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I need to weld in new metal to my rear quarter panels and have never done such a thing - I've welded lots of exhaust but never body metal. My biggest concern is getting it straight and flush with the existing good metal - Does anyone have any tips for doing this? How do you do it? Are there different methods?
 

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There's lots of different methods, and two that I employ are either using buttwelding clamps to hold the metal in place or tacking a stud to the patch. With the welding clamps you have to have access from behind to assemble them to the panel. Most of the time I just use my stud welder and weld a stud to patch either in the middle if it's a smaller patch, or for larger patches, wherever you need to have the stud to hold it. Then you can hold on to the stud to get it in place.

I make sure the entire patch fits nicely in the opening first. Then I put it in and tack one corner in. This corner will be however flush you want it. Then you tack in the rest of your corners and finally the rest of the weld. Because you have the studs attached, you can pull a corner out if it needs to come out before you tack it. It really isn't too difficult at all to get it as flush as you want it. Keep in mind you need some space for filler over your weld too so you don't have a bulge. You will need to jump your tacks around and let them cool naturally so you have minimal shrinkage distortion of the metal.

A lot of people do overlap or flange welds; I've never done one. All my repairs are made with buttwelds, and I think they would be much easier to do than an overlap weld.

If you don't have a stud welder you can tack some nails to the panel. You just cut the nail or stud off when done and grind it down there if need be. You may have to put some glaze over that area.
 

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CQNRQY
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1990fordLTD said:
I need to weld in new metal to my rear quarter panels and have never done such a thing - I've welded lots of exhaust but never body metal. My biggest concern is getting it straight and flush with the existing good metal - Does anyone have any tips for doing this? How do you do it? Are there different methods?

Welding is one way .....
Check into Clueing them on.....
Today body shops glue panels into place....
A great way to prevent warping and burning up things....
Welding a panel into place takes a lot of practice...Glueing might be something to try.... :thumbup:
:thumbup:
Ive been glueing sills and all kinds of stuff especially good with these thin panels today. Also eliminates pin holes that blisted after you finish painting.
Great for rusty panels that blow thru when you try welding.... :thumbup:
 

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You don't mention the welding method you would use. there is a Brit named David Gardiner who has a gas weld technique that uses minimal filler. I've been practicing it and I like it a lot. I don't know if there are any videos on Youtube, I couldn't find one. I know David is on some of the metal working forums and also sells a DVD, which is pretty good. If you do some searching on the internet, you should be able to find it.
 

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hp246 said:
You don't mention the welding method you would use. there is a Brit named David Gardiner who has a gas weld technique that uses minimal filler. I've been practicing it and I like it a lot. I don't know if there are any videos on Youtube, I couldn't find one. I know David is on some of the metal working forums and also sells a DVD, which is pretty good. If you do some searching on the internet, you should be able to find it.
Search hammer welding on you tube, there's a mess of them.
 

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One thing that needs to be mentioned is that it takes practice to get good at welding in patch panels so one learns how to do it without warping the weld area..Main thing is learning how to stretch and shrink so you can fix your errors..

Sam
 

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CQNRQY
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CQNRQY said:
Welding is one way .....
Check into Glueing them on.....
Today body shops glue panels into place....
A great way to prevent warping and burning up things....
Welding a panel into place takes a Lot of practice...Glueing might be something to try.... :thumbup:
:thumbup:
Ive been glueing sills and all kinds of stuff, especially good with these thin panels today. Also eliminates pin holes that blisted after you finish painting.
Great for rusty panels that blow thru when you try welding.... :thumbup:
If I was going to weld it . I spot weld it into place and then mig weld the panel...staggard my welds and cool them as I went along to prevent warping. But honestly any large piece would get glued into place. No warpage,No heat into the metal (the areas that are welded heated Always Rust first) :thumbup:
 

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Panel adhesive is fine for the low areas, but I wouldn't use it on the upper parts of the car, where it will get lots of heat from the sun because the outline will show.

I like to use magnets to hold a patch panel, although you can't weld close to the magnets with a mig or tig. You really need a way to hold the patch on to be sure its a perfect fit, if you want to do good work.
 
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