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Check out this thread: CLICK HERE The question is, what are you going to use it for? Are you planning on doing one interior or a lot of interiors. If you only want to do one interior, find a reasonably priced compound feed walking foot machine. Compound feed means it has a combination of drop feed, using a feed dog, and needle feed, which means the needle helps push the work forward in conjunction with the feed dog. What you're looking for is a Singer 111W or one of its many clones.
 

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Dan,

I read these threads all the time, but haven't had anything to add at this point. I picked up a Singer 78-1 a couple of years ago, and have played with it and found that it definately leaves some to be desired. Mosty, it is a walking foot, but not a compound walking foot, and I fight it trying to get an even stitch. Anyway, I found a new home for that machine and have now found a Consew 226 that you seem to like a lot. Any thing that I should know about that machine. The guy that I am getting it from uses Consew 206's and picked this one up. He has checked it out and runs good, so i guess I am just looking for any tips I could use.

Thanks
Doug

Ps. I am slowly working my way though the Foley-Belsaw home upholstery course.
 

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Hi Doug: Nothing special about the 226, it's just a good solid compound walking foot machine. I like mine because it was given to me for nothing! What I like about it is that the bobbin is on the right side of the needle under a sliding plate, and you don't have to take the bobbin case out to replace a bobbin. That's just a personal preference.
One thing I can tell you is to keep it oiled properly, and that includes the areas under the cover plate at the end of the machine head. Do you see the two oily looking wicks sticking out of the ends of some of the pieces? Keep those oiled along with the rest of the machine and it will last you a long time. There are other places inside that cover that also need to be oiled, but are not visible in this picture.
 

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As far as I know, Consew lists no such machine with that number. There is a 106R, however. This is a lighter weight industrial machine, and has only a 1/2" presser height lift. I'm not sure if it is a compound walking foot machine, but I think it is just needle feed. Here is a link to a manual for that machine: CLICK HERE If that's what the machine is on Craig's List, it would not be a the best choice for auto upholstery.
 

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DanTwoLakes said:
As far as I know, Consew lists no such machine with that number. There is a 106R, however. This is a lighter weight industrial machine, and has only a 1/2" presser height lift. I'm not sure if it is a compound walking foot machine, but I think it is just needle feed. Here is a link to a manual for that machine: CLICK HERE If that's what the machine is on Craig's List, it would not be a the best choice for auto upholstery.
Oops, my bad. The list of Consew machines I have doesn't list 166 or 167 as one of their model numbers, but there obviously is such a machine. It appears that this machine might be a predecessor of the Consew 206. It has a bobbin case that is vertical instead of horizontal, and you need to remove the bobbin case to change bobbins. It also uses a standard industrial needle size of 135X17. If it is close to a 206 in specifications, it would work fine for auto upholstery. The listing in Seattle Craig's list has expired, so no way to look at it there.
 

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Overlock machines stitch, trim, and overcast seams as they sew, which would not have many practical applications in auto upholstery. This would be great sewing clothing, etc, but I'm afraid the machine would not be heavy enough to do seat covers with sew foam.
 

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Auto Upholstery

Hi, my fiance and I just bought a 74 super beetle and are restoring it. I have a 67 singer machine my mom got me and it works get. Anyways I am going to be redoing the seats and have bought the fabrics which is like a pleather with a fuzzy backing. Anyone have any idea regarding the thread to use for this. The book that came with the machine says heavy, but I am also worried about tearing at the seam. Any suggestions would be appreciated..Thanks Dale
 

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Use #92 polyester thread. Standard thread is size 69 nylon. #92 is half again thicker, and slightly stronger than the 69 nylon. Polyester stands up better to UV rays. To keep from cutting the fabric, set your stitch length to 5 or 6. Also, make sure the tensions are adjusted correctly. You can have stitches that look right, but if both tensions are too tight you can still cut the fabric.
 

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We bought my wife a Nakajima 280L machine about 20+ years ago.. still works well. it will sew your fingers together if you are not careful
 

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I don´t know what the market is like in the USA, but I would recommend you an "Adler" or a "Pfaff". My granddad bought the the first Adler back in the 50s and it is still used in our company every day and it works just fine. Parts are readyly available and those machines keep their value pretty good.

Sure modern machines offer some benefits, like alternating transport, clutch-less step motors, air-pressure operated thread cutter and foot lift and so on... all stuff you won´t really need.
 

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Microsoft Paint said:
Hey Dan do you think a Kenmore Zig Zag machine would be able to handle light interior stuff like door panels or stretching it a bit.... seats.
A home machine can handle a lot. They have the strength to sew through many layers of fabric. What they don't have is enough lift height to get as much under the foot as car seats require. They are also probably not going to have a compound feed system. If you're only sewing a few layers of fabric together, it will work fine. If you're trying to sew two layers of sew foam and fabric together, you will be disappointed.
 

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UngerMarkus said:
I don´t know what the market is like in the USA, but I would recommend you an "Adler" or a "Pfaff". My granddad bought the the first Adler back in the 50s and it is still used in our company every day and it works just fine. Parts are readyly available and those machines keep their value pretty good.

Sure modern machines offer some benefits, like alternating transport, clutch-less step motors, air-pressure operated thread cutter and foot lift and so on... all stuff you won´t really need.
Pfaff is a well known brand in the US, Adler not as well known. Adler is the best sewing machine on the planet as far as I'm concerned, and Pfaff is a close second. Adler industrial machines have 1/2" shafts throughout where other machines only use 3/8" shafts. The problem is that they are expensive to start with and hold their value, so getting a bargain on a used machine is hard to do. If you can find a good deal on either one, jump at it.
Changing out a clutch motor for a servo motor is an absolute no brainer. The servos make operating a sewing machine much easier, so you spend less time learning to control the machine and more time learning to sew.
 
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