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Just purchased a Lincoln Mig 15 230V. It may be sometime before I get around to wiring up the garage. I was hoping I could run it off the dryer plug temporarily. I have heard this is possible but need to know exactly how to do it. I am confused why the dryer plug has four prongs and the welder only 3.
 

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Lymanb

I've used a dryer circuit with a mig and stick welder.It will be okay as long as the imput amps of the welder are'nt higher than the dryer circuit.You'll have to buy a new plug for the end of your welder cord.Or make up an adapter cable to fit the dryer recep and the welder.This would be good if you need to weld some distance from your dryer recep.
 

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Lymanb

I forgot something.The dryer has four prongs because it has to have 110v.The welder does'nt.The dryer requires two hot wires,a nuetral,and a ground wire.The welder needa two hot wires and a ground.Hope this helps
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Lymanb said:
I forgot something.The dryer has four prongs because it has to have 110v.The welder does'nt.The dryer requires two hot wires,a nuetral,and a ground wire.The welder needa two hot wires and a ground.Hope this helps
That's what confuses me. What wire goes to what?

The two hots from the dryer obviuosly go to the two hots on the welder but what about the third welder wire? Does it go to the ground on the dryer or the neutral?
 

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A 3 prong plug 230 volt cord has 2 hot connections and 1 neutral connection. A 4 prong plug has 2 hot connections, 1 neutral connection and 1 ground connection. What you want to connect are the 2 hot and 1 neutral connections. The ground connection is a safety to prevent electrocution if you appliance shorted internally but not to the neutral, the ground connects the appliance to a safe path for a short circuit instead of you. Your welder may be double insulated and does'nt need a ground. Check any manuals you can find on your welder. You may have to search online to find them if you did not get them with the welder. Be safe.
To get a 110 volt circut in a dryer they use 1 hot and 1 neutral conection, each hot lead is half of the 230/240 voltage.
 

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As mentioned above..

Amperage... dryer is usually 40Amps and the welder might be 50Amps. If thats the case you will be tripping the breaker often.
 

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I was getting my garage ready to run a welder awhile back. I thought hard about using my dryer plug and figured I would route it into the garage, make it a dedicated welder plug and buy a gas dryer. Much of what I read on the subject, however, indicated that the amperage capacity of the dryer circuit wouldn't be sufficient for the welder. Anyhow, I ended up putting a 60 amp sub panel in the garage and would recommend that as the best solution if you can afford to do it. That way, you get your 240v dedicated circuit and you have plenty of room in your box for 120v circuits should you decide to add lights, heaters, whatever. If you can manage the job yourself, you'll be able to do it for a reasonalble price (those panels are expensive though) but if you have to get it done by an electrician (as I did) get ready to dig deep. If you go that route, I recommend you use a licensed electrician. Good luck.
jor
 

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jor said:
I was getting my garage ready to run a welder awhile back. I thought hard about using my dryer plug and figured I would route it into the garage, make it a dedicated welder plug and buy a gas dryer. Much of what I read on the subject, however, indicated that the amperage capacity of the dryer circuit wouldn't be sufficient for the welder. Anyhow, I ended up putting a 60 amp sub panel in the garage and would recommend that as the best solution if you can afford to do it. That way, you get your 240v dedicated circuit and you have plenty of room in your box for 120v circuits should you decide to add lights, heaters, whatever. If you can manage the job yourself, you'll be able to do it for a reasonalble price (those panels are expensive though) but if you have to get it done by an electrician (as I did) get ready to dig deep. If you go that route, I recommend you use a licensed electrician. Good luck.
jor
I did the same thing. That 60 amp box was good money spent. I had it done at the same time I had my main service bumped to 200 amps. I'm adding a 230 this weekend for my new compressor.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
48ChryslerRodder said:
A 3 prong plug 230 volt cord has 2 hot connections and 1 neutral connection.

A 4 prong plug has 2 hot connections, 1 neutral connection and 1 ground connection. What you want to connect are the 2 hot and 1 neutral connections.

I don't think that is correct. My manual states that the plug for the welder is hot hot ground and NOT hot hot neutral.

I found this diagram on a welding forum (see attached)
 

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russlaferrera
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230 mig wireing

asennad said:
I don't think that is correct. My manual states that the plug for the welder is hot hot ground and NOT hot hot neutral.

I found this diagram on a welding forum (see attached)
The red wire is connected to 110 volt (line voltage

The black is connected to 110 volt (line voltage)

The green is connected to ground. (see Note)

The white is connected to ground. (see Note)

NOTE: should you look into the electrical circuit box, you will note that the white, bare copper and green wires all are connected to the ground buss bar.
So call it what you want, ground, neutral 3rd wire , whatever. That is where it is connected......russ
 

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Yes the neutral and ground both connect inside the circuit breaker/fuse box. Most ground connections rely on conduit or a dedicated ground wire to ground out an outlet. If you have an older house with out conduit or a detached garage you may not have an adequate ground. Alternating current flows back and forth and a poor ground/neutral connection will cause problems. Use the neutral connection. You have 3 wires coming into your house, 2 hot and 1 neutral. The neutral is connected to ground but provides a wire flow path for the current,a much better conductor than dirt.
 
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