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So I have a 97 Chevy Vortec 350 block. I read the recent discussion on the 383/350 debate. So what actually makes a 383 so much more expensive?I would like to stroke my 350 to a 383 and can't find any reason not to. I can pick up a new Scat 9000 series crank with a one piece rear main and a 3.75 in stroke for around $290. I already have the Vortec PM connecting rods that i have been told will work fine. Add a new set of good hyperauetic pistons and you have a nice 383 short-block. So what do people have against turning down a 400 crank or buying a new one for a few bills more? From my own research, it seems that there is a good amount of torque to be gained from the 383 for just a few dollars more. What other machine work is there to be done except the crank issue, grinding the oil pan drip rails,400 balancer and flywheel? Am I missing something? A roller cam 383, vortec heads, and a good intake sounds like a pretty killer torque machine to me, let alone the hp numbers that you could come up with. What do ya think?
 

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A 383 is a good idea. I dont understand why people are against them over a 350. You should be able to get a good 400 hp out of it and 450-500 ft lbs.

Adam
 

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Most of the posts I have read on here have agreed with you chevy21. I was never under the impression that 383's cost that much more to build and I think you'll find most people on here agree.
 

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The only "problem" is clearancing (Is that a word?) the rods, if you go with the 5.7 rods.
 

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camaro80 said:
Is there clearancing difference between 5.7" and 6" rods:confused:
The main problem is that all 6 inch rods are aftermarket and have more metal on them. So yes, they usually take more clearancing than a stock 5.7 rod. Aftermarket 5.7 is the same as a 6.

Chris
 

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When I was going to build my bracket racing engine, i figured i was going to turn a crank and get it balanced anyways, so with the price to turn a crank, I just bought one, and I bought the 383 cast crank, and used my 5.7" 350 rods, It would probably be more expensive if you went radical, but I agree with the last post, Why build a standard stroke 350 :D
 

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Lemon Wedge

When we put 400 cranks in the 350 block, the top of the rods connecting bolts used to hit the bottom of the cylinder. So we had a piece of wood carved like a lemon wedge that we used as a guide and would cut enough metal from the bottom of the cylinder to allow the rod caps to CLEARANCE the bottom of the block. Hard, no. Scary, yes. Now days we have rods that are clearanced to fit, we even get fancy and have a IBEAM designed rod.
I only do 383s in my rides, but I TAKE MY TIME AND CHECK EVERYTHING FOR CLEARANCE. No big deal and fun to build.

hr41pearl :cool:
 

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Why is it that we don't hear as much about 377 (destroked 400) as we do the 383?.
I think I'd much rather have the bigger bore and shorter stroke for a performance engine. Any opinions?
JA
 

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Id venture to say its because most people build their cars for low end lower RPM power. The 377 is much more of a top end type engine and probably not as good for a drag racing applications.

It sure would be fun though to have such a high revving setup matched with a 6-speed in a corner hugging car.
 

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johnnya said:
Why is it that we don't hear as much about 377 (destroked 400) as we do the 383?.
I think I'd much rather have the bigger bore and shorter stroke for a performance engine. Any opinions?
JA
uhh, because if you have a 400 block already its cheaper just to build a 400, and you'll walk away from a 377 any day of the week. Not a really smart choice for a build.... I woudl venture to say that a 383 would eat one too.

K
 
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