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Some Folks Don't Have Vision!
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Hi, Guys! I'm probably thinking and reading too much, but here goes... I've got a 52 Flathead motor (which I haven't taken apart yet), you know, the one with the ugly draft tube up in front. I've got a -thru 48 vintage Edelbrock 3X2 manifold I'd like to use (obviously, sans draft tube opening). I'll probably go with an electric fuel pump when I put her back together, so I'll be blocking off the fuel pump rod hole anyway. Per Flathead Jack via his catalog, it's cool to dump the draft tube as long as you use a breather where the fuel pump used to be. Does anyone use this setup? I'm thinking I could use the earlier Edelbrock with a breather in the old fuel pump hole as suggested by Jack, but does anyone see any problems with this theory? Thanx!
 

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Should work fine as long as oil baffling has been addressed. If you do a search on this site you will find that the consensus is you really should run a PCV valve rather than a draft tube. Need a fresh air inlet (usually a vented oil filler cap) and a PCV suck point (your fuel pump location) for proper function. Superior to draft tube in every way; keeps engine exterior clean, prevents one source of oil drips on your slab, recovers burnable combustion blow-by (slightly better fuel efficiency), keeps your oil cleaner longer.
 

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Instagram: partsretriever
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Should work fine as long as oil baffling has been addressed. If you do a search on this site you will find that the consensus is you really should run a PCV valve rather than a draft tube. Need a fresh air inlet (usually a vented oil filler cap) and a PCV suck point (your fuel pump location) for proper function. Superior to draft tube in every way; keeps engine exterior clean, prevents one source of oil drips on your slab, recovers burnable combustion blow-by (slightly better fuel efficiency), keeps your oil cleaner longer.
haha now I know what a draft tube is! I always wondered why oil vapor was coming out of some "random tube" on old farm tractrs. :thumbup:
 

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Not very often I find an opportunity to disagree with Willys 36 so I can't pass up the opportunity to point out that the early Chevy V-8s did have provisions for an oil filter, though it was an accessory item and it was sort of Rube Goldberg. A bracket that held a canister was bolted to holes in the block and external plumbing routed the oil thru the canister with filter installed inside. Sort of like the radio and heaters were accessory items in those days but the cutouts/holes and wiring were there . This was true in the Flat head Fords and the in line 6s of Chevy vintage. It took a couple of years to start casting and machining the blocks for the screw in canister types. My 63 327 had the first generation of a canister mounted to the block that received a replacement cartridge and there was no external plumbing. It now has an adapter that accepts the screw on cartridge.
 

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See why I won't ever use a SBC? Hemis came w/ full flow filters from day 1, 1951. And hardened valve seat inserts, and forged cranks and rods, and hi-nickle castings and, . . . . .
 

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Gosh, Willys, the reason I use SBCs is because every 61 and up MOPAR I find when I roam the country side either have no engine or have a SBC stuck in the hole. What is an old guy to do? Oh, I know: just bring a fist full of C notes for bragging rites!!!

Trees
 
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