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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 66 chevelle I am in the process of turning into a prostreeter and I wan't to look into removing the vent window. I am looking into using a lexan window attached with 1/4 turns. I am trying to find information on were to get lexan, how I can shape the curvature in, and how to mount it. I am running into problems like how to mount it without problems opening and closing the doors. any help is more then welcome.

thanks
 

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Try a local plastics supplier for plain sheeting.

Harwood Industries makes Lexan windows for some vehicles, but their site doesn't list anything for pre-'68 Chevelles. Might see if they offer them as a special-order item. If not, maybe they'd tell you what you need as far as curvature, thickness, etc.

www.eharwood.com
 

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While eliminating the vent wing does LOOK cool, it is a pain in the *** not to be able to roll down the side window without the wind blowing you sunglasses off. Vent wings are sorely missed on vehicles by this writer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for giving me something to think about. I still want to do it I might just find a better way. If I could get windows matching the shape I need I could fab were the vent window went to match the main window slot so I can make it retractable
 

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I'm going through the same thing with my pickup. I have a 48 Chevy p/u that has doors from a 51. I want it to look like a 48 so I have to remove the vents. Getting the mechanism out wasn't a big deal, getting glass might prove different.

Barry
 

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And where would you put your hand when you were going around corners???

If you want to elininate the vent window, you can try removing the vent window assembly, but retain the rubber weatherstripping. If you deside to make the whole window fill the opening then you will have to move the window channel to the front of the door and weld it in place. Be sure to re-inforce the channel at the bottom so that it doesn't wiggle front the weight of the glass flexing. Make the first template out of 1/8" tempered masonite and cut it a little larger than needed and use a disc grinder to fit it close and then file fit or use 80 grit paper to final finish. If your going to go with LEXAN, use small ribs made from plywood, glued and brad nailed to the masonite on the inside of the curve to complete the shape. Lay your Lexan over the masonite allowing 1/8 of an inch overlap on all sides. Put 1/4" carriage bolts with large washers in the bottom and bend the Lexan over your 'buck' and use large paper clamps (with taped edges, so as not to mar the Lexan) along the top and sides. Pre-heat your oven to about 350 degrees and pop it in, taking care as not to touch the hot metal surfaces inside. Heat it up for 10 to 15 minutes, turn off oven, open door and let cool for 1/2 hour. Remove from oven, CAREFULLY remove clamps and allow Lexan to relax until it is at room temperature. Remove bolts from buck and see if it retains its desired shape. Trial and error on the time, but don't go over 350. Keep the rack of the oven in the middle.

Trial fit your window and cut it down using the disc sander with 80 - 100 grit. When you get it right, use a 3M pad with a wood blocking to buff the edge of the window to eliminate sanding marks. Finish with a good automotive wax. Bolt new Lexan window up to lower track after guiding it down in to window channel. If this is a sedan, just roll the window up and check the fit, easy! If a hardtop (frameless window), only roll up 90%, close door and then roll up rest of the way and check fit. If okay, repeat on other windows as necessary. You can't use Lexan in the windshield!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
alittle1 said:
And where would you put your hand when you were going around corners???

If you want to elininate the vent window, you can try removing the vent window assembly, but retain the rubber weatherstripping. If you deside to make the whole window fill the opening then you will have to move the window channel to the front of the door and weld it in place. Be sure to re-inforce the channel at the bottom so that it doesn't wiggle front the weight of the glass flexing. Make the first template out of 1/8" tempered masonite and cut it a little larger than needed and use a disc grinder to fit it close and then file fit or use 80 grit paper to final finish. If your going to go with LEXAN, use small ribs made from plywood, glued and brad nailed to the masonite on the inside of the curve to complete the shape. Lay your Lexan over the masonite allowing 1/8 of an inch overlap on all sides. Put 1/4" carriage bolts with large washers in the bottom and bend the Lexan over your 'buck' and use large paper clamps (with taped edges, so as not to mar the Lexan) along the top and sides. Pre-heat your oven to about 350 degrees and pop it in, taking care as not to touch the hot metal surfaces inside. Heat it up for 10 to 15 minutes, turn off oven, open door and let cool for 1/2 hour. Remove from oven, CAREFULLY remove clamps and allow Lexan to relax until it is at room temperature. Remove bolts from buck and see if it retains its desired shape. Trial and error on the time, but don't go over 350. Keep the rack of the oven in the middle.

Trial fit your window and cut it down using the disc sander with 80 - 100 grit. When you get it right, use a 3M pad with a wood blocking to buff the edge of the window to eliminate sanding marks. Finish with a good automotive wax. Bolt new Lexan window up to lower track after guiding it down in to window channel. If this is a sedan, just roll the window up and check the fit, easy! If a hardtop (frameless window), only roll up 90%, close door and then roll up rest of the way and check fit. If okay, repeat on other windows as necessary. You can't use Lexan in the windshield!
this is a frameless window do I need to fabricate an upper slot to hold the window secure? Will the window raising and retracting mechanism evenly lift the new window now that it has material (filled section from vent window) hanging of the track? Thanks for the help guys I know its a lot of work but I have never seen a 66 chevelle without its vent window so I am looking forward to do something different. I should be able to do this with no modification to the track correct? Alittle1 do you have any articles on lexan molding maybe some with pictures? Thanks again for the help
 
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