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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, my name is Bob and I'm new to the Forum. Several months ago, I was lucky enough to acquire a very unique 1953 Chevy 3100 5-window pickup truck. I say very unique, because its former owner (now deceased) had completed about 70% of its refurbishment as a hot rod pickup truck, with a definite flavor of old school hot rodding. The trucks history (as indicated by photos and stories passed down by his spouse) was that the truck was used back in the day as a pusher truck on the Bonneville salt flats. The truck is perfectly restored with no hint of rust, even the frame has been powder coated. Which leads me to the story and situation involving the engine.

After considerable internet research, thank you Mr. Googles, I have determined that the inline 6 261 cubic inch engine came from either a 1959 Chevy school bus or commercial truck. It has a reputation as a well oiled engine that eliminated the babbitt bearing of the former 1953 216 cu/in engine and was a workhorse of an engine. The former owner not only had the engine rebuilt with new over bored pistons, he outfitted it with a McCulloch supercharger that came from a 1959 Studebaker Golden Hawk, along with a Vertex magneto and a set of ceramic headers. The engine is magnificent and I can't wait to turn it over for the first time.

However, the engine hasn't run in nearly a decade (since the former owners passing and my buddy who originally bought it for a retirement project, but never touched it in five years - except to occasionally shoot a shot of WD-40 into each cylinder and hand turn the crank). In my engine preparations, I have rebuilt the entire fuel system, including removal of the gas tank from behind the bench seat in the cab. When I got to the pressurized carb plenum, I had the Stromberg WW carb rebuilt and now I'm stuck on the refurbishment or replacement of the fuel pressure regulator/fuel filter - see photos below.

Fluid Liquid Drinkware Serveware Nickel
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Nickel Gas Bicycle part Plumbing fixture Auto part


At a minimum, I'd like to replace the dry rubber gaskets that seal the chambers of this regulator/filter with something impervious to ethanol (nitrile rubber) however the lower gasket includes the pressure regulated diaphragm that can't be easily replicated. More optimistically, I'd like to replace the entire component with a new or newly refurbished setup. The issue is, there is no discernible manufacturer or part number on this unit, and despite my research I've been unable to determine who made it and/or where I might be able to find a suitable replacement. I'm hopeful that some of the older hotrodders on this site might 1) recognize it, 2) know who made it, 3) know where I might find one (NOS would be amazing), or 4) have one in their parts bin that they are willing to part with for the right deal. Any assistance will be greatly appreciated.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
this might do the fuel pressure function, you would need to add a filter in front of this device.
Can you offer some further education/information. This supercharger/boost/fuel pressure regulator stuff is all new to me. What I know is this - I have an incoming fuel line, an out-going fuel line to the carb in the pressurized plenum, an outgoing fitting to a fuel pressure gauge in the cab, and a vacuum/boost line tied to both the plenum and intake manifold (tee fitting) that is also connected to a boost pressure gauge in the cab.

Here is the photo of the product you suggested with a couple of additional notes from me.

Art Font Painting Drawing Illustration


Notes - 1) The 1/8 NPT port noted in the installation instructions indicate that this is where I would plumb my fuel pressure gauge
2) The Vac/Boost Ref port is circled by me, the instructions say this "The Vacuum / Boost reference port is provided for fuel pressure compensation at a 1:1 rate, this is primarily used in blow-thru centrifugal supercharged applications. In most cases this port is left open to reference atmospheric pressure."

Does Note # 2 mean that if I manually set the fuel pressure to 5 PSI for normal operation, but as acceleration occurs and boost pressure builds, that this device will automatically increase the fuel pressure to compensate for the increased boost pressure, which I assume is increasing the pressure in the pressurized plenum. Without this increase in pressure of the fuel, its possible that the fuel would flow backwards through the return line instead of feed the carb. Is all of this assumption on my part correct?
 

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I believe you are correct.
I would use an isolator for the fuel pressure so you don't have pressurized fuel in the passenger compartment.
It sounds like a really cool old truck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So what happened!
Didn’t you get enough info on the truck forum?
Asked if anyone on the Chevy truck forum knew what the originally posted photo of the fuel regulator was and didn't really get any new info. I thought that a hot rodder forum may have some folks who knew a thing or two about the older supercharger setup.


I believe you are correct.
I would use an isolator for the fuel pressure so you don't have pressurized fuel in the passenger compartment.
It sounds like a really cool old truck.
Funny you should suggest that. I had a friend over on Sunday and after looking over the truck for the the first time, his first comment was to strongly suggest that I ditch the fuel pressure gauge that had a 1/4 inch fuel line running to it in the cab. After thinking about it for a minute, I agreed and ordered an AutoMeter gauge with electric sender unit on Monday.
 
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