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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone. My name is Kenneth. I am hearing impaired. I reside in New York City. I really fell in love with Hot Rod and Muscle Cars. I have been consider about my own chop custom shop in Florida or Calif. I am not so sure. However I need to learn to how to built it. I really want to learn to work with high performance and custom fabrications. I was trying to find High Performance and Hot Rod Custom schools in New York or other states.

What do you suggest?
 

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Evil Wicked Mean And Nasty
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Hi welcome to the site, You can do a search on the web for the school nearest to you that is what i would do, And when you find one ask around about it and get all the info you can and even visit the school if it is where you can.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Cole
 

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wretched ratchet said:
If I were you, I would try and get hired at one of the Pro Shops and then go from there.
W.R. sort of beat me to the punch here, but before spending a lot of time and money on school or training, my suggestion would be to get lots of seat-of-the-pants experience. You want to be sure that fabrication work is really something you enjoy before investing heavily in your education.

I can't tell from your original post how involved you are in actual fabrication at this juncture, so I may be way off base here. But sometimes people get the wrong impression of hot rod building...often times a result of the highly romanticized versions you see on many TV shows.

Building hot rods is a dirty, grimy, difficult, dangerous, time consuming, tiring, strenuous, back breaking business. It requires patience, commitment, and a ton of self motivation. The results can be priceless in terms of pride and fulfillment, but the road to those results is long and challenging.

I'd just hate to see you spend a lot of time and money going to school only to discover later that this is not the type of work you really love to do. On the other hand, if you already have some years under your belt as a shadetree hot rodder and fabricator, and you wake up every morning chomping at the bit to get back out to the garage, then by all means set your sites on that education and training...whether it be in school or at some pro-level fabrication shop.
 

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As someone who actually works at an automotive trade school, Universal Technical Institute, I would actually agree with the above posts, for your particular situation. If you already have fabrication / hot rod shop experience then I would encourage you to attend a good school to make the most of your chances of succeeding in a tough business. If you don't yet have shop experience then like the others said find a good shop in your area & work there for a while, learn as much as you can & then go to school. Most importantly you will get a good feel for if this is really something you want to do. You will probably find that most performance / hot rod shops wont pay you much, if anything, and probably won't have any benefits. That side of the auto technician business is more about who you know & being willing to pay your dues before you find "success".
If you are looking for a more traditional auto technician career then I would say to attend a good school, like ours, first & start your career out in a better place right away.

Good Luck!

TOM
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hey!

eloc431962 said:
Hi welcome to the site, You can do a search on the web for the school nearest to you that is what i would do, And when you find one ask around about it and get all the info you can and even visit the school if it is where you can.,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Cole

Get it! I really appreciate it. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey!

toms66gtstang said:
As someone who actually works at an automotive trade school, Universal Technical Institute, I would actually agree with the above posts, for your particular situation. If you already have fabrication / hot rod shop experience then I would encourage you to attend a good school to make the most of your chances of succeeding in a tough business. If you don't yet have shop experience then like the others said find a good shop in your area & work there for a while, learn as much as you can & then go to school. Most importantly you will get a good feel for if this is really something you want to do. You will probably find that most performance / hot rod shops wont pay you much, if anything, and probably won't have any benefits. That side of the auto technician business is more about who you know & being willing to pay your dues before you find "success".
If you are looking for a more traditional auto technician career then I would say to attend a good school, like ours, first & start your career out in a better place right away.

Good Luck!

TOM
No problem. I really appreciate it. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey!

toms66gtstang said:
As someone who actually works at an automotive trade school, Universal Technical Institute, I would actually agree with the above posts, for your particular situation. If you already have fabrication / hot rod shop experience then I would encourage you to attend a good school to make the most of your chances of succeeding in a tough business. If you don't yet have shop experience then like the others said find a good shop in your area & work there for a while, learn as much as you can & then go to school. Most importantly you will get a good feel for if this is really something you want to do. You will probably find that most performance / hot rod shops wont pay you much, if anything, and probably won't have any benefits. That side of the auto technician business is more about who you know & being willing to pay your dues before you find "success".
If you are looking for a more traditional auto technician career then I would say to attend a good school, like ours, first & start your career out in a better place right away.

Good Luck!

TOM
Thanks for advised. I really appreciate it. Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
cboy said:
W.R. sort of beat me to the punch here, but before spending a lot of time and money on school or training, my suggestion would be to get lots of seat-of-the-pants experience. You want to be sure that fabrication work is really something you enjoy before investing heavily in your education.

I can't tell from your original post how involved you are in actual fabrication at this juncture, so I may be way off base here. But sometimes people get the wrong impression of hot rod building...often times a result of the highly romanticized versions you see on many TV shows.

Building hot rods is a dirty, grimy, difficult, dangerous, time consuming, tiring, strenuous, back breaking business. It requires patience, commitment, and a ton of self motivation. The results can be priceless in terms of pride and fulfillment, but the road to those results is long and challenging.

I'd just hate to see you spend a lot of time and money going to school only to discover later that this is not the type of work you really love to do. On the other hand, if you already have some years under your belt as a shadetree hot rodder and fabricator, and you wake up every morning chomping at the bit to get back out to the garage, then by all means set your sites on that education and training...whether it be in school or at some pro-level fabrication shop.
Get it! Yeah. I understand that what you say. I really appreciate it. Thanks again.
 
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