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Discussion Starter #1
I was wonedering about the possibilities of installing a wooden venier onto my steel body. I have seen a few PT crusers with woodie trim and I think I would like it on my 1937 Ford. My plan is too buy some nice grained plywood and cut an outline of the [raised protion] then attach it to my body. Then fill in the cutouts with a verier of another type and color wood. Obviously I will need to sand it to look 'rounded' on top ...has anyone ever seen anything like that? How about some comments.
 

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Sounds cool! I had a friend who filled the panels on his'49 pickup box like that and it was neat- he used screws from the backside to hold them which I didn't like, but he also had a fabbed tonneau cover so you didn't see them anyway... Go for it- Yours will be 'personal' then. :)
 

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Another option would be paint. Woodgraining is an art and is looks 100% natural. If you look in our own Madd Syntst's photo album at the Ford station wagon thats paint, not wood. Another member, Shep, teaches this technique. He has a website, but right now I can't locate it. Another option would be wood vinyl sheeting that you would just peel and stick (its whats on PT's etc)

If you intend on going with your veneir and paneling idea, don't forget that there are many domestic as well as exotic woods that are not only affordable, but may just give you a very unique look. I'f you'd like a bit more help, feel free to contact me.

HK
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I considered both paint and vynel[plastic, whatever] but worry about artistic correct look. the stick on stuff has tendency to have bubbles. I had a '68 impala wagon and the stickon was not easy....but then to sand the wood to meed the body contours will not be easy either. I was thinking of attaching with [counter-sink holes, sheetmetal type screws in side the C/S with small chrome caps on the top of the countersink. Biggest scare now is shaping the wood underside too fit metal contours. At the flats is obviously 'no brainer' but as the body curves at the lower windows could be a challange. I did see a picture in the 'latese goodguys' of a convetable 'in an add' that looks okay but have no clue as too how he did it. I think its possible to cut your woodie pattern from a sheet of plywood then add inserts inside 'voids' to look like it should but am concerned about how wide to make the 'outline' cause that will affect how far I go onto the rear finder line and of course how far onto the 'side hoods'
I am up too my *** in snow here so won't be taking this idea much farther until mid-summer got NSRA very soon in Oklahome city and then Pueblo so it may be July before I start.
 

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HK is so right.
I'd go with some unusual wood (real wood not ply----d). Make a pattern with butcher paper taped to the side of the car. You may redraw it 50 times but paper's cheap. Then determine the number of pieces you'll need for the perimeter wood frame and the dimensions(rough) of each one. The inserts, or panels, should be made of veneer in the wood type you desire.
Most early woodies had structural frames of oak, ash, or maple, with inserts of mahoghany or maple veneer. Use hidden fasteners to hold your perimeter if possible.
The most important thing about wood cars or wood trim is to keep it properly cleaned and varnished at all times.
 

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Just 2 cents... My brother makes signs.. he made a bunch of American Eagles signs in the mall. The curved ovals which look like a hunk of wood... they are curved sheets of steel with a wood veneer epoxied on. ;)

-Michael
 

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woody conversion

If you want to do it right, then you need to use a thicker wood for the outline, and then your veneer inside. Dont just glue on some cheep veneer. Look at what this 48 chevy looks like done the right way.
 

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Similar but different

a boat "artiste" near me did a very interesting project on his family's fiberglas sailboat. He took the transom off an old Matthews cruiser that was on the way to boat heaven and managed to take off about a 1/8" piece of veneer (i'll have to ask him how he did that). The piece of veneer was then cold molded to the transom of the sailboat (rather large curvature), epoxied on and epoxy finished clear to show off the woodgrain (it was a very nic piece of mahogany).

This guy is one of the best woodworkers you will ever meet. Not quite the same thing but thought it might give you some ideas.
 
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