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Discussion Starter #1
I am thinking about buying an oil pan for my V8 monza project. found one that has a small crease in it that leaks. is there any problems i should know about trying to lay a bead over this crease so it doesnt leak anymore? :confused:
 

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I have never used a welder to repair a oil pan...but I have removed the pan, cleaned it up real good and used a brazing rod and a torch several times with out any problems.
 

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welding on an oil pann ?

Yeah scrapp the Brazeing Idea . Migg , Arc or Gas . Brazeing will leak . In fact after a Year or so . You will be Peelin the Brazeing off, with a screw driver .

Good flatt Penetrateing Weld is best . I like too Drill End's of Crack's with a small drill bit . << real Small bit . then, start and end my bead in a Circle .

Keep's it from crackin further . Insures that it wont continue too leak at the, end of your weld's .



Sean
 

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Sean's said:
Yeah scrapp the Brazeing Idea . Migg , Arc or Gas . Brazeing will leak . In fact after a Year or so . You will be Peelin the Brazeing off, with a screw driver .

Good flatt Penetrateing Weld is best . I like too Drill End's of Crack's with a small drill bit . << real Small bit . then, start and end my bead in a Circle .

Keep's it from crackin further . Insures that it wont continue too leak at the, end of your weld's .



Sean
Thats the way to do it..and a bit of hammer and dolly work to make it smooth is good to..we do this sort of thing a lot when we want an oil pan to fit a particular application..like have more oil capacity or something..

Sam
 

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yea

yea just clean up both sides of the weld area really well and put a straight bead then put a weave over that and it should hold well enough

if all else fails.......... :smash:
 

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Sean, Don't know where you learned to braze but if you can scrape it off with a screw driver (or even knock it off with a chisel!) even years after it has been on there it was simply not done right. Brazing is simple, the easiest way to do this and by far the most common way and if done even half way right it will never leak. In my weld shop we always brazed things like oil pans and in the 35 years I ran the place we fixed a heck of a lot of pans, leaking oil pans is a common problem.
 

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oldred said:
Sean, Don't know where you learned to braze but if you can scrape it off with a screw driver (or even knock it off with a chisel!) even years after it has been on there it was simply not done right. Brazing is simple, the easiest way to do this and by far the most common way and if done even half way right it will never leak. In my weld shop we always brazed things like oil pans and in the 35 years I ran the place we fixed a heck of a lot of pans, leaking oil pans is a common problem.
Thats the same thing that I thought also. ;) I have been doing it for over 40 years and you cannot knock mine off. I am kinda glad now that I did not tell about the ones that I fixed with JB Weld, Lmao :D
 

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I have brazed holes in oil pans on diesel engines in mining equipment for many years and some of these things had cast iron oil pans, we also have brazed countless auto oil pans. Brazing is by far the simplest and easiest way to do this and unless the repair needs to be hidden for appearance sake I see no reason to do it any other way. If that braze joint flows out properly, easy to do BTW, then the ONLY way you are going to knock it off is with a grinder.
 

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Henry Highrise said:
Thats the same thing that I thought also. ;) I have been doing it for over 40 years and you cannot knock mine off. I am kinda glad now that I did not tell about the ones that I fixed with JB Weld, Lmao :D
I have to agree. Brazing is a good way to go. Not the only way but as good as any other way talked about. Those of us who learned to braze many many years ago know its capabilities. I have seen cracked Model A fenders brazed 60 years ago still holding up and its not easy to remove it today. They shook and twisted for many years and still come back kicking.

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Brazing is a very underrated way to weld and most people would surprised at how strong it is. I have repaired many things with bronze (it is not brass as many people call it), some requiring a good deal of strength. There is one particular job that comes to mind that was not really practical to weld with steel involving a gear with a broken tooth. Rebuilding this tooth with steel rod (can be done but not practical in this case) and re-machining was not an option. It was brazed back on and quenched while still hot, this was done out in the field in cold muddy conditions and this HIGHLY stressed part is still going strong everyday 13 years later. Now what has all this got to do with fixing an oil pan? Just compare that situation with a thin steel pan that is under hardly any stress at all and it becomes apparent why brazing is the way to go here.

Sorry if I got a bit out in left field on this one but I just wanted to point out that brazing can be the problem solver that some people may need but overlook because of myths and misconceptions.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks alot guys, alot of good discussion in here. I think i will end up drilling the ends and welding it, just cause thats what i have access to. Thanks again.
 

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If you have not welded that thing yet there is zero benefit to drilling holes in the ends of the crack. This is a trick that is often used when welding cast iron but on a thin steel section like that oil pan it will serve no purpose at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
oldred said:
If you have not welded that thing yet there is zero benefit to drilling holes in the ends of the crack. This is a trick that is often used when welding cast iron but on a thin steel section like that oil pan it will serve no purpose at all.
thanks, havent welded anything yet.
 
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