Hot Rod Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Race it, Don't rice it!
Joined
·
8,813 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did some welding over the christmas weekend. Flux welding mild steel at that. The gargae I was working in was small but we had the door open. Air was kinda still. Yesterday and today I feel very fatiged and scatterbrained. Can't quite get my head on straight kinda feeling. Sorta like when you first wake up. except it last's all day. Seems like the last time I was welding for him the same thing happened. I've heard of long term exposure health realted problems, nothing short term though. Could it be? Ever get this way from welding Flux fumes in a small shop?
 

·
Hotrodders.com moderator
Joined
·
9,581 Posts
That can do it...what the deal is is that one who is exposed to long term occupational exposure to welding fumes can get the "welders disease"..

See one is breathing vaporized heavy metals and the effect is cumulative over time..

What this means to us as hotrodders is that if we just tack weld on occasional basis one may not have a problem..but the guys who work in shops or do a lot of welding are subject to getting "welders disease"...

Probably it is time for you to consider a supplied air system..PM me and I will see if I cna come up with one for reasonable..

Sam
 

·
Race it, Don't rice it!
Joined
·
8,813 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nothing gavinized, just plain mild steel, I did about 10 two inch long beads on 2"x.135 walled square tubing. Typical setup, typical hood, .035 flux wire, A little Nothing special. Seems weird I should feel bad afterword though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
That does seem a little weird.Thats less than 2 ft of weld .All day with no ventilation maybe but that little bit of welding is strange unless your allergic to mig flux .Like the other post said gal.is poison but common steel is weird
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
welding illness

a buddy if mine ended up spending a few days in the hospital from breathing welding fumes. He was chopping the top on his 39 chev delivery,and was inside the car welding the inner structure.this was quite a few years ago,and I dont think there were any long term problems from it.
 

·
Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
Joined
·
16,459 Posts
This thread is a MUST READ http://www.chevelles.com/forums/showthread.php?t=10397

DON'T MESS AROUND, get yourself a resporator!!! Use a fan to blow out that smoke. That smoke is full of METAL, it is VERY hazardous!

Tak care of yourself, you only get one body.

Brian

PLEASE read the link and listen up, Eric has paid in spades for that education!
 

·
Lost in the 50s!
Joined
·
758 Posts
I can't speak for anyone else, but I never had a problem from welding. I started with a arc welder at age 9 (No kidding!) and grew up in a steel fabrication shop. My dad still works in one after 35 or so years. He has never mentioned those type of problems.

Most of what I did after I was a teenager was MiG. (hot roll, stainless, aluminum, hastelloy, inconel).

The only problem I ever had was welding galvanized without a respirator once. Never did that again!

If you are that sensitive to it (a few feet of weld), you should avoid it at all costs.

Now automotive painting..whole different ballgame for me. I need one of those supplied air setups. :D
 

·
Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
Joined
·
16,459 Posts
Brian_B said:
I can't speak for anyone else, but I never had a problem from welding. I started with a arc welder at age 9 (No kidding!) and grew up in a steel fabrication shop. My dad still works in one after 35 or so years. He has never mentioned those type of problems.

Most of what I did after I was a teenager was MiG. (hot roll, stainless, aluminum, hastelloy, inconel).

The only problem I ever had was welding galvanized without a respirator once. Never did that again!

If you are that sensitive to it (a few feet of weld), you should avoid it at all costs.

Now automotive painting..whole different ballgame for me. I need one of those supplied air setups. :D
Brian, the problem is, you probably do have some health issues because of the exposure. Your sensitivity to paint "may" be one of the symptoms.

It is like a guy who says he has smoked for years and doesn't have a problem. Well, yes he does, he just doesn't know it yet.

Start wearing that fresh air system while welding, it isn't too late to start.

Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Sensitivity to fumes

I am 60 now & found that, as I aged, I became more & more sensitive to fumes of any kind. At this point in time, for example, I can't handle a non-vented propane gas heater, no less a kerosene heater. I would get a bad headache the next day, to the point of being nauseous. Other than welding outside, which is what I'm going to do in a couple of minutes, I'd suggest wearing a good painter's mask, not one of those lame dust masks. (That always kills me when I see people spray painting with a dust mask on those feeble home improvement shows.) Anyway, you're probably just a sensitive guy, like me. At least we get the women.
 

·
Race The Truck
Joined
·
675 Posts
johnsongrass1 said:
I did some welding over the christmas weekend. Flux welding mild steel at that. The gargae I was working in was small but we had the door open. Air was kinda still. Yesterday and today I feel very fatiged and scatterbrained. Can't quite get my head on straight kinda feeling. Sorta like when you first wake up. except it last's all day. Seems like the last time I was welding for him the same thing happened. I've heard of long term exposure health realted problems, nothing short term though. Could it be? Ever get this way from welding Flux fumes in a small shop?
That's what I got and have not work in 6 years. 30 years as a welder they still don't know whats all is wrong with me.

I can't get any answer to my health problem. So stop welding before you end up like me. Get a out side air mask system hobby air makes them.



Craig
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
I worked in a shop for a family friend when I was about 14. The guy always welded galvanized steel and I was in the shop with him every weekend. Within a few months I would cough up blood every monday and tuesday morning and to this day if there is galvanized steel being welded near me, within minutes I feel dizzy and sick to my stomach. Then I will have trouble breathing for a few days.... Watch what you breath in.
 

·
Lost in the 50s!
Joined
·
758 Posts
MARTINSR said:
Brian, the problem is, you probably do have some health issues because of the exposure. Your sensitivity to paint "may" be one of the symptoms.

It is like a guy who says he has smoked for years and doesn't have a problem. Well, yes he does, he just doesn't know it yet.

Start wearing that fresh air system while welding, it isn't too late to start.

Brian
Fortunately, I do not do that type of work any more. The last time I welded anything was an office chair for a friend several years ago. :rolleyes:
 

·
Race it, Don't rice it!
Joined
·
8,813 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I don't know why I didn't think of it before, but it probably my allergies I didn't use to have being aggrevated. Ever wake up at 5am and sneeze 75 times in row?
 

·
Flamethrower
Joined
·
339 Posts
When I was helping my dad redo the trunk in his 64 Buick, I enlisted a good friend of mine who is better with a welder to do the structural body mounts and I did the less important floor sections. Anyways we used a weld-through primer that froms a zinc phosphate after it is heated up by the current required to weld. Anyways, later that day, I felt really stiff (more ways than one, zinc is good for that) and couldn't figure out why. I asked another friend why that was and he informed me of the effects of zinc on the body and the stiffness it caused. I will use more ventilation if I ever use that zinc phosphate primer again. I weld occassionally and not in large amounts at a time, so welding does not really bother me, but I have a higher than normal resistance to chemicals ande stuff like that.
 

·
I need a bucket of arc sparks
Joined
·
895 Posts
Ten years ago I was working at a copper smelter shutdown in which we were replacing the launderers. The boss told me to get a torch and cut a iron support off. He then neglected to tell me to wear a respirator or that their was a layer of flu dust on top of it. I proceeded to light the torch and cut the iron when it began to give off a noxious fume. It started to choke me and burn my lungs like hell. I couldn't breath and had to drop the torch and move outside into the fresh air. It hurt so bad I wish I could have died on the spot, my foreman and co-workers thought it was funny. After a half hour of gasping for air my foreman said you shouldn't cut iron with a torch with flu dust on it. Then he proceeded to tell me to get back to work, I should have went to the hospital and filed a report with MSHA. One of these days it will probably come back to haunt me.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top