Hot Rod Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm pretty much done cutting out the rust in my car. What do you guys know about weld-through primer? Should I use it on my floorboards? I know I'm going to have to overlap some spots because I'm not the greatest welder in the world, and I'm afraid of messing up if I do butt welds. Also, all I have access to is a wire feed welder. Will that do the job? Thank you very much! So far, owning the Rambler has been one of my greatest experiences. I got it running and took it for a short ride. It's got tranny problems, it rattles, squeaks, and makes strange sounds, and I can smell gas when I drive it, but I love the thing to death. Now I know why you people do what you do. Thanks again!
-Levi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
904 Posts
First find the gas leak!!Check were your fuel line runs under floor etc. The weld trough primer will make you sick!, use a fan to blow fumes away from your face!

[ November 23, 2002: Message edited by: roys63 ]</p>
 

·
Just one of the guys
Joined
·
3,074 Posts
Spook,
Like '63 said...FIND THE GAS LEAK. One spark..BOOM. Best bet if you are welding the floor and have a gas leak is to take the time, drop the tank, and get it outside away from where you are welding. Have the tank boiled out and checked while you are at it. Check for brake lines etc, when you start welding. Check all your fits first. With my new pans they had to overlap in areas (the way they were designed) and what I did was pop rivet them in areas to hold them down first. Just a few here and there. Check all your fits after welding to make sure you are satisfied. If you are then start tacking the floor in. Don't start welding in a straight line or you will be asking for some serious warpage. Take your time. It is no half hour job to do it. I worked for better than two days welding most of my pans in. One thing about the floor is that it's the best area to practice the welding. It gets covered with deadener and carpet so it don't have to be pretty.

Kevin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,441 Posts
Depending on the way it is designed, I would try to have a 1/4 inch overlap. It will make the welding much easier. A sheet metal butt weld has to be fit PERFECTLY. If there is any gap it is a beeeotch. The wire feed will work. If it is MIG it will be much better and you will have less trouble burning through.

Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
The tank is dropped and all the gas lines removed. That was the first problem w/ the car. Sediment went through the lines and killed the fuel pump, so I restored the tank and we used a temporary one to get the car to the shop. What is the difference between a MIG and a regular wire feed?
-Levi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
3M weld through primer is awesome stuff. You only want to use use it on bare clean steel.The name is kinda misleading: you aren't really supposed to weld thru it, rather it protects the areas around the welds from corrosion. A reg primer would just burn away leaving oxidized metal which rusts faster than a SOB.If you are using spot welds clean the weld-thru out of the holes with a dull bit.If you are stiching it ,scrape some away along the seam. I used to weld through it, but my I-CAR classes taught me not to, it just contaminates the welds.Who knew?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
The Term MIG is Metal Inert Gas. MIG is what most everyone calls it. GMAW is Gas Metal Arc Welding which is the true name. It is a wire feed welder that uses an inert gas to shield the weld. Most bodyshops use .023 wire with a 75% Argon 25% Co2 mix. Some people use the straight Co2 because it's cheaper, but it welds hotter thus creating more chance for warpage and the welds don't look as clean.
The 3M Weld thru primer is a good idea to use but it should be applied where the two panels mate (the mating sufaces)and to the back of the inclosed panel. There is no reason to put it on the outside where you will have to grind welds or do body repairs. :D
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top