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tryn to learn
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i got here a Masercraft(canadiantire) ARC wire feeder welder model #117-032

ive searched the net and it has come up with nothing at all, i would like to know how many amps it is and what i can weld with it.

the front has a wire speed nob and a low or high heat setting.

i have never welded before other then some sheet metal i put in my vise, i had a terrable time.

do i need to change the wire for welding differnt things? if i got the wrong wire no wonder i cant weld worth sh*t.
 

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tryn to learn
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841 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
ok i just found the specs on it

primary volts - 120
primary amps - 18
single phase, 60hz, KVA - 2.2
secondary volts - 18
secondary amps - 75
duty cycle - 20%
Max. open circuit volts - 31

how thick of metal can i weld with this? any tips on starting out?
 

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Kenneth Howard hates you...
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572 Posts
Does it have a gas hookup? If it does, you NEED the gas(C25...its a Carbon Dioxide/Argon mix) if it doesn't then you need fluxcore wire. Go for the extra and get the gas...BIIIIIG difference! Fluxcore is a sloppy,cheap way of welding, not nearly as strong or clean. Also, if it has gas capability but has fluxcore wire in it, you MUST make sure that the polarity is set to the correct setting.
I am assuming that it is a wire feed welder and not a MIG(gas capable) or an ARC welder(different type all together)
For Sheetmetal with a gas hookup you'll want a .023 - .030 solid wire. For Fluxcore welding (without gas) you'll want about a .030 - .035 fluxcore wire.

Here is a little sample that I found on another page:
MIG-Flux Core Wire-Feed Welders - The letters "MIG" stand for "Metal Inert Gas". A bottle of gas provides the shielding cloud. MIG is a much cleaner process since there is no melted flux to spatter or create slag. The MIG gas can be blown away by a breeze, so it must be sheltered or inside. MIG machines can weld thin sheet metal as thin as 24 gauge and up to 1/4" a 115-volt MIG welder. MIG wire is available to weld aluminum or stainless steel.

Hope this helps out some what...I am getting tired so it may not make any sense.
Later,
WEIMER
 

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tryn to learn
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841 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
hey thanks for the reply!

the welder does not have a gas hookup.

i decided im going to buy a new welder, ive never welded before so i dont want a high tech one but i also dont want to grow out of it ethier. i am also on kind of a budget since im a student and my parents dont buy me stuff. i will be using it for sheetmetal and also i plan on building a offroad mini-sandrail buggy, not shure the tube thickness yet tho but the OD is about 1.2-1.5 inch of the frame.

is there any welders that you reccommend for me?

since i have never welded before other then a little playing around with this one i got. is it really worth taking a welding course($450) or just practice practice and practice.

Thank you
 

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tryn to learn
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841 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
i see canadian tire has a nice welder on sale right now. its a Lincoln MIG Pak 10 Welder, 100 amp. how would it be?


Product Description
You don't need high voltage in your garage just to handle those occasional welding jobs. This complete Lincoln MIG welder kit welds 24-gauge through 1/4 in. thick mild steel, provides continuous control for precise setting of wire speed, has an adjustable quick-release idle roll pressure arm for optimum wire feeding, and you guessed it--works with standard 115 V input. This 100 amp welder comes with a two-pound spool of .025 in. L-56 MIG wire, a Magnum 100L gun and cable, spare contact tips, a work clamp with a 10 ft. cable, a welding handshield, and an instructional video. It works with both 4 in. and 8 in. diameter wire spools.
 

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Lincoln is a good brand and that model would be great for hobby use on sheet metal. I don't know about welding up a rail job with it though. You might need more amperage to get penetration. Check into that before you buy.
Also, that model doesn't come with a gas regulator. You'll have to buy a separate kit.
 

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tryn to learn
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841 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thank you for the reply. ya i see they got the gas regulator kit for another 120bucks at canadian tire for it. i found the manual for the welder on the net and it says it is 88amps.

what kind of gas bottles does these things use? is it just thos little $10 disposible type ones?
 

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I am on my 5th welder. I finally got a 125 amp wire feed gas welder. The best for sheet metal. Don't waste your money on the small ones. get one that is properly set up. I was going at it in 10 minutes. no class needed. Wait and get the money for a good one. I have 2 flux core ones for sale now. The gas bottle is a refill unit.
 

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The smaller welders do not have a lot of capacity and are a little short on features. I have one and I use it a fair amount but it's not my only welder. My biggest complaint is they only have a 4 step voltage control so you can end up with "too much or too little". I would look for a unit that is set up for gas and has continuously variable voltage control at a minimum. Personally, if it doesn't say Hobart, Lincoln, or Miller on the front, I don't want it. A quality welder is easily a lifetime investment for the hobbiest. My big TIG is a Miller that was made in 1969 and it still runs very well.
 
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