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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I live in south Florida and am working on a DIY project, which includes spray painting my plastic engine cover and battery box to match the color of my car. I'm using rattle can aerosol spray paint since I don't have a paint gun nor a paint booth.

I will be painting in an empty parking garage so I'm not in direct sunlight. The problem is that the weather here in FL is less than ideal for painting. For example on average, in the early morning the temperature is 79 degrees with 82% humidity. The afternoon temp is 92 degrees with 55% humidity. The evening temp is 89 degrees with 70% humidity.

So my question is when would be the best time to spray paint given the above weather conditions? I'm using Bulldog Adhesion Promoter, SEM Flexible Primer Surfacer, a DuPont or PPG bascoat ordered from Paintscratch.com, and SprayMax 2K Urethane Aerosol Clear Coat.

Also given the above weather conditions will the flash off times for each product still be the same?

Thanks for your help,
flips712
:welcome:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok well I know that the paint products I'm using say that they should be used between 70-80 degrees at 50% or less humidity. Will spray painting in 82% humidity pose a problem?

Thanks,
flips712
 

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is it better at night? At night you'd be dealing with it curing in the cold. I'm not sure as it's not really an issue out here. Might want to wait til someone can chime in who has experience painting in those climates.
 

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If you can, leave a dehumidifier on during the night, and spray when the temp gets to the middle of your reducers heat range, and keep it closed up other than the req'd ventilation.. Room Air conditioner, sitting on the garage floor with the under door insulated underneath should also work, as it will also dehumidify, but don't leave ither running during the paint process
 

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tech69 said:
early in the morning.
Always!

Some of the worst problems I have had calls on in the past by top notch painters is where they were behind on getting a job out and had to paint at night.
Last call was a 40 ford and the front end got damaged after car was put together and the car was set to be shipped to the owner in CA.
9 at night the painter called and the black base (ppg) was blushing leaving white streaks here and there. 80 degrees and 98% humidity.

Another was a grabber type blue color on an old mustang and painter did not notice the blush in the roof until he applied the first coat of clear.

Both of these painter are the best of the best, one in MS and one in GA but normally don't paint at night and both were behind on getting the car out.

Had a friend who was transferred to AL from VA years ago and had been restoring a 69 black Firebird, the house he rented in AL only had a car port.
I started shooting the base at around 6 in morning and had last coat of clear on about 9. Never did a carport job before but it turned out to be one of the nicest paint jobs I ever did.
last coat of clear (4th) was shot just before 9 and I did fight that coat as the heat was rising fast by then.
 

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Back year ago we used to spray in the morning and wet the booth filters good with the garden hose. In fact when I ran a shop in az. we had a lawn sprinkler that sprayed the filters as we painted When you walked in the booth it felt like it was air conditioned.
 

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BarryK said:
Always!

Some of the worst problems I have had calls on in the past by top notch painters is where they were behind on getting a job out and had to paint at night.
Last call was a 40 ford and the front end got damaged after car was put together and the car was set to be shipped to the owner in CA.
9 at night the painter called and the black base (ppg) was blushing leaving white streaks here and there. 80 degrees and 98% humidity.

Another was a grabber type blue color on an old mustang and painter did not notice the blush in the roof until he applied the first coat of clear.

Both of these painter are the best of the best, one in MS and one in GA but normally don't paint at night and both were behind on getting the car out.

Had a friend who was transferred to AL from VA years ago and had been restoring a 69 black Firebird, the house he rented in AL only had a car port.
I started shooting the base at around 6 in morning and had last coat of clear on about 9. Never did a carport job before but it turned out to be one of the nicest paint jobs I ever did.
last coat of clear (4th) was shot just before 9 and I did fight that coat as the heat was rising fast by then.
Not to hijack this thread, but is there any solution to "blush"? I've had this happen on small parts and just ended up redoing them...

Russ
 

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S10xGN said:
Not to hijack this thread, but is there any solution to "blush"? I've had this happen on small parts and just ended up redoing them...

Russ
All us old folks know what blush is from the old lacquer days but it is kinda funny to listen to a younger painter that has never been through the problem before, it usually gives a new meaning to going to confession after the phone call.

Using the proper grade reducer in the base is a starting point but using the next slowest grade is good insurance to prevent the problem.
Second longer flash times, when you get to the carbon heavy colors like Black, Dark blue and Dark green and some of the medium blues, you really need to pay attention to flash times.
First coat is usually the most important coat of all.
Not wetting the floor is another good precaution.

Basecoats although are very close to lacquer but are not as susceptible to blushing as lacquers and is rather rare, it is not uncommon to talk to a painter that has been painting say 15 years and does not know what the H is going on and that would be a lot nicer word, then I hear from him.

All the conditions must be perfect as well as the color of the base for the blushing to happen.

I remember a polyurethane professor at Rolla saying years ago 93 degrees and 93% humidity is when no paint works perfectly and anything can happen or nothing may happen.

Not sure I buy that statement but there are a lot of times where I know someone is telling me the exact steps he has taken and there is just no way his problem should have happened and I feel like an idiot when I say, you did nothing wrong but I don't have an answer. Perhaps that would have been a good day for him to have bought a lottery ticket?
 

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i quit painting at night. 1 reason because of the problems listed above, although i havent had it happen to me, i see/read the problems.....and #2 when you've worked 10+ hours straight and now you have to get in the booth and get one sprayed....you're exhuast. not to mention the heat. it only adds to the percentage of a screw up. take a deep breath...hang the gun up and go home. get up early, start fresh and go to town!

in the summer, i try to get up around 4-5 and start spraying. the day before the car gets ready in the booth. i get all the base on that morning....let it sit till next morning...do any nibbing i need...recoat then clear.

spreading it out over 3 days makes a whole lot better, easier, and less stressful job than trying to knock it all out in 1 day.

this aint collision work.
 

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in collision work i don't have the Satisfaction of saying oh ill do that in the morning :welcome:

i dont have blushing problems anymore,Dupont was the Worse :nono: from Base to clear we had problems with it doing Late work and Winter Months :pain:

Before any of you dupont guys jump on the Band wagon we used for 35years (MY dad)

i sprayed 380s growing up learning Tech and sprayed 580s the first junk Enamel clear they came out with :boxing:

MY dad loved the Super Productive clear Dupont had 7600s he sprayed truck loads of the stuff(collision repair)at our shop mine Now.


it was Dog **** imo Blushed all the time in not so right conditions :boxing:

he would take a heat lamp and draw the moisture out(what he called Milking)



i have found with the newer clear(especially SPI) only draw back I have is Die back)when conditions suck!!!!!!!


it always comes out :thumbup:



to make my long story short.

Conditions are Best early of the morning on even the worse day,but i can t always spray that way :nono:


when i start a job i do it all from Frame straightening to finish!

i have a dead line and SPI has made my life easier from start to Finish :thumbup:

even though it sucks to Be Painting this late at night :evil:
 

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Just a question with the painting in the morning thing. I've beet watching the humidity forecast and noticed its pretty high in the morning 85ish but at 6 its down to 65ish. Give thtemp goes from 70 to 85 but I would think the lower humidity higher temp would be better to paint in.

Am I off my rocker or does that make since?
 

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Does all this apply to priming (epoxy or 2K) as well?

I'm a hobbyist so don't have the convenience of spraying in the morning since I go to work (and I don't love my car enough to get up at 4 or 5 to spray it, neither do the neighbors :D ).
 

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Does all this apply to priming (epoxy or 2K) as well?
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No, even bugs don't seem to like epoxy or primer.


Just a question with the painting in the morning thing. I've beet watching the humidity forecast and noticed its pretty high in the morning 85ish but at 6 its down to 65ish. Give thtemp goes from 70 to 85 but I would think the lower humidity higher temp would be better to paint in.
----------------------------------------------------
Guess it would be the state you are in and time of year, in south we stay hot in early evening and as the sun goes down you can watch the humidity go up.
Temp is as related to the problem as the humidity, if one is low and the other high, that can be a good thing.
 

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After my last paint job I swore to never paint at night again, only due to the insects. They have a way to finding a way in regardless of how well the booth is sealed. When you're working at night and all those lights are blazing every bug for a quarter mile comes calling desperate to come in and treat your clear coat like flypaper.
 

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i have painted in central texas all my life. the one most important thing i learned was to cool the metal before you start. rinse it down good until the temp is down then blow it off and prep. ambient temp means little when trying to shoot on metal that is 90+ degrees. it will kick the solvents before they even get started. i've cleared at 110 with no problem other than falling out from heat exhaustion ...... :sweat:
 

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Yea dusk and night are the worst times mainly for the bugs, and early morning is when most of the bugs are talking to Mr. Sand man and won't be a problem, but you have a small window of time in the AM before it gets too hot, Shine did have a damn good point about cooling the metal off, But then you have to make sure you get all to water out of the knocks and crannies. :thumbup:
 
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