Hot Rod Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
looking for chasse wiring harness suggestions I don't need any more than 18 circuits and that leaves a few open for future use.
any ideas on specific manufactures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,652 Posts
I like any of the "stand alone" fuse block style. I mean the ones where wires are screwed onto terminals on the fuse panel and NOT hard wired in. Ron Frances, American Autowire and Centech come to mind. When I get the "kit" I also like to list each terminal as either BAT, ING or ACC. This helps later on when adding a circuit. Of course ALWAYS make and keep a copy of the panel with mods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
This is like asking what kind of Beer does someone like- your going to get lots of different answers-I have a Ron Francis Access 24/7 in my Car, and have been pleased with the quality and service I've received-
I picked that model because you can pull it off of the kick panel and check the fuses l (or wherever you mount it, it has magnetic mounts and and an extended harness so you don't have to be a contortionist to check stuff)-
It has 24 circuits so you would have room to grow-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
The Francis kits have the best tech support of all the kits. When you order the kit it comes with a serial number that stays in their files forever. This is important if you have a kit that has unique variations from standard.

That said there are multiple kits out there that perform as well, install as easily and are well made. I'm an electronics tech by trade so the installation for me is easy. If you are a rookie and have not wired a car before the Francis kit is one of the better choices, IMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The Francis kits have the best tech support of all the kits. When you order the kit it comes with a serial number that stays in their files forever. This is important if you have a kit that has unique variations from standard.

That said there are multiple kits out there that perform as well, install as easily and are well made. I'm an electronics tech by trade so the installation for me is easy. If you are a rookie and have not wired a car before the Francis kit is one of the better choices, IMHO.
Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This is like asking what kind of Beer does someone like- your going to get lots of different answers-I have a Ron Francis Access 24/7 in my Car, and have been pleased with the quality and service I've received-
I picked that model because you can pull it off of the kick panel and check the fuses l (or wherever you mount it, it has magnetic mounts and and an extended harness so you don't have to be a contortionist to check stuff)-
It has 24 circuits so you would have room to grow-
Thank You
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I like any of the "stand alone" fuse block style. I mean the ones where wires are screwed onto terminals on the fuse panel and NOT hard wired in. Ron Frances, American Autowire and Centech come to mind. When I get the "kit" I also like to list each terminal as either BAT, ING or ACC. This helps later on when adding a circuit. Of course ALWAYS make and keep a copy of the panel with mods.
Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Your choice will matter if you aren't using a GM steering column, Chevy engine with HEI, GM light and ignition switch. The directions for the cheap choices assume that. I'd pay particular attention to the fuse panel like its size and where the wires come out (Speedway come out underneath so it can't be flush mounted)j. Harder to judge is the wire ID like name or just number and how the fuses are identified. I've wired 2 fairly simple street rods from scratch and for my Dodge powered '18 Dodge rat rod it would have been easier to wire it from scratch than the Speedway 22 circuit kit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
That's where the Francis kit comes to the top. They will wire the plugs and terminals to the systems you are using. HEI and a Ford column, no problem. Call them and a tech guy will help you with customizing the kit and advise solutions to problems you may not see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
That's where the Francis kit comes to the top. They will wire the plugs and terminals to the systems you are using. HEI and a Ford column, no problem. Call them and a tech guy will help you with customizing the kit and advise solutions to problems you may not see.
Sounds like with them you really do get what you pay for. Not always true these days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,139 Posts
I went Kwik Wire with my Ford. They gave me a GM set of column plugs since I have a SBC in the car. Great instructions and I never had to call their tech number. This was their 14 circuit GM2 harness, about 5 years ago it was $275.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,476 Posts
I make my own harnesses. I use positive and negative post that pass through a section of hose surrounded by a gromet into the interior and run to distribution fuse blocks usually with a cutoff switch in between leaving no chance of battery drain.
This allows for a system that can be added to without rebuilding the entire harness. I use blue sea systems. They are a quality product at a fair price.

This is what I have used in the past and will be using on my current build here soon. I use cutoff switches from the same company.


It is a split blade system letting you have 6 constant and 6 key on.
You want more fuses simply buy a 2nd or 3rd box. I use 0 to 4 gauge wire to feed these boxes depending on how many and the fuses all feed relays. It makes for a very clean setup.

As far as wire goes I use 4 gauge (pos/neg)to feed relay distribution blocks (10 gauge to the relays) at the front, rear, dash, and middle.
This not only gives you full voltage at the sources it lets you run 14 gauge with a majority of the rest of the system keeping lower cost switches(factory rated) and wiring.

Now as far as switches and plugs. I use factory stuff. But I pull the pin terminals and then reinsert them so they are tight. I then use 4" zip ties to hold the say 3 wires together. This prevents one wire being pulled if the bare harness is grabbed/snagged.

I shield my wiring inside coolant or low pressure fuel hose. You carefully cut down the length then push the wire inside before using some 4 or 6" zip ties. These keep your wiring safe from heat, chemicals, uv, and can be cleaned much easier then plastic looms. If you need to replace a section that say laid on a header then it is a trip to your local parts store to buy it by the foot.

Now building your own will cost more. But you will know it is built right and will be able to trace issues down easier. By using distribution blocks that have lables you can see that say the taillight fuse is blown. That is the orange wire with black stripes(marker) every inch. Go back to the relay and see that you accidently ripped it out of the relay when you threw that tire into the trunk and it grounded( proper routing and a zip tie would have prevented.
Plug the orange wire in and then replace the fuse then your good to go.

Vs I have no taillights. Replace the fuse then wonder what color my taillight wire (no relay)are with no way to check but to strip my harness and hope I dont pull any other circuits that may be T'd within that harness.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I went Kwik Wire with my Ford. They gave me a GM set of column plugs since I have a SBC in the car. Great instructions and I never had to call their tech number. This was their 14 circuit GM2 harness, about 5 years ago it was $275.
Thanks for the come back . I looked into several and ordered the KwikWire
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top