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· put up or shut up
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reading up on tutorials is the best start then lots of practice. You must get used to the right sound, right wire speed, and right voltage. You can have the right sound and not have everything else right. My rule is the right sound as high as I can go without burning thru. Sheet metal is always quick zaps and after some experience you will find yourself wanting good light to aim at the places with most metal. Like if you lay your initial tacks. You then want to go back to an earlier tack and lay another one overlapping that one. It will not only help you with dissipating heat, it will also leave you with cleaner welds through out and not just a scattered mess. So experience helps you with finding right setting per situation, learning metal characteristics, learning your welder, and getting your style of welding down. Some guys like to weld with one hand and don't care for light. I like a bright light, one hand as a stabilizer, and the other on the trigger, a fresh cut wire, and I just have a bunch of things I do that can only be taught with experience. So reading will give you a good general idea but practicing on old fenders will help lots. Practice on 18 gauge if you plan on doing an old car. It helps to just cut squares out and re weld them in somewhere else, then practice fabricating a patch for the hole you just cut. This practice will help you when you need to make patches. it helps. After a while you will make any patch you want and never have to re cut it but just shave off a little here and there.
 

· put up or shut up
Joined
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6,231 Posts
I agree. probably has a stuttering sound to, right? When you turn the wire speed up up you'll hear the frying bacon sound you want to achieve, but remember, you can achieve that sound every time you turn up your amps as long as you turn up your wire speed too, so it doesn't necessarily mean you are where you want to be, just means it's a good setting for some metal thickness, but maybe not yours. The key is to find the highest you can go with that sound
where it won't burn thru with quick tacks.

To make life easier I have a couple settings I have jotted down...

open butt weld setting

bigger gap open butt weld setting

plug weld setting

3 layer plug weld setting

My plug weld setting is my settings I use to also weld a seam where it's flanged under it or welding the edge of a lapped panel. My bigger gap open butt weld settings is also the settings I use to tack close pinholes where it doesn't call for a patch, if it burns away then I determine the metal is weak and need a patch. My 3 layer plug weld settings is also my settings for welding 16 gauge lapped for brackets and what not, or a plug weld with 16 gauge.

All these settings are simply a starting point. A lot depends on how straight the line is. If it's not so straight I'll probably have to turn up the wire speed a tad, but I don't sit there and test metal. I already know the welder. I'll sacrifice a tack or two and adjust by sound and what the wire is telling me. If the wire is doing what's happening to yours I need more wire speed. If it's pushing the work away and leaving big wire ends it's too fast. My goal is the flattest puddle I can make with the right sound. This means I must do fast tacks or it will burn thru. Sometimes a slightly slow wire speed will get you the best welds but are inconsistent. The sizzle will give good welds no matter how you move the line around while moving to different welding spots. some welders are also quarky. Some don't work the same every time, mainly old ones. Having a new miller will leave you awesome welds every time.
 
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