery is out of the truck, I would take a pump up type garden sprayer, put a quart of motor oil in it, and a little enamel reducer, then spray it into the roof through the holes. It will run off, and drip, but will arrest any rust for a long time. The truck will also smell like paint thinner for several days but it will dissipate quickly. I have done this before and it works very well.

Benji
 

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I partially agree with Benji. The surface rust you are feeling will not go any further unless it is constantly subject to moisture. Unless the drip rails leak, there is no way for moisture to get to that point of the cab. I did not do anythting to my 57 in that area, and have had no problems 10 years later.

I would not spray the oil, cause if there is anything in primer it will soak up any oil overspray. I guess it is just my opinion that oil and body work dont go together. Maybe after it is all painted you could do the oil thing.

Chris
 
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